Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSani Abacha
IN THE NEWS

Sani Abacha

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 7, 1995
NIGERIA WILL be more isolated in the world community than ever. Hopes had been raised that its dictator, Gen. Sani Abacha, would use the 35th anniversary of independence on Oct. 1 to grant reforms leading to democracy. He used the occasion, instead, to stonewall.Rather than implement the 1993 election by bringing Chief Moshood K. O. Abiola out of prison as interim president; rather than institute speedy and fair new elections; rather than hand over to caretakers, General Abacha claimed power for three more years.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By STEPHANIE HANES and STEPHANIE HANES,SUN REPORTER | April 16, 2006
You Must Set Forth at Dawn By Wole Soyinka Random House / 497 pages / $26.95 The Yoruba god Ogun is never far from Wole Soyinka. The deity's powers of conflict and creativity swirl around the Nobel laureate - in theater, in prison, in the caldron of dictators and rebels and human rights activists that was 20th-century Nigeria. In the first lines of his new memoir, You Must Set Forth at Dawn, Soyinka denies that he is possessed by this god, as he says many have suggested. In fact, Soyinka writes of himself, he is "a closet glutton for tranquillity."
Advertisement
NEWS
July 11, 1995
African-Americans have always had a keen interest in Africa, particularly in sub-Saharan countries of their ancestors. But the degree of their involvement is greater now, which may be PTC another sign of progress in African-Americans' quality of life. It's easier to see beyond their own troubles.As an example, take the May conference that brought 1,000 African-Americans to Senegal to meet with 4,000 African officials and discuss what American blacks can do for Africa. The event was the idea of the Rev. Leon Sullivan, the Philadelphia minister who in the 1960s created a successful national jobs training program called Opportunities Industrialization Centers.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 30, 1999
ABUJA, Nigeria -- In an exuberant ceremony of martial music and marches, Nigeria's military ruler turned over power to an elected leader yesterday, opening an era of civilian government in the nation where one in six Africans lives.Seconds after he was handed a copy of Nigeria's 24-day-old Constitution and 20 years after he stepped down as its military ruler, Olusegun Obasanjo, a retired general, was sworn in as president.After the ceremony, in a symbolic retirement of the military from politics, the outgoing head of state, Gen. Abdulsalam Abubakar, was escorted in a motorcade by the military's highest-ranking officers to his hometown of Minna, about 75 miles west of the capital.
NEWS
By STEPHANIE HANES and STEPHANIE HANES,SUN REPORTER | April 16, 2006
You Must Set Forth at Dawn By Wole Soyinka Random House / 497 pages / $26.95 The Yoruba god Ogun is never far from Wole Soyinka. The deity's powers of conflict and creativity swirl around the Nobel laureate - in theater, in prison, in the caldron of dictators and rebels and human rights activists that was 20th-century Nigeria. In the first lines of his new memoir, You Must Set Forth at Dawn, Soyinka denies that he is possessed by this god, as he says many have suggested. In fact, Soyinka writes of himself, he is "a closet glutton for tranquillity."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 30, 1999
ABUJA, Nigeria -- In an exuberant ceremony of martial music and marches, Nigeria's military ruler turned over power to an elected leader yesterday, opening an era of civilian government in the nation where one in six Africans lives.Seconds after he was handed a copy of Nigeria's 24-day-old Constitution and 20 years after he stepped down as its military ruler, Olusegun Obasanjo, a retired general, was sworn in as president.After the ceremony, in a symbolic retirement of the military from politics, the outgoing head of state, Gen. Abdulsalam Abubakar, was escorted in a motorcade by the military's highest-ranking officers to his hometown of Minna, about 75 miles west of the capital.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 12, 1995
ABIDJAN, Ivory Coast -- In deciding whether to proceed with the execution of one of his country's leading human rights campaigners and authors, Nigeria's military ruler, Gen. Sani Abacha, carefully weighed the possible repercussions.In the weeks before the hanging of opposition figure Ken Saro-Wiwa, the international community had been sending increasingly emphatic signals that his execution would earn Nigeria the world's condemnation.By going ahead anyway with the executions of Mr. Saro-Wiwa, 54, and eight associates, General Abacha seems to have decided that international isolation is less terrifying than the perils of Nigeria's internal politics.
