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SPORTS
By Mike Preston | September 20, 1991
Injured Maryland quarterback Jim Sandwisch will not start tomorrow's game against West Virginia at Byrd Stadium, two sources on the football team said yesterday.Neither Maryland coach Joe Krivak nor Sandwisch would comment yesterday, as Sandwisch practiced only lightly, and the Terps concluded their heavy workouts for the week.Sandwisch, a 6-foot-3, 190-pound senior who has completed 29 of 49 passes for 212 yards but has thrown two interceptions, threw a couple of passes yesterday.Junior John Kaleo, a 5-11, 190-pound All-American from Montgomery College-Rockville, will start in Sandwisch's place.
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SPORTS
By Bill Tanton | December 10, 1991
There are a few special people who form the fiber of a sports community. They do everything -- play, coach, officiate, administer programs -- and they do it for a long, long time.In Baltimore, Herb Armstrong, Johnny Neun and Paul Menton, all deceased now, filled those roles for decades.Last weekend our town lost the last of that breed when Sterling "Sheriff" Fowble died. He would have been 77 in February.Sheriff coached amateur baseball here for 46 years. His Gordon Stores and Harbor Federal teams were tops.
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SPORTS
By Doug Brown and Doug Brown,Evening Sun Staff | September 6, 1991
COLLEGE PARK -- Coach Joe Krivak believes the tale is instructive, that it provides an insight into the character of the quarterback who will lead Maryland's football team this season.In 1989, when Jim Sandwisch was still a walk-on in his third season with the Terps, he was the holder for extra points and field goals and the backup punter. Because he had an accounting class at 4:30 p.m., he made a habit of coming early to practice at 3:15 to hold for the kickers for 15 minutes, then showered, dressed and went to class.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston | November 26, 1991
Maryland athletic director Andy Geiger met with football coach Joe Krivak yesterday morning to evaluate the program, but details of the discussion were not available.Krivak, 56, in the first year of a four-year contract worth $94,000 a year, left after the meeting for an afternoon flight to Macon, Ga., where he was a guest speaker for a touchdown club.Geiger, who renewed Krivak's contract at the end of last season, said little but repeated that there was no deadline for ending the evaluation.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,Sun Staff Correspondent | September 19, 1991
COLLEGE PARK -- Barring a major recovery, injured University of Maryland senior quarterback Jim Sandwisch will not play in Saturday's game against West Virginia at Byrd Stadium.Also, senior starting halfback Troy Jackson is questionable after slightly pulling a left hamstring in practice yesterday.Sandwisch, the Terps starter, practiced only lightly yesterday and did not throw for the third time this week. Head coach Joe Krivak said Tuesday that if Sandwisch did not practice yesterday, he probably would not play.
SPORTS
By Doug Brown and Doug Brown,Evening Sun Staff | September 17, 1991
COLLEGE PARK -- This isn't a budding quarterback controversy developing at Maryland. It's simply a matter of Jim Sandwisch's health.There is nothing Sandwisch and coach Joe Krivak would like better than for the senior quarter-back to start against West Virginia here Saturday. Whether he will be able to depends not on anything John Kaleo, the No. 2, does or doesn't do in practice but solely on Sandwisch himself.The fifth-year senior from Great Mills in southern Maryland didn't practice yesterday because of a 100-degree fever and a throat infection.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,Sun Staff Correspondent | September 17, 1991
COLLEGE PARK -- The Jim Sandwisch Watch was uneventful yesterday.Sandwisch, 6 feet 3, 206 pounds, the University of Maryland's starting quarterback who injured his throwing arm Saturday in a 31-17 loss to Syracuse, did not practice yesterday as the Terps (1-1) went through a light workout. Maryland plays West Virginia (2-1) Saturday at Byrd Stadium.Sandwisch, a first-year senior starter, re-injured the elbow and shoulder of his right throwing arm Saturday night and was replaced by junior college All-American John Kaleo to start the second half.
SPORTS
By Doug Brown and Doug Brown,Evening Sun Staff | August 19, 1991
COLLEGE PARK -- It is unclear at this early stage whether there truly is a battle for Maryland's starting quarterback job.Some signs point to fifth-year senior but untested Jim Sandwisch as No. 1. Junior college transfer John Kaleo says he hopes the coaches will keep their minds open these next three weeks before the Sept. 7 opener against Virginia. Redshirt freshman Tony Scarpino feels he will one day take the helm, although he acknowledges he still has some growing up to do.Coach Joe Krivak is guarded on the subject.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,Sun Staff Correspondent | February 12, 1991
COLLEGE PARK -- Neil O'Donnell, the former University of Maryland quarterback now with the Pittsburgh Steelers, strode across the lounge to a table at which current Terps quarterback Jimmy Sandwisch, a former walk-on, was sitting."
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Doug Brown and Mike Preston and Doug Brown,Sun Staff Correspondents | September 22, 1991
-- COLLEGE PARK -- Even though three quarterbacks played in Maryland's 37-7 loss to West Virginia at Byrd Stadium yesterday, there will be no quarterback controversy for the Terps.Senior Jim Sandwisch still is No. 1."Everyone felt that after this week, his shoulder and arm are going to be OK," said Maryland coach Joe Krivak. "I felt that if he recovers, he is going to be a guy that is going to play a lot. Jimmy is still the starter."Sandwisch, a senior who started the first two games, didn't start yesterday's because of a sore right elbow and shoulder.
