Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSandra Bullock
IN THE NEWS

Sandra Bullock

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 16, 2006
My idea of a romantic gimmick is the one in Groundhog Day. Granted, that inspired piece of pop Buddhism was about a media striver reconfiguring his whole life by living the same 24 hours over and over again. But it also allowed him to fix every dunderheaded mistake he made in courting his true love - each awkward feint, every sorry piece of bravado, any misplaced emphasis and all the bone-headed declarations of his alpha-male worth. The modest gimmick behind the romance of The Lake House is a mailbox that functions as a time portal.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | December 28, 2013
Here's a greatly abridged list of facts that set Sean Tuohy Jr. apart from your average reserve on a mid-major college basketball team: Start with the Loyola guard's 23,379 Twitter followers. For a little perspective, the team's star, Dylon Cormier, has 643. Then there are the road crowds, which alternate between calling for Tuohy's entry to the game and booing him like he's J.J. Redick. All of this for a redshirt freshman who's played six minutes in his college career. Oh and three years ago, Tuohy watched Sandra Bullock - he calls her Sandy - win an Academy Award for portraying his mother, Leigh Anne.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 19, 2002
In 1924, two brilliant teen-agers, Nathan Leopold and Richard Loeb, planned and committed a murder as an intellectual game. Their case popularized the use of the phrase "thrill killers" and inspired several movies, most famously Compulsion (1959), starring Bradford Dillman, Dean Stockwell and Diane Varsi as a sympathetic girl. With Ryan Gosling, Michael Pitt and Agnes Bruckner in parallel roles, Murder By Numbers is a new-millennial California update. The killers here are high-school students, not college grads, but like Leopold and Loeb they want to pull a perfect crime to prove they're superior to society.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | October 19, 2013
The Senator Theatre is like your favorite old aunt — the busy, independent one who never married but who loved her nieces and nephews and spoiled them with candy and fantastic stories. She dressed like a Hollywood starlet, with rhinestone glasses and lots of lipstick. She always looked glamorous and classy — several notches above Hon. She was all that, and for the longest time. Then, you noticed things, troubling things — a ripped sleeve here, a stain there, a run of bad-hair days.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | December 28, 2013
Here's a greatly abridged list of facts that set Sean Tuohy Jr. apart from your average reserve on a mid-major college basketball team: Start with the Loyola guard's 23,379 Twitter followers. For a little perspective, the team's star, Dylon Cormier, has 643. Then there are the road crowds, which alternate between calling for Tuohy's entry to the game and booing him like he's J.J. Redick. All of this for a redshirt freshman who's played six minutes in his college career. Oh and three years ago, Tuohy watched