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Sandtown Winchester

BUSINESS
By JAMIE SMITH HOPKINS and JAMIE SMITH HOPKINS,SUN REPORTER | June 27, 2006
In a swirling cloud of plaster dust, hard-hat-wearing teenagers armed with shovels, hammers and crowbars went to battle yesterday with the ruined ceiling of a ruined rowhouse on a block that's almost entirely boarded up. It's a familiar sight in West Baltimore's Sandtown-Winchester neighborhood, which has seen an unusual amount of investment from nonprofits that make rebuilding their mission. This is a war against crime and decay, fought with rehabbing tools - and like many wars it is long and difficult.
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NEWS
By JOE BURRIS and JOE BURRIS,SUN REPORTER | January 1, 2006
They've stuck around their neighborhood through the worst of times, when nearly a quarter of the rowhouses in Sandtown-Winchester were boarded shut and the sounds of police sirens and gunfire often drowned out the voices of playful children. So not much in the way of bad news deters residents of this close-knit, 72-square-block community in West Baltimore - even the news that in 2005 it had one of the highest murder totals in the city, tallying 11 homicides through Friday. That number includes one victim who died last year in a crime that occurred the year before - when Sandtown-Winchester had four homicides.
NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Sun Staff | July 10, 2005
On a block in Sandtown-Winchester cooled by a canopy of sycamores, Mary Day-Smith fills brick planters with pansies, marigolds, coleus, petunias, salvia and begonias. Mary, 10, has grown very attached to the flowers and vegetable plants that have transformed her West Baltimore neighborhood into a verdant oasis. "It's like our own children; that's how fun it is to plant flowers," says Mary, who is working with other kids under the guidance of neighbors Justine Bonner and Barbara Love. Soon, the kids will follow another elder, Rudolph Boston, around the corner to a large community garden plot where he will show them how to sow peanuts.
NEWS
June 5, 2004
Claybrook Francis Jackson, a baker who prepared sweets and pastries, died of a heart attack May 28 while walking on Laurens Street in West Baltimore. The Sandtown-Winchester resident was 61. Born in Baltimore and raised in Sandtown-Winchester, he attended Booker T. Washington Junior High School and Frederick Douglass High School. He served in the Army in Germany, then worked at Catonsville Bakery and Pariser's Bakery on Reisterstown Road, making doughnuts, cakes and buns. He attended Gillis Memorial Christian Community Church.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | October 9, 2003
The Rev. Douglas M. Stanton, a housing and public health advocate who worked to rebuild the Sandtown-Winchester neighborhood, died of cancer complications and pneumonia Oct. 2 at Northwest Hospital Center. The Owings Mills resident was 42. The Baltimore native grew up in the west-side neighborhood and was a 1978 graduate of Walbrook High School. He earned a social work degree from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, where he was a member of Tau Kappa Epsilon Fraternity and president of the Christian Council.
NEWS
August 14, 2003
Martin E. Jasmin, a Hecht Co. salesman and tailor, died of a stroke Friday at his home in Baltimore's Sandtown-Winchester neighborhood. He was 56. Mr. Jasmin, who was known as "Jazz," was born and raised in Sandtown-Winchester. He was a 1965 graduate of Carver Vocational-Technical High School, where he studied tailoring. During a career of more than 30 years, Mr. Jasmin worked in alterations at Steven Windsor Tall and Big Men's clothing store and Cushner's Men's Shops. He also worked in alterations at Hutzler's, Hochschild-Kohn and Macy's department stores.
NEWS
By Ariel Sabar and Ariel Sabar,SUN STAFF | June 30, 2003
Erica Fisher, a 28-year-old medical office assistant, is savoring leg room - and a new kind of independence - for the first time. She and her two children had been sharing a room in her mother's house. But Fisher bought her first home in the spring, moving with her young son and daughter into a gleaming new three-bedroom house in West Baltimore's Sandtown-Winchester neighborhood. Visitors toured Fisher's home yesterday during a ribbon-cutting celebration for 66 new houses in the neighborhood, which is grappling with drug corners, trash-strewn lots and poverty.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | March 30, 2003
Sandra Smith grew up in Sandtown-Winchester when things were nicer - when vacant lots weren't scattered everywhere, magnets for trash and crime. Yesterday, she and several dozen others attacked one of those pockets of blight and turned it into a beautiful spot, vowing to do the same throughout the gritty community they love. "We're taking back our neighborhood," said Smith, 52, as two of her young adopted sons raked beside her in the 1000 block of N. Carrollton Ave. "We'll get it done."
NEWS
By Reginald Fields and Reginald Fields,SUN STAFF | December 13, 2002
Baltimore's only long-term residential drug treatment program will be expanded next year as the city steps up efforts to combat a chronic cocaine and heroin problem, Mayor Martin O'Malley announced yesterday. "This is a great day for a lot of people who are learning to believe in themselves," said O'Malley, standing outside Bright Hope House Inc. in West Baltimore. "We badly need more residential treatment slots in Baltimore." The mayor announced that $1.5 million funded by the city, state and private donors would be used to expand Bright Hope House in Sandtown-Winchester from a 22-bedroom to a 32- bedroom facility.
NEWS
June 22, 2002
Leroy Montgomery Taylor, a retired technician who had worked in animal research at Edgewood Arsenal and was active in the restoration of Sandtown-Winchester, died of cancer Sunday at Mercy Medical Center. He was 80. The longtime Windsor Hills resident was born in the city and raised in the Sandtown-Winchester neighborhood. He was a 1939 graduate of Frederick Douglass High School and enlisted in the Army in 1942. He served with the Army's Medical Sanitation Corps in the Pacific until being discharged in 1946 with the rank of private.
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