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NEWS
September 17, 2007
Ralph Cook Sr., a retired sanitation driver, died of cancer Wednesday at his Baltimore home. He was 77. He worked for 30 years as a sanitation driver for Baltimore, retiring in 1993. Born in Camden, S.C., he moved to Baltimore at the age of 12 and attended public schools. He held various jobs before beginning a career with the city. He and the former Mary Catherine Davis were married for 58 years and had 10 children. He was a member of First Brethren Baptist Church in Baltimore. In retirement, he performed odd jobs in his neighborhood, enjoyed traveling, doing crosswords and other puzzles, and helped neighbors with transportation, lawn work and keeping the community clean.
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NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | May 6, 2013
Is the American body politic suffering from an autoimmune disease? The "hygiene hypothesis" is the scientific theory that the rise in asthma and other autoimmune maladies stems from the fact that babies are born into environments that are too clean. Our immune systems need to be properly educated by being exposed early to germs, dirt, whatever. When you consider that for most of human evolutionary history, we were born under shady trees or, if we were lucky, in caves or huts, you can understand how unnatural Lysol-soaked hospitals and microbially baby-proofed homes are. The point is that growing up in a sanitary environment might cause our immune systems to freak out about things that under normal circumstances we'd just shrug off. Hence, goes the theory, the explosion in asthma rates in the industrialized world, the rise in peanut and wheat allergies and, quite possibly, the spike in autism rates.
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NEWS
August 6, 2000
James Marion Hooper, founder and president of Harford Sanitation Services, died of cancer Thursday at his Bel Air home. He was 83. In 1954, he founded the refuse collection company, which now employs 120 people who work on approximately 50 trucks. Described as a hard-working and religious man, he rose before dawn to get his trucks out and spent the rest of the day farming some family-owned land in Street. He also welded his own trash containers. Born in Reckord in Harford County, he attended Fallston Elementary School.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2013
John Wood has a room filled with junk: steel pots, a wooden foot massager, heavy safe, TV antenna, plates, silver-plated brush, rolling pin, can opener, assorted gold-colored chains, lamps without shades, a New York Yankees baseball hat adorned in glitter. Everyone else's trash became his treasure, which came easily for Mr. Wood, who worked as a city sanitation worker for more than 35 years. He became one of the nation's most celebrated trash collectors, inspiring the television sitcom "Roc," but he also developed a reputation at home as an anchor for his Northeast Baltimore community.
NEWS
October 20, 1998
KUDOS to Baltimore officials who have announced a long-overdue sanitation crackdown. Let's see how long it takes to clean up problem houses like the one above.Pub Date: 10/20/98
NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,SUN STAFF | November 12, 1997
In the latest effort to wash away the city's grime and grit, Baltimore has created a new police force that will fine residents or take them to court for minor infractions such as littering and putting out trash too early.Clad in green and black, the sanitation police already have taken to the streets. But the small army of 25 officers has been told to issue no warnings, only fines, to violators starting Jan. 1."We have gone through the process of asking people and begging people not to trash the city, and that hasn't worked, so if you violate the law, we are going to cite you," said Elias Dorsey, the city's deputy health commissioner.
NEWS
March 31, 2000
WHERE DO WE go now that the free hot dogs and sodas have been gobbled up and volunteers of Mayor Martin O'Malley's spring clean-up have gone home? The mayor's trash attack was a success, symbolically: It showed a cleaner city is an achievable goal. Over two days, an army of 3,000 volunteers and 1,000 city workers removed 2,700 tons of trash, including 1,000 tires, from streets, alleys and vacant spaces. Even though that's twice as much as is collected on two days on regular garbage routes, the clean-up hardly made a dent.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,sun reporter | March 9, 2007
Pursuing a key goal of her fledging administration to make Baltimore cleaner, Mayor Sheila Dixon is set to announce today the re- organization of some key municipal sanitation functions and plans for a major multimedia anti-litter campaign. The mayor will also announce stepped-up efforts to clean city properties such as neighborhood bulk trash disposal stations and major roads leading into and out of the city, aides said yesterday. M. Celeste Amato, who is coming over from the Baltimore Development Corp.
NEWS
By Christian Ewell and Christian Ewell,SUN STAFF | November 13, 1997
About noon yesterday, Capt. Charles White and Sgt. Derrick Purvey of the city's new sanitation police found respect.In the hunt for a trash violator, they pulled their cruiser over to the curb in the 2000 block of Wilkens Ave.Their car had the look of law enforcement: an unadorned dark blue. White and Purvey wore badges on their uniforms, which feature green pants with black trim.As they emerged from the car, the few people present jumped and gave the officers looks that seemed to say, "I didn't do anything."
NEWS
May 4, 2001
Baltimore residents may drop off as many as 10 vehicle tires, with or without rims, tomorrow at the Northwest Transfer Station, 5030 Reisterstown Road. In conjunction with Maryland Department of the Environment's Tire Amnesty Day, the city Department of Public Works encourages residents to clear homes of discarded tires. The state will bear the cost of disposing of the tires. The Public Works department also says residents can place up to four rimless tires with their regular trash twice weekly.
