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Sandwich Generation

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NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,SUN STAFF | June 3, 1996
Like many of his constituents, Baltimore County Del. Michael J. Finifter is a member of the "sandwich generation" -- with two young children and aging parents.He realizes he could get caught in the cross fire of providing care for all of them at the same time in coming years. And he knows that many other people face the same issue in Baltimore County, which has the largest population of elderly people in the state.With that in mind, Finifter is forming a task force to examine issues faced by middle-generation care givers and to develop ways to help.
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NEWS
By Andrew L. Yarrow and Kevin J. Sullivan | August 6, 2012
The way politicians talk, one would think that the only issues that matter to Americans over 55 or 60 are Social Security and Medicare. Of course, the future of these programs is enormously important to the well-being of older citizens (and everyone else who one day will be old), and their runaway costs threaten the nation's long-term budgetary health. But most of the 60 million Americans between the ages of 55 and 75 have other things on their minds than what will happen to these two huge entitlement programs.
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FEATURES
By Niki Scott and Niki Scott,Universal Press Syndicate | August 2, 1992
Chris was eating a sandwich when I asked how it feels to be part of the sandwich generation. "Like this," she said, tearing it into ragged pieces. "I'm torn all the time between the people who need me."My father died five years ago. My mother is diabetic and has had a mild stroke. She's determined to go on living by herself; she says if she had to go to a nursing home she'd just curl up and die.`I try to call her a couple of times from work. Then I go over after work every day to bring her groceries, fix her supper, do her dishes and get her settled in for the night.
NEWS
August 14, 2010
Sunday, Aug. 15 'Crazy for You' The Talent Machine Company closes out its summer season with the musical comedy "Crazy for You" at 2 p.m. in the Key Auditorium at St. John's College, 60 College Ave. in Annapolis. Tickets are $10. Information: 410-956-0512. Harvest Swap & Stream Ecology Share and swap tomatoes, herbs and other homegrown foods with other gardeners and explore Towser's Branch to find animals that live in the stream from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. at Hammond's Connection at the Dairy Farm, 100 Dairy Lane, Gambrills.
NEWS
By Andrew L. Yarrow and Kevin J. Sullivan | August 6, 2012
The way politicians talk, one would think that the only issues that matter to Americans over 55 or 60 are Social Security and Medicare. Of course, the future of these programs is enormously important to the well-being of older citizens (and everyone else who one day will be old), and their runaway costs threaten the nation's long-term budgetary health. But most of the 60 million Americans between the ages of 55 and 75 have other things on their minds than what will happen to these two huge entitlement programs.
NEWS
By Ghita Levine | December 11, 1990
IT'S NO SECRET that the American population is aging. You have only to watch the nightly television news to see commercials pitching investment services to golden-agers or undergarments to folks with poor bladder control.Or read the newspapers to observe the struggle over Medicare, prompted because more older people are using more health care services every year. Or observe the number of elderly shoppers in the Rotunda Giant between 9 and 5 any weekday.What is this aging population like compared to, say, 10 years ago?
NEWS
By Traci A. Johnson and Traci A. Johnson,Staff Writer | November 4, 1992
While picking up shells on the beach todayI found a fragment of what must have beena magnificent conch . . .an exquisite shard . . .a remnant of a masterpiece.When Phyllis S. Yingling wrote these words, she could have been describing the daily routine of the South Carroll Adult Day Care Center staff.Each day the social workers, nurses and therapists handle individuals whose experience and wisdom they cherish as much as they would treasure priceless art."These are people who have had very rich, full lives and are survivors, if nothing else," said Judy Carpenter, a registered nurse and the center's director.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE | May 28, 2008
There have been whispers that the very popular Miss Shirley's Cafe in Roland Park was planning to have a second location downtown, and now they're confirmed. Sometime late this summer, the new Miss Shirley's will open adjacent to the lobby of the 750 E. Pratt St. office building. The target date is mid- to late August. There will be seating for 90 and a carryout window. At first, Miss Shirley's will stick to what made the first location such a success, offering elaborate breakfast and lunch items (from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. weekdays)
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Staff Writer | November 10, 1992
The United States' elderly population is aging as a group, with the frail, 85-plus segment growing fastest, says a U.S. Census Bureau report being released today.However, contrary to the stereotype of the doddering elderly, most of the nation's 31 million old people enjoy good health and a decent standard of living, the report says.It isn't until Americans reach their mid-80s that most are either in nursing homes or need help with everyday activities, the study shows."We tend to treat the elderly as if they were a homogeneous population, but they are really very different," says Cynthia Taeuber, author of "Sixty-Five Plus in America."
