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Sandy Koufax

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SPORTS
September 27, 1993
The Mariners' Randy Johnson yesterday joined this list of pitchers who have struck out 300 batters in one season:AMERICAN LEAGUEYear ... Name, Team .............. SO1903 ... Rube Waddell, Phil. ..... 3021904 ... Rube Waddell, Phil. ..... 3491910 ... Walter Johnson, Was. .... 3131912 ... Walter Johnson, Was. .... 3031946 ... Bob Feller, Clev. ....... 3481965 ... Sam McDowell, Clev. ..... 3251970 ... Sam McDowell, Clev. ..... 3041971 ... Mickey Lolich, Det. ..... 3081971 ... Vida Blue, Oak. .....
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SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | November 21, 2008
Wearing an Orioles uniform, Mike Mussina wrote the rough draft of a Hall of Fame resume. But when he became a Yankee, he spent the next eight seasons polishing that resume, building - and even improving - on what he had done early in his career. The fact of the matter is, Mussina bolted on Baltimore and found himself pitching in the postseason for seven of the next eight seasons. Playing on the giant New York stage and pitching in October provided him much-needed exposure. (I'll concede his best postseason performance was actually in 1997.
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SPORTS
December 28, 1999
AwardsAP Athlete of YearPast men's winners1935: Joe Louis, boxing1936: Jesse Owens, track1937: Don Budge, tennis1938: Don Budge, tennis1939: Nile Kinnick, football1940: Tom Harmon, football1941: Joe DiMaggio, baseball1942: Frank Sinkwich, football1943: Gunder Haegg, track1944: Byron Nelson, golf1945: Byron Nelson, golf1946: Glenn Davis, football1947: Johnny Lujack, football1948: Lou Boudreau, baseball1949: Leon Hart, football1950: Jim Konstanty, baseball1951: Dick...
SPORTS
By ROCK KUBATKO | May 1, 2008
Orioles pitcher Adam Loewen had a magnetic resonance imaging on his left elbow after leaving his most recent start in the third inning because of persistent soreness. He also had a CT scan. And while the Orioles prepared to take batting practice Tuesday, Loewen underwent a bone scan on the same arm that came back clear. Are there any more tests out there? Just wait until tomorrow, when the Orioles purchase a home pregnancy kit. If the stick turns blue, Loewen won't return to the rotation for nine months.
SPORTS
By LAURA VECSEY | February 23, 2003
VERO BEACH, Fla. - No sign of Sandy Koufax in Dodgertown yesterday. The tall lefty has made up his mind, and everyone who knows him figures the decision will stand. You could see hard-working Maury Wills conducting bunting drills on a small practice diamond called Maury's Pit. You could see Tommy Lasorda buzzing down Tommy Lasorda Drive in his golf cart, yapping with fans and reporters. You could see palm trees surrounding the acres of practice fields that make up Dodgertown, a huge former air base that the Dodgers have called their spring training home since 1948.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Olesker and By Michael Olesker,Sun Staff | November 10, 2002
Sandy Koufax: A Lefty's Legacy, by Jane Leavy. HarperCollins. 304 pages. $23.95. Among Jews of my baby-boom generation, baseball's Sandy Koufax was a kind of inside joke. Among ourselves, we kvelled over him. But, if a gentile friend mentioned the Dodgers' glorious lefty and his religious heritage, we were apt to strike a nonchalant pose and say, "Koufax? Uh, yeah, he's probably one of the better Jewish ballplayers." As if. As if there were hundreds of others, past and present. As if we could hold aloft Hank Greenberg and Al Rosen and simply keep going forever, instead of digging for the likes of Mike Epstein and Ron Bloomberg and Rod Carew, who was never actually a Jew but at least married one. When you're this desperate for role models, close counts.
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | November 21, 2008
Wearing an Orioles uniform, Mike Mussina wrote the rough draft of a Hall of Fame resume. But when he became a Yankee, he spent the next eight seasons polishing that resume, building - and even improving - on what he had done early in his career. The fact of the matter is, Mussina bolted on Baltimore and found himself pitching in the postseason for seven of the next eight seasons. Playing on the giant New York stage and pitching in October provided him much-needed exposure. (I'll concede his best postseason performance was actually in 1997.
