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ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard,
For The Baltimore Sun
| June 12, 2013
The sandwich's simple format offers unlimited options for culinary creativity. At Woody's Hitching Post - deep in Monkton's pastoral horse country - chef-owner David "Woody" Woodruff is busy exploring those options - to the great benefit of his customers. Woodruff opened his eponymous shop last summer, leaving behind a career in commercial real estate (he had restaurant experience from his younger days). It's a simple spot - bare-bones decor, handwritten signs advertising the menu, a handful of tables and an open, diner-style kitchen - but that keeps the focus on the food and on Woodruff's friendly personality.
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NEWS
Dan Rodricks | August 30, 2014
Like Thanksgiving, Labor Day is a national holiday. Unlike Thanksgiving, it does not have an official meal. One-hundred-and-twenty years on, it's time we had one. I'm nominating the peppers-and-eggs sandwich as the official meal of Labor Day, and I'll tell you why in a moment. First, some declarations. 1. Most people only think of Labor Day as a day off at the end of summer, or a good day to buy a dishwasher. Lost is its original meaning: a "national tribute to the contributions workers have made to the strength, prosperity and well-being of our country.
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EXPLORE
By Phil Grout | January 28, 2013
Most days, the college trained chemist analyzes the wastewater from the Westminster treatment plant before it's discharged into Big Pipe Creek. But once a month, acting on his Christian faith, Richard Yoder and his wife, Sonya, set up on the lawn in front of Kohn Creative in the old Westminster Post Office at 83 East Main Street. There, they hand out sack lunches of peanut-butter-and-jelly sandwiches, chips and lemonade. During the cold weather, they provide hot soup and cocoa in addition to the PB&J.
NEWS
Kit Waskom Pollard and For The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2014
Football season is upon us, and with it, tailgates. This year, think outside the traditional burger-and-dog grilling session with Bird's Nest Barbecue owner Tim Brown's gooey Cuban sandwiches, served Maryland-style, with pit ham and pulled pork.  Brown piles sourdough bread high with Swiss cheese, pickles, spicy mustard and, of course, pit ham and pulled pork butt, grilling the sandwiches until they are warm, messy and delicious - perfect fuel...
FEATURES
By Sherrie Clinton | July 17, 1991
Take These delicious sandwiches on your next picnic.Tasty chicken salad,made with nonfat yogurt,is stuffed inside pita bread for a portable lunch or dinner.This recipe from the National Broiler Council is also a great way to use leftover chicken.Pita Chicken Sandwiches4 boneless, skinless chicken breasts, about 1 1/4 pounds2 tablespoons olive oil1 medium onion, sliced thin1 teaspoon salt1/2 teaspoon pepper1 tablespoon wine vinegar1 1/2 teaspoons chopped chives1/2 cup nonfat plain yogurt1 small cucumber, shredded, about 1/2 cup4 slices pita bread, 8-inch sizeIn nonstick pan, pour olive oil. Heat about two minutes on medium temperature.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Houser III, Special To The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2011
Every community needs a cafe — a spot to grab a quick (and cheap) bite to eat, meet with friends for coffee or read a paper in peace. In Bolton Hill, that place is On the Hill Cafe. At the corner of John and Mosher streets, On the Hill Cafe has been serving sandwiches and breakfast for five years. Owned by George and Jessica Dailey, who also run Centro Tapas in South Baltimore, this cafe has become a mainstay in and around Bolton Hill. At first sight, On the Hill Cafe has an early '90s coffeehouse-meets-sub-shop look, which, after a little observation, gives way to a warmer, more local vibe.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Allison Brickell, For The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2013
There's nothing wrong with slapping together some bread, mayo and turkey in the days following Thanksgiving . But eating what seems like an endless stream of cold sandwiches after the holiday can get a bit dull. So avoid getting stuck in the boring leftovers rut; these recipes from local chefs and food experts will make creative use of your post-Thanksgiving fixings. John Shields John Shields is a fixture at his restaurant, Gertrude's. But not on Thanksgiving - that's his time to relax and enjoy reconnecting with family.
FEATURES
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | May 5, 2007
A few months ago, at a cocktail party, I wasn't paying much attention to the food being passed, when suddenly a dish caught my eye. I looked at a platter of what appeared to be miniature grilled cheese sandwiches served with a sauce. "I'll have one of those!" I quickly told the server, but I didn't stop at one. Three sandwiches later, I caught up with the waitress and asked about these addictive little morsels. They're one of our catering firm's favorite dishes, she replied. I didn't waste any time getting to the kitchen, where I discovered that the chef, Deb Snow, a friend of mine, was the inspiration behind these small gems.
FEATURES
By Pat Dailey and Pat Dailey,Chicago Tribune | August 30, 1992
Sandwiches are a good solution for casual, late summer meals. They're lighter than many meals, and they have a free form that invites the cook to improvise at will.If sandwiches once were reserved for lunch boxes and family-only suppers, those rules no longer apply. Sandwiches now are approached with a creative hand. These chicken breasts, bathed in a summery sauce, are grilled and layered together with cheese and tomatoes. Other vegetables can be added as well.A typical summer cole slaw takes a creative turn with the addition of lentils, which offer appealing texture as well as a peppery bite.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | November 19, 2000
Although I love to cook Thanksgiving dinner, I have to confess to enjoying post-Thanksgiving meals even more. At a farmers' market where a baker was selling ciabatta, I realized this Italian country bread could be used to make sandwiches known as panini that can be filled with all manner of ingredients. I decided to make a Thanksgiving version. Today's recipe yields four servings, but you can double or triple the ingredients as needed. These robust sandwiches can stand on their own or with a bowl of soup or a salad.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2014
Barbara Block of Berrien Springs, Mich., was searching for a recipe for Rice Krispies treat ice cream bars that she said were very popular in the 1960s. Rose Barnes of South Bend, Ind., sent in a recipe that she started making years ago with her children and now enjoys making with her grandkids. She was sure it was the one Block was looking for. Kellogg's Rice Krispies cereal hit store shelves in the 1920s and was a success with adults. However, the breakfast cereal's real popularity with kids didn't come until more than a decade later, when Rice Krispies treats were created by a Kellogg's employee, Mildred Day. She mixed the cereal with butter and marshmallows, and an instant sensation was born . This recipe is proof that Rice Krispie treats can be easily adapted and used in many different ways, and are surely as popular today as they have always been.