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | February 25, 1996
I AM A MEMBER of the "sandwich generation," and my families -- the one I came from and the one I made, as Hillary Clinton would describe them -- have taken so many bites out of me during the last couple of weeks that there isn't enough of me left to feed the dog under the table.My husband left town on an extended business trip, my children have missed so much school because of poor weather and poor health that they no longer can read, and my sainted mother had the nerve to become gravely ill in a northern city during the worst winter in common memory.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE | May 28, 2008
There have been whispers that the very popular Miss Shirley's Cafe in Roland Park was planning to have a second location downtown, and now they're confirmed. Sometime late this summer, the new Miss Shirley's will open adjacent to the lobby of the 750 E. Pratt St. office building. The target date is mid- to late August. There will be seating for 90 and a carryout window. At first, Miss Shirley's will stick to what made the first location such a success, offering elaborate breakfast and lunch items (from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. weekdays)
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,Sun Reporter | July 15, 2007
Aging can be a scary process for Baby Boomers. But aging while also raising children, preparing for retirement, staying healthy and tending to an elderly loved one can be an unexpected and overwhelming nightmare. It doesn't have to be quite so frightening, though. Not according to Marion Somers, a nationally-recognized geriatric care specialist and author of recently published Elder Care Made Easier: Doctor Marion's 10 Steps to Help You Care for an Aging Loved One. From creating better communication skills to navigating complicated financial issues, Somers covers a wide range of topics that can help individuals become quasi-experts on caregiving while also including several suggestions on how to prevent such duties from taking its toll on families.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,SUN STAFF | November 9, 2003
Even when they were ailing, Betty and Alvin Ford refused to talk about their son's future. So when the elderly Mount Washington couple died - little more than a year apart - all responsibility for David Ford fell on his sister's shoulders. Mary-Jo Dale loves her brother. But she was ill-prepared to be the sole provider and caregiver to a middle-aged man who, because of a developmental disability (and perhaps his parents' protective instincts) had lived his life as a virtual child, never holding a job or living on his own. "I had tried to talk to my parents.
NEWS
By Don O'Briant and Don O'Briant,Cox News Service | April 6, 2003
They were the generation of women who broke down the barriers to traditionally male professions. They were told they could have it all and, in some cases, they did. Now these 40 million female baby boomers are hitting middle age, and many are facing confusion about everything from their relationships to their careers. "This definitely is not our mothers' midlife," says Amy Lynch, editor and publisher of the recently launched OurSelves: The Newsletter for Women at the Center of Life. "We've all read The Silent Passage, Gail Sheehy's book about menopause, and most of us assumed we had this life stage figured out," Lynch says.
NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,SUN STAFF | June 3, 1996
Like many of his constituents, Baltimore County Del. Michael J. Finifter is a member of the "sandwich generation" -- with two young children and aging parents.He realizes he could get caught in the cross fire of providing care for all of them at the same time in coming years. And he knows that many other people face the same issue in Baltimore County, which has the largest population of elderly people in the state.With that in mind, Finifter is forming a task force to examine issues faced by middle-generation care givers and to develop ways to help.
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | February 25, 1996
I AM A MEMBER of the "sandwich generation," and my families -- the one I came from and the one I made, as Hillary Clinton would describe them -- have taken so many bites out of me during the last couple of weeks that there isn't enough of me left to feed the dog under the table.My husband left town on an extended business trip, my children have missed so much school because of poor weather and poor health that they no longer can read, and my sainted mother had the nerve to become gravely ill in a northern city during the worst winter in common memory.
NEWS
August 14, 2010
Sunday, Aug. 15 'Crazy for You' The Talent Machine Company closes out its summer season with the musical comedy "Crazy for You" at 2 p.m. in the Key Auditorium at St. John's College, 60 College Ave. in Annapolis. Tickets are $10. Information: 410-956-0512. Harvest Swap & Stream Ecology Share and swap tomatoes, herbs and other homegrown foods with other gardeners and explore Towser's Branch to find animals that live in the stream from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. at Hammond's Connection at the Dairy Farm, 100 Dairy Lane, Gambrills.
NEWS
By Don O'Briant and Don O'Briant,Cox News Service | April 6, 2003
They were the generation of women who broke down the barriers to traditionally male professions. They were told they could have it all and, in some cases, they did. Now these 40 million female baby boomers are hitting middle age, and many are facing confusion about everything from their relationships to their careers. "This definitely is not our mothers' midlife," says Amy Lynch, editor and publisher of the recently launched OurSelves: The Newsletter for Women at the Center of Life. "We've all read The Silent Passage, Gail Sheehy's book about menopause, and most of us assumed we had this life stage figured out," Lynch says.
BUSINESS
By Ellen James Martin and Ellen James Martin,SUN STAFF | December 11, 1995
Can a company do good deeds and still expect a profit? Yes, say the heads of four fledgling Baltimore-area firms.The four start-ups last week received grants totaling $50,000 from AT&T Capital Corp., which is co-sponsored by the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants.This year's Partners For Growth program provides seed money for a woodworking company that hires former juvenile offenders, a construction firm that renovates homes for the poor, a health care company that creates enriched adult day care programs, and a counseling and logistical service to help seniors navigate housing transitions.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Staff Writer | July 12, 1994
Rosemary Horstman placed her mother on the waiting list for Copper Ridge as soon as she learned about plans to build the facility for the memory-impaired."
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