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Sanibel Island

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NEWS
October 17, 1999
Jean Shepherd, 78, the prolific radio raconteur whose easy storytelling style earned comparisons to fellow Midwesterner Mark Twain, died early yesterday. Mr. Shepherd, described by media critic Marshall McLuhan as "the first radio novelist," died in a hospital near his home on Sanibel Island, Fla. Mr. Shepherd spent 21 years on 50,000-watt WOR-AM in New York City, attracting a large following along the Eastern seaboard.
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BUSINESS
Gus G. Sentementes | July 24, 2012
Kim Morton was vacationing with her husband and two kids on Sanibel island in Florida two weeks ago and was passing the time in the ocean looking for sand dollars with her toes. Suddenly, she came across something very smooth -- unnaturally smooth. She used her feet to pick it up and bring it to the surface and discovered it was an iPhone. "It had little, tiny barnacles growing on it," Morton said. It still worked. It was in some type of protective case she wasn't familiar with.
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BUSINESS
Gus G. Sentementes | July 24, 2012
Kim Morton was vacationing with her husband and two kids on Sanibel island in Florida two weeks ago and was passing the time in the ocean looking for sand dollars with her toes. Suddenly, she came across something very smooth -- unnaturally smooth. She used her feet to pick it up and bring it to the surface and discovered it was an iPhone. "It had little, tiny barnacles growing on it," Morton said. It still worked. It was in some type of protective case she wasn't familiar with.
TRAVEL
By Special to the Sun | July 24, 2005
A Memorable Place Sanibel Island rejuvenates its visitors By Linda Rains Allman As my husband and I crossed the causeway from Fort Myers, Fla., to Sanibel Island, I held my breath. Since our last visit, Sanibel and Captiva had been ravaged by Hurricane Charley. Images of ferocious winds and rain haunted me. Would our beloved islands be the same? My parents first started coming to Sanibel in 1986. Last May, our son and daughter-in-law were married on a white beach on the neighboring island of Captiva.
TRAVEL
By Special to the Sun | July 24, 2005
A Memorable Place Sanibel Island rejuvenates its visitors By Linda Rains Allman As my husband and I crossed the causeway from Fort Myers, Fla., to Sanibel Island, I held my breath. Since our last visit, Sanibel and Captiva had been ravaged by Hurricane Charley. Images of ferocious winds and rain haunted me. Would our beloved islands be the same? My parents first started coming to Sanibel in 1986. Last May, our son and daughter-in-law were married on a white beach on the neighboring island of Captiva.
NEWS
By John-Thor Dahlburg and Lianne Hart and John-Thor Dahlburg and Lianne Hart,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 19, 2004
SANIBEL ISLAND, Fla. - This crescent of sand bathed by the warm waters of the Gulf of Mexico is one of Florida's mythic destinations, a magnet for bird-watchers, seashell gatherers and the simply sun-starved. Yesterday, islanders who fled as a hurricane approached were allowed back for the first time, and many came with their heart in their throat. In her home on South Yachtsman Drive, Mary Wolf rushed indoors to see if the wooden canoe handcrafted by her late husband was intact. It was. The other damage caused by Hurricane Charley, including a neighbor's Norfolk pine tree that had landed in her pool, were a minor nuisance.
FEATURES
By Edward M. Eveld and Edward M. Eveld,Knight-Ridder/Tribune | April 5, 1998
She appeared as if out of nowhere, making her way along the deserted beach, a slight figure wearing a straw bonnet tied with a burgundy scarf under her chin. She was gazing down."There's Carol," said Mike Fuery, captain of our 35-minute excursion from Florida's Captiva Island to Cayo Costa, a neighboring barrier island accessible only by boat."She often gives away her finds, so it pays to meet her."We had arrived early, the morning air still chilly, for a few hours of shell collecting. It's a common hobby that can easily turn into an obsession for visitors to Sanibel and Captiva islands off Florida's southwest coast.