SPORTS
By Doug Brown and Doug Brown,Evening Sun Staff | November 13, 1991
COLLEGE PARK -- Jim Sandwisch was struggling to his feet after being driven out of bounds by a Penn State tackler when he heard the cutting remark."Hit him harder," a Maryland fan bellowed. "Maybe he'll play harder."Such is the abuse heaped on the quarterback of a Maryland team that is 2-7. With two games left, the first one Saturday at No. 15 Clemson, Sandwisch is holding up under the sniping "pretty well" by relying on his family and teammates for moral support."Win together, lose together," Sandwisch said.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 30, 1991
COLLEGE PARK -- Maryland starting quarterback Jim Sandwisch, his body hurting and heart heavy, sat in a chair Saturday afternoon in the football building for nearly 30 minutes answering questions about perhaps the worst performance in his career. Maryland had lost again, this time to Duke, and Sandwisch was intercepted four times.When Sandwisch had finished answering the questions, he walked over to his mother, kissed her, and they walked hand in hand out of the building. Alone. There were no autograph seekers, fans or well-wishers.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 27, 1991
COLLEGE PARK -- It hasn't been a pretty season for Maryland. The Terps either win ugly, or lose ugly.Yesterday, Duke had two long passes -- including one for a touchdown -- nullified by penalties, missed a 22-yard field goal, had a long drive stopped because of a fumble and threw two interceptions.And Maryland still lost, 17-13, before a homecoming crowd of 35,423 at Byrd Stadium.Why? Because in this season that the Terps (2-5 overall, 2-2 Atlantic Coast Conference) would like to forget, the offense was inconsistent again, and so was the pass defense.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 20, 1991
WINSTON SALEM, N.C. -- This was supposed to have been a breather for the University of Maryland. Instead, it came close to taking the air out of the Terps for the remainder of the 1991 season.Maryland quarterback Jim Sandwisch completed a 35-yard touchdown pass to H-back Frank Wycheck with 1 minute, 34 seconds left in the game to allow the injury-marred Terps to escape with a 23-22 victory over Wake Forest yesterday before 17,342 at Groves Stadium. Maryland went for two points, sending Troy Jackson wide right, and he was stopped.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 13, 1991
ATLANTA -- Quarterback Jim Sandwisch played poorly and was benched in the fourth quarter. His receivers dropped a lot of passes, and the running backs failed to pick up blitzes. The defense was just as bad, especially the secondary, which gave up several long passes and two touchdowns. There were also six penalties for 68 yards.At least it was a total team effort for Maryland.The Terps were blown out for the second time this season yesterday, losing, 34-10, to Georgia Tech in an Atlantic Coast Conference game before 42,011 at Bobby Dodd Stadium/Grant Field.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 6, 1991
PITTSBURGH -- Despite inconsistency in yesterday's 24-20 loss to No. 17 Pittsburgh at Pitt Stadium, Maryland's passing offense was the best it has been all season.The Terps (1-3) passed for 229 yards as quarterback Jim Sandwisch completed 22 of 47 for 230 yards. Maryland also got its wide receivers involved, as they accounted for nine catches for 157 yards. The Terps finally got big-play specialist Gene Thomas into the offense.Thomas had three receptions for 29 yards. Wide-out Marcus Badgett had two receptions for 70 yards, including a 58-yard touchdown catch.
SPORTS
By Doug Brown and Doug Brown,Evening Sun Staff | November 13, 1991
COLLEGE PARK -- Jim Sandwisch was struggling to his feet after being driven out of bounds by a Penn State tackler when he heard the cutting remark."Hit him harder," a Maryland fan bellowed. "Maybe he'll play harder."Such is the abuse heaped on the quarterback of a Maryland team that is 2-7. With two games left, the first one Saturday at No. 15 Clemson, Sandwisch is holding up under the sniping "pretty well" by relying on his family and teammates for moral support."Win together, lose together," Sandwisch said.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 30, 1991
COLLEGE PARK -- Maryland starting quarterback Jim Sandwisch, his body hurting and heart heavy, sat in a chair Saturday afternoon in the football building for nearly 30 minutes answering questions about perhaps the worst performance in his career. Maryland had lost again, this time to Duke, and Sandwisch was intercepted four times.When Sandwisch had finished answering the questions, he walked over to his mother, kissed her, and they walked hand in hand out of the building. Alone. There were no autograph seekers, fans or well-wishers.
SPORTS
By Doug Brown and Doug Brown,Evening Sun Staff | October 3, 1991
COLLEGE PARK -- It was an old friend, Maryland ticket manager Jack Zane, who phoned Jerry Eisaman with the news that Joe Krivak was looking for a quarterbacks coach.Steve Axman had left for Northern Arizona University and Krivak, the head coach with one year left on his contract, was in no position to make promises. He needed a man willing to take a chance.Did Eisaman want a job that might evaporate in a year? During their interview, Krivak offered him the position and then drove him to the airport.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Doug Brown and Mike Preston and Doug Brown,Sun Staff Correspondents | September 22, 1991
-- COLLEGE PARK -- Even though three quarterbacks played in Maryland's 37-7 loss to West Virginia at Byrd Stadium yesterday, there will be no quarterback controversy for the Terps.Senior Jim Sandwisch still is No. 1."Everyone felt that after this week, his shoulder and arm are going to be OK," said Maryland coach Joe Krivak. "I felt that if he recovers, he is going to be a guy that is going to play a lot. Jimmy is still the starter."Sandwisch, a senior who started the first two games, didn't start yesterday's because of a sore right elbow and shoulder.
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