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Sandusky

NEWS
June 23, 2014
Gerry Sandusky, the voice of the Ravens, shared his story and inspiration for his book "Forgotten Sundays" with more than 70 guests at the Abingdon library June 14. "Live a life of legacy not a life of luxury," Sandusky said, relaying just one of the many lessons he learned from the life his father led, Colts' coach John Sandusky. Sandusky spoke of his life growing up in the early years of the NFL and emphasized the importance of living your life, finding your legacy and embracing it. "Harford County Public Library was honored to have Gerry Sandusky speak at the Abingdon library.
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SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | November 8, 2011
Penn State, the State College community and the stunned sporting world outside of the Happy Valley bubble is reeling from the sex abuse allegations involving the school's former defensive coordinator, Jerry Sandusky. Meanwhile, some folks in College Park are understandably thinking, "That could have happened here. " In December 1991, the University of Maryland had interest in hiring Sandusky -- who coached the defense at Linebacker U when now-embattled head coach Joe Paterno won two national titles in the 1980s -- to become the Terps' head coach.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | July 23, 2000
Ever want to shoot hoops with Terps basketball coach Gary Williams? How 'bout lobbing a few with tennis champ Pam Shriver? Maybe shoot pool with the Ravens' Tony Banks, or the Orioles' Brady Anderson? The Mid-Summer Fest "SportsORama" was a chance to party and play various games with sports celebs and raise money for the Joe Sandusky Fund of the Baltimore Community Foundation and the CollegeBound Foundation. The partygoers browsed a bountiful buffet from Baltimore restaurants and danced to the music of O'Malley's March, starring none other than Charm City's hip (in black T-shirt)
BUSINESS
By LESTER A. PICKER | February 21, 1994
In this first of an occasional series, columnist Les Picker will follow the development of a newly formed Maryland foundation through its formative stages.It is a rare achievement, indeed, when we can create meaning and lasting benefit for others from a wrenching tragedy.Joe Sandusky was a promising athlete, on a football scholarship at the University of Tulsa. After a routine practice, the sophomore called home and spoke to his father and kid brother, making only passing mention of a minor infected shoulder, one of the constant scrapes and bruises that are part and parcel of the gridiron.
NEWS
March 29, 2013
It is horrifying to open a newspaper and see Jerry Sandusky again ("Sandusky: Paterno wouldn't allow pedophile," March 26). Just when you thought the Penn State sexual abuse scandal was over, Mr. Sandusky is giving interviews to a crazed documentary filmmaker, John Ziegler. To know that Mr. Ziegler is getting coverage for the nonsense he is pursuing - namely, that Joe Paterno did not know Mr. Sandusky was a pedophile - is just one more indignity to be endured by sexual abuse victims everywhere.
NEWS
November 17, 2011
It was sad to note that even though Jerry Sandusky's boss, Joe Paterno, had heard at least one report that his subordinate was sexually abusing young boys, he never told police. Apparently he hoped the problem would just disappear. Messrs. Sandusky and Paterno, along with the president of the university, were all fired when the story came out. But despite the actions taken by the school's board of trustees, there is no way that Mr. Sandusky's alleged sexual attacks on young boys should just disappear.
BUSINESS
By LESTER A. PICKER | April 17, 1995
Ever since it was a dream, I've been following the work of the Joe Sandusky Foundation, the brainchild of veteran Baltimore sportscaster Gerry Sandusky. I look in on it every so often to offer readers a chance to observe the growth of a work of passion and dedication.A couple of years ago, Gerry was driving to Pennsylvania when he had a vision. He was going to start a foundation, an opportunity to honor his much-loved older brother who died tragically while Gerry was still in high school.
SPORTS
By JOHN STEADMAN | March 24, 1995
It was a voice he couldn't identify. Maybe it was his conscience talking or a message, as he prefers to believe, from some higher power. Distinctly it told him: "Start the foundation." Twice more it repeated itself on that July afternoon two years ago during a trip along the interstate highway . . . Baltimore to Pittsburgh.That's what sent Gerry Sandusky into action. He listened to the zTC words as a believer and took them literally. With strong resolve, ,, he organized the Joe Sandusky Foundation, to honor the memory of a brother who died while a football player at Tulsa University.
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | April 2, 1995
"Nothing but good things can come of an effort like this," Miami Dolphins head coach Don Shula remarked, as he gave WBAL-TV sports anchor Gerry Sandusky a big hug. Shula was the honoree at the Joe Sandusky Foundation's recent first fund-raiser, held at the Marine Mammal Pavilion of the National Aquarium. The foundation was Gerry's creation, named in memory of his brother, Joe, a football player for the University of Tulsa who died at the age of 19. The foundation was established to raise money for Baltimore students to attend trade school or college.
SPORTS
Kevin Cowherd | June 19, 2013
Gerry Sandusky takes you to the third floor of his northern Baltimore County home and points to a book shelf. "There it is," he says. Huh? That's where he keeps his Ravens Super Bowl ring? Where's the glass display case with the spotlight shining on it? And the velvet ropes to keep the riff-raff at arm's length? And maybe a glowering security goon standing by so no one tries any funny business? I have made this trip to see what Sandusky, the long-time WBAL-TV sports director and Ravens broadcaster, plans to do with his Super Bowl ring.
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