NEWS
November 26, 2006
Mr. and Mrs. Brian and Lisa Snider and Mr. and Mrs. Luis and Kimberly Pereyra have the pleasure of announcing the marriage of their daughter Erin Melissa Snider to James Alexander Fogarty Sunday, the Twelfth of November Two Thousand and Six Sanibel Island, Florida
NEWS
June 23, 2005
MARGARET A. Mc CORMICK, 63, of Fort Myers, FL., passed away unexpectedly Sunday, June 19, 2005. She has been a resident here since moving from Fallston, Maryland last October. Margaret was a member of Church of the Resurrection serving as a volunteer on various occasions, also volunteering for the Lee County Learning Center, and Ding Darling National Refuge on Sanibel Island. She was a loving and beloved wife, mother, grandmother, daughter, sister and friend to all who knew her who enjoyed doing needle point, traveling and shelling.
NEWS
November 9, 1995
Dr. R. Tucker Abbott, 77, author of more than 30 books on malacology, the study of mollusks, died Friday in Sanibel Island, Fla., after a long illness.Dr. Abbott, director of the Bailey-Matthews Shell Museum since 1992, had previously spent eight years as curator of mollusks at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington.He also worked at the Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia and at the Delaware Museum of Natural History.He had his own publishing company, American Malacologists Inc.Neil Blaney, 73, Ireland's longest-serving lawmaker and a prominent critic of British rule in Northern Ireland, died Wednesday in a Dublin hospital, his family said.
NEWS
By John-Thor Dahlburg and Lianne Hart and John-Thor Dahlburg and Lianne Hart,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 19, 2004
SANIBEL ISLAND, Fla. - This crescent of sand bathed by the warm waters of the Gulf of Mexico is one of Florida's mythic destinations, a magnet for bird-watchers, seashell gatherers and the simply sun-starved. Yesterday, islanders who fled as a hurricane approached were allowed back for the first time, and many came with their heart in their throat. In her home on South Yachtsman Drive, Mary Wolf rushed indoors to see if the wooden canoe handcrafted by her late husband was intact. It was. The other damage caused by Hurricane Charley, including a neighbor's Norfolk pine tree that had landed in her pool, were a minor nuisance.
NEWS
October 17, 1999
Jean Shepherd, 78, the prolific radio raconteur whose easy storytelling style earned comparisons to fellow Midwesterner Mark Twain, died early yesterday. Mr. Shepherd, described by media critic Marshall McLuhan as "the first radio novelist," died in a hospital near his home on Sanibel Island, Fla. Mr. Shepherd spent 21 years on 50,000-watt WOR-AM in New York City, attracting a large following along the Eastern seaboard.
FEATURES
By Edward M. Eveld and Edward M. Eveld,Knight-Ridder/Tribune | April 5, 1998
She appeared as if out of nowhere, making her way along the deserted beach, a slight figure wearing a straw bonnet tied with a burgundy scarf under her chin. She was gazing down."There's Carol," said Mike Fuery, captain of our 35-minute excursion from Florida's Captiva Island to Cayo Costa, a neighboring barrier island accessible only by boat."She often gives away her finds, so it pays to meet her."We had arrived early, the morning air still chilly, for a few hours of shell collecting. It's a common hobby that can easily turn into an obsession for visitors to Sanibel and Captiva islands off Florida's southwest coast.
NEWS
November 2, 2004
Alfred Goodrich Bradley, retired president of a trucking business, died Saturday of complications after surgery in July at Tampa General Hospital in Tampa, Fla. He was 74 and had lived for many years in the Woodbrook section of Baltimore County. Born in Baltimore and raised in Tuscany-Canterbury, he was a 1948 graduate of Boys' Latin School, where he played lacrosse. He earned a business degree from the University of Maryland, College Park, and was a lieutenant in the Air Force. Beginning in 1961, Mr. Bradley was affiliated with Dabar Haulage in Bayonne, N.J. and later became the firm's president.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN | October 15, 2008
Otho James Haynie, a retired American Totalisator Co. engineer and accomplished woodworker, died of pneumonia Oct. 8 at St. Joseph Medical Center. He was 90. Mr. Haynie was born in Baltimore and raised in Mount Washington. He was a 1936 graduate of Polytechnic Institute and earned bachelor's degrees in mechanical and electrical engineering from the Johns Hopkins University. During World War II, he served as a lieutenant with an Army Air Forces rescue squadron in Europe. His decorations included the Bronze Star, family members said.
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