NEWS
June 5, 1997
MAJ. JOHNNY PAUL KOROMA shattered the 1996 accord ending five years of anarchy in Sierra Leone. On May 25, he deposed the elected president, Ahmed Tejan Kabbah, who fled. Major Koroma's troops are children with assault rifles and rebels who launched civil war in 1991.The coup undoes the progress that the poor country of 4.5 million people in West Africa was finally making. It repudiates the 53-nation Organization of African Unity's (OAU) slow march toward stability and democracy in Africa.
NEWS
December 14, 1996
ALL THOSE breakdowns and coups in Africa should not distract from due recognition of progress in Ghana, symbolized by the re-election of an incumbent president, who was a revolutionary dictator before his conversion to democracy,President Jerry Rawlings held an election almost five years after winning a flawed exercise in 1992. This one was fair and free. International observers and local people agreed. The leading opponent, John Kufuor, a well-educated lawyer and businessman, said as much.
NEWS
July 27, 1998
THE WORLD should take Gen. Abdulsalam Abubakar's pledge to restore democracy to Nigeria at face value. Dissidents in Africa's most populous country, accustomed to military strongmen's brutality and duplicity, will not.General Abubakar, who found himself the ruler of the oil-producing country after the June 9 death of dictator Sani Abacha, has laid out a commendable transition to democracy. Abacha-appointed officials were dismissed, political parties created to support him were dissolved and political prisoners were released.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 12, 1995
ABIDJAN, Ivory Coast -- In deciding whether to proceed with the execution of one of his country's leading human rights campaigners and authors, Nigeria's military ruler, Gen. Sani Abacha, carefully weighed the possible repercussions.In the weeks before the hanging of opposition figure Ken Saro-Wiwa, the international community had been sending increasingly emphatic signals that his execution would earn Nigeria the world's condemnation.By going ahead anyway with the executions of Mr. Saro-Wiwa, 54, and eight associates, General Abacha seems to have decided that international isolation is less terrifying than the perils of Nigeria's internal politics.
NEWS
October 7, 1995
NIGERIA WILL be more isolated in the world community than ever. Hopes had been raised that its dictator, Gen. Sani Abacha, would use the 35th anniversary of independence on Oct. 1 to grant reforms leading to democracy. He used the occasion, instead, to stonewall.Rather than implement the 1993 election by bringing Chief Moshood K. O. Abiola out of prison as interim president; rather than institute speedy and fair new elections; rather than hand over to caretakers, General Abacha claimed power for three more years.
NEWS
July 11, 1995
African-Americans have always had a keen interest in Africa, particularly in sub-Saharan countries of their ancestors. But the degree of their involvement is greater now, which may be PTC another sign of progress in African-Americans' quality of life. It's easier to see beyond their own troubles.As an example, take the May conference that brought 1,000 African-Americans to Senegal to meet with 4,000 African officials and discuss what American blacks can do for Africa. The event was the idea of the Rev. Leon Sullivan, the Philadelphia minister who in the 1960s created a successful national jobs training program called Opportunities Industrialization Centers.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 17, 1995
WASHINGTON -- More than a month after the hanging of Nigerian human rights campaigner Ken Saro-Wiwa, the Clinton administration is considering how best to strengthen its campaign to isolate Nigeria's military dictatorship in protest against the execution.The United States has withdrawn its ambassador, suspended Nigeria's application for financial credits, tightened the granting of visas to Nigerians with ties to the military regime of Gen. Sani Abacha, and refused to sell it weapons.But so far the administration has shied away from using what is potentially the most effective weapon, an embargo on Nigerian oil, which generates 95 percent of the government's foreign income.
NEWS
August 2, 1996
CREDIT GEN. SANI ABACHA, Nigeria's military strongman, with the moral leadership that imposed an agreement by DTC Liberia's brutal warlords to disarm and hold elections. All but one of the anarchic Liberian faction chiefs went to Nigeria's capital of Abuja during a meeting of the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) and did not leave until they had signed on.Under this agreement, which is identical to one hatched a year earlier, all factions agree to disarm their 60,000 youthful so-called troops during August and to contest honest elections sometime afterward.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.