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2014
Serving "British fare with an American accent," The Corner Pantry is now open in Lake Falls Village. The Corner Pantry is from former Bond Street Social executive chef Neill Howell, a native of Colchester, England, who co-owns the cafe with his wife, Emily Howell. British specialties are on the breakfast menu, where there are crumpets, scones and sausage rolls, and on the daily menu, where there's a listing of "sarnies," a popular term in the northern United Kingdom for bacon sandwiches in particular and sandwiches in general.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | December 25, 2013
Four-year-old Kate Grossman held out the white paper bag, one of the 500 she and her two siblings were handing out to the needy at Our Daily Bread's downtown employment center on Christmas Day. But the woman approaching smiled and shook her head. "I just want a hug," she said. Without hesitation, all three Grossmans rushed forward for a group embrace that brought the woman to tears. The Grossmans were among the 600 or so who took part in the ninth annual Mitzvah Day, preparing gifts at the Jewish Community Center in Pikesville and taking them to charities around the city.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Andrew Conrad, aconrad@tribune.com | December 1, 2013
Whoa! There is a ton of heavy stuff to discuss from Sunday night's midseason finale of "The Walking Dead" on AMC, but first, a serious question: Is the Governor really dead? I know that we saw him get stabbed through the center of the back and chest with Michonne's Shinobi sword, and then we saw Lilly stand over him and fire her gun in the direction of his head. But we never actually saw him die. I've learned that in shows like these - "The Walking Dead", " Magnum, P.I. ", " Legends of the Hidden Temple " - that a character isn't actually dead and gone until we see their rotten, decomposing carcass.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Allison Brickell, For The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2013
There's nothing wrong with slapping together some bread, mayo and turkey in the days following Thanksgiving . But eating what seems like an endless stream of cold sandwiches after the holiday can get a bit dull. So avoid getting stuck in the boring leftovers rut; these recipes from local chefs and food experts will make creative use of your post-Thanksgiving fixings. John Shields John Shields is a fixture at his restaurant, Gertrude's. But not on Thanksgiving - that's his time to relax and enjoy reconnecting with family.
FEATURES
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2013
As a child, chef and cooking instructor Nikki McGowan of CKCS Foods Studio loved Thanksgiving. “Thanksgiving holds for me my fondest culinary memories,” she says. “The smell of pumpkin pie spice reminds me of my mom every time I encounter it.” However, Nikki's memories of the day after Thanksgiving aren't so pleasant: She dreaded the return of dry, bland leftover turkey sandwiches. Here, she punches up the traditional post-Thanksgiving sandwich with a healthy smear of cream cheese and dollops of tart cranberry sauce and orange marmalade.
NEWS
By Sylvia Rector and Sylvia Rector,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 5, 2003
Sandwiches, in case you haven't noticed, aren't what they used to be. Classier, more creative and much, much tastier than the meat-in-white-bread lunchbox fodder of childhood, they've been reinvented and redefined. Today, their breads are better. Their fillings are fabulous. And they're being served in tantalizing combinations that are spread with a whole new attitude. At the Rattlesnake Club in downtown Detroit, you can lunch on a $24 grilled shrimp sandwich -- five jumbo shrimp topped with fresh cilantro and mango-pepper salsa on scallion focaccia bread with lemon-grass aioli.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Matthew F. Lallo, Special To The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2012
Open only since last month, Luigi's Italian Deli in Hampden avoids any of the missteps that invariably are part of a new restaurant. Luigi's, and several of the small restaurants on 36th Street in Hampden, aka The Avenue, belie the old adage that patrons are reluctant to walk up stairs to a restaurant. At the top of these steps is a pleasant porch furnished with four tiny tables. Sipping a Blood Orange Pellegrino and tackling one of the specialty sandwiches makes scaling a few steps a small price to pay. There is also a spacious patio out back.
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | October 14, 2013
What does "Arrested Development" star Jeffrey Tambor eat when he's in town? Crab cakes from Faidley's? Corned beef from Attman's? Turns out the actor, who plays George Bluth Sr. on the show, had a craving for a sandwich from the deli at Eddie's of Mount Vernon. Tambor gave a talk Saturday as part of University of Maryland Baltimore County's homecoming celebration, and swung by Eddie's afterward.  Liam Flynn, proprietor of the Station North ale house that bears his name -- and also an "Arrested Development" fan --spotted Tambor's shiny black car and security detail in front of the neighborhood grocery store.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2013
William N. Gill Sr., founder of the Village Sub Shop chain that had numerous sites in the city and Baltimore County and later included the Steak & Rib Restaurant, died Saturday of a heart attack at his Lutherville home. He was 82. William Norton Gill Sr., who was born and raised in the former 10th Ward in Baltimore, graduated in 1950 from Mount St. Joseph High School in Irvington. He later worked for the old State Roads Commission and was a frozen food salesman. While sitting in a shopping center one day, Mr. Gill realized it would be the perfect location for a pizza shop.
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