BUSINESS
By Chris Korman | September 21, 2012
Maryland Attorney General Doug Gansler has reached a settlement with California-based CleanWell Company and OhSo Clean Inc, the makers of a hand sanitizer that claimed it was "proven to kill 99.99 percent of germs that can make you sick. " Gansler's investigation revealed no actual proof that those statements were true. CleanWell must pay $100,000 in penalties and costs, and will no longer be allowed to assert that its hand sanitizer can prevent disease or infection. “Companies that make unsubstantiated claims about their products deceive consumers into spending their hard-earned money on something that may not live up to its billing,” Gansler said in a statement.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2012
The four black orbs — dark-tinted security cameras — watch silently overhead in a room filled with stainless-steel pipes. The pipes carry raw milk from four large holding tanks outside the building into two large metal cabinets that look like oversized car radiators. This is one of the critical points in Cloverland Dairy's production process, where raw milk is pasteurized — heated well above 161 degrees Fahrenheit — and then pumped through pipes into other parts of the Baltimore plant for processing and packaging.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2012
Several Howard County restaurant owners are lobbying for the right to sell refillable containers of beer and wine to dine-in customers, but the plan has raised concerns from the owners of a liquor store that the sales would result in irresponsible drinking. Corinne Gorzo, who co-owns Glenwood Wine and Spirits with her husband, John, spoke out against refillable containers to state lawmakers, voicing concern about potential sanitation and safety issues resulting from customers drinking to excess.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | December 30, 2010
Acme Paper & Supply Co. has a name more befitting its past than its present. When the company started in 1946, it specialized in paper products such as drinking cups. Today, Acme is a much different company — so much so that the tagline "more than paper" has been appended to its name. Plastics are now the predominant part of the business. The company also has helped the U.S. House of Representatives switch to more environmentally friendly products. If you've ever used hand sanitizer at a hospital or restaurant, it was likely supplied by Acme.
NEWS
By Yeganeh June Torbati, The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2010
A 48-year-old sanitation worker sustained severe leg injuries after he was run over by a garbage truck early Tuesday morning in Essex, Baltimore County police said. Three emergency units responded to a call of an injured worker around 2 a.m. Tuesday, and transported the man, an employee of Marlyn Refuse Service Inc., to Maryland Shock Trauma Center, fire officials said. The man had attempted to step onto his truck during the early-morning route on Delaware Avenue near Lorraine Avenue, and slipped on a wet step.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,stephanie.desmon@baltsun.com | September 23, 2009
When Sandy Summers picks up her children - ages 6 and 10 - at elementary school, they're greeted with squirts of hand sanitizer. "When they get in the car, I put a glob on their hands," said the nurse, who lives in Homeland. "If they're going to eat a snack in the car, I make them use some. ... If I go to the grocery store, when I get in the car, the first thing I do is use the sanitizer. If I forget to use it before I touch the steering wheel, I put a whole bunch on my hands and just wipe it all over the steering wheel.
BUSINESS
March 12, 2009
N.C. firm buys Harford Sanitation A North Carolina-based company has purchased Harford Sanitation Services Inc. "They're hoping to continue business as usual," said Harford Sanitation Vice President Cindy Hooper Hushon, who will remain with the company through the transition. Waste Industries will take on Harford Sanitation's 52,000 customers and its 145 employees as well as its assets, including trucks. The company is looking for larger sites in Harford to relocate the business, Hushon said.
NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,SUN STAFF | November 12, 1997
In the latest effort to wash away the city's grime and grit, Baltimore has created a new police force that will fine residents or take them to court for minor infractions such as littering and putting out trash too early.Wearing green and black, the sanitation police have taken to the streets. But the small army of 25 officers has been told to issue no warnings, only fines, to violators, starting Jan. 1."We have gone through the process of asking people and begging people not to trash the city, and that hasn't worked, so if you violate the law, we are going to cite you," said Elias Dorsey, the city's deputy health commissioner.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | August 19, 2009
The 40,000 men and women held in Baltimore jails each year could receive speedier access to medical care and see improved sanitation conditions under a settlement between state officials and prisoner rights advocates filed Tuesday in federal court. Over the years, the advocates have documented what they say are dire problems at the Baltimore City Detention Center and the Central Booking and Intake Center: A longtime diabetic died after not receiving insulin. An asthmatic died because jail employees thought he was faking his condition and didn't give him an inhaler.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA and LAURA VOZZELLA,laura.vozzella@baltsun.com | May 6, 2009
Baltimore City Hall has been out front on this swine flu business, taking preventive measures and making official pronouncements even without any cases confirmed in the city. Except when it comes to the Purell provided to City Council members this week. On that one, the city was 17 months behind the curve. At a lunch meeting in City Hall on Monday, the Health Department provided the council with a flu briefing and 4-ounce bottles of the minty green gel, The Baltimore Sun's Annie Linskey reports.
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