NEWS
By HOWARD KLEINBERG | December 4, 1991
Miami--So, everyone old enough remembers exactly where he was when the news was flashed of the attack on Pearl Harbor, eh? Not quite. Fifty years later, my family is arguing about it.My father insists he was at the Polo Grounds in New York on December 7, 1941, watching a National Football League game between the New York Giants and Green Bay Packers. Until recently, that claim went unchallenged. But several years ago my mother interrupted the telling of his story to claim that both she and he were at my Uncle Charlie's place.
SPORTS
By KEVIN VAN VALKENBURG and KEVIN VAN VALKENBURG,SUN REPORTER | February 28, 2006
Inside Baseball: The Best of Tom Verducci Sports Illustrated Books/318 pages Tom Verducci, a veteran journalist who has been the lead baseball writer for Sports Illustrated since 1993, doesn't really write features or profiles. Instead, he writes epics. This is hardly news to the weekly devotees of SI, who have been quietly raving about Verducci's gifts for some time now. But reading the recently released anthology of his magazine work, Inside Baseball: The Best of Tom Verducci, one can't help but be awed, once again, by the carefully chosen rhythm of Verducci's sentences, and the authority with which he tackles narrative journalism.
SPORTS
By Scott Ostler and Scott Ostler,San Francisco Chronicle | August 30, 1993
Personally, I think the local TV guys calling yesterday's Giants-Marlins game, Barry Tompkins and Mike Krukow, got a little carried away.They likened Giants hurler Salomon Torres to Sandy Koufax and then Vida Blue.Come on, guys. This is the kid's first outing. He throws a nice seven innings and we all go nuts? Sandy Koufax and Vida Blue?Let's get a grip, shall we? Let's keep our poise. I was thinking he reminds me of Whitey Ford and Bob Gibson.And you certainly will not catch me mentioning Torres as a Cy Young candidate.
SPORTS
By KEVIN VAN VALKENBURG and KEVIN VAN VALKENBURG,SUN REPORTER | February 28, 2006
Inside Baseball: The Best of Tom Verducci Sports Illustrated Books/318 pages Tom Verducci, a veteran journalist who has been the lead baseball writer for Sports Illustrated since 1993, doesn't really write features or profiles. Instead, he writes epics. This is hardly news to the weekly devotees of SI, who have been quietly raving about Verducci's gifts for some time now. But reading the recently released anthology of his magazine work, Inside Baseball: The Best of Tom Verducci, one can't help but be awed, once again, by the carefully chosen rhythm of Verducci's sentences, and the authority with which he tackles narrative journalism.
TOPIC
By David Shaw and David Shaw,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 28, 2003
Thanks to Jayson Blair, Howell Raines and several of their colleagues at The New York Times, it would be relatively easy to compile a Times-only list for this year's report on the worst moments in American journalism. But as another famous, unindicted co-conspirator once said, "It would be wrong." Well, OK, maybe it wouldn't be wrong. I mean, just look at the year that was on West 43rd Street: Blair's serial fabrications. Raines' arrogant reign and forced resignation. Publisher Arthur Sulzberger's bullying The Washington Post into leaving their partnership at The International Herald Tribune.
SPORTS
By LAURA VECSEY | February 23, 2003
VERO BEACH, Fla. - No sign of Sandy Koufax in Dodgertown yesterday. The tall lefty has made up his mind, and everyone who knows him figures the decision will stand. You could see hard-working Maury Wills conducting bunting drills on a small practice diamond called Maury's Pit. You could see Tommy Lasorda buzzing down Tommy Lasorda Drive in his golf cart, yapping with fans and reporters. You could see palm trees surrounding the acres of practice fields that make up Dodgertown, a huge former air base that the Dodgers have called their spring training home since 1948.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Olesker and By Michael Olesker,Sun Staff | November 10, 2002
Sandy Koufax: A Lefty's Legacy, by Jane Leavy. HarperCollins. 304 pages. $23.95. Among Jews of my baby-boom generation, baseball's Sandy Koufax was a kind of inside joke. Among ourselves, we kvelled over him. But, if a gentile friend mentioned the Dodgers' glorious lefty and his religious heritage, we were apt to strike a nonchalant pose and say, "Koufax? Uh, yeah, he's probably one of the better Jewish ballplayers." As if. As if there were hundreds of others, past and present. As if we could hold aloft Hank Greenberg and Al Rosen and simply keep going forever, instead of digging for the likes of Mike Epstein and Ron Bloomberg and Rod Carew, who was never actually a Jew but at least married one. When you're this desperate for role models, close counts.
FEATURES
By Tom Davidson and Tom Davidson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 10, 2001
My kid brother and I were sharing our Sunday morning with 5,000 or so Mary Kay Cosmetics saleswomen. We were at a baseball park -- Minneapolis' Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome -- in the fall of 1987, watching a game that could clinch a playoff berth for our beloved Minnesota Twins for the first time since my brother was in kindergarten. Of course, months earlier, the rational business minds in the Twins ticket office couldn't have predicted that possibility. Last home game of the year? For a team that hadn't finished above .500 since the Pleistocene era?
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | January 17, 2001
One was an obvious choice. The other a sentimental favorite. But both Dave Winfield and Kirby Puckett reached the Hall of Fame the same way - by playing winning baseball and putting up the kind of numbers that could not be ignored by the voting members of the Baseball Writers' Association of America. Winfield, whose career spanned 22 years and six teams, was named on 84.5 percent of the ballots in his first year of eligibility. No surprise after a career that featured 3,110 hits, 465 home runs and five Gold Gloves for his sometimes spectacular play in the outfield.
NEWS
By Gregory N. Krolczyk | September 22, 1991
/TC DNEEDFUL THINGS: THE LASTCASTLE ROCK STORY.Stephen King.Viking640 pages. $24.95. Being a small town, Castle Rock, Maine, was abuzz with gossip about the new store, Needful Things. It was supposed to open soon, but no delivery trucks had been seen. And the name Needful Things . . . why, that could mean almost anything. It was probably, speculation said, just another trashy tourist trap.The first person in Castle Rock (location of several other Stephen King stories, including "Dead Zone," "Cujo," "The Body," "The Dark Half" and "The Sun Dog")
SPORTS
By Jim Henneman and Jim Henneman,Sun Staff Writer | June 7, 1995
It took one pitch in the All-Star Game here two years ago for John Kruk to find out who was the most intimidating pitcher in baseball.But nobody then was quite ready to say that Randy Johnson was the best in the game. That has changed, as the Orioles were reminded Monday night at Camden Yards."He's not just the most intimidating, he's the best pitcher in baseball," Seattle manager Lou Piniella said without fear of contradiction. "He doesn't just throw it up there 95 miles per hour -- he knows what he's doing, and he throws strikes."
SPORTS
December 28, 1999
AwardsAP Athlete of YearPast men's winners1935: Joe Louis, boxing1936: Jesse Owens, track1937: Don Budge, tennis1938: Don Budge, tennis1939: Nile Kinnick, football1940: Tom Harmon, football1941: Joe DiMaggio, baseball1942: Frank Sinkwich, football1943: Gunder Haegg, track1944: Byron Nelson, golf1945: Byron Nelson, golf1946: Glenn Davis, football1947: Johnny Lujack, football1948: Lou Boudreau, baseball1949: Leon Hart, football1950: Jim Konstanty, baseball1951: Dick...
SPORTS
By John Steadman | May 30, 1999
Much is different from the norm and what's perceived as the conventional, even if he is does have an excuse. After all, he's left-handed. Matt Riley has rings on his ears, eyebrows and tongue, tattoos on each shoulder and a funk haircut. He also is the most promising pitcher, plus being the most expensive, in the entire minor-league system of the Orioles.Such personal affectations (it was impossible to discern if he had bells on his toes) stimulate Riley conversation and give Riley the appearance of being a lead guitar player in a hard-rock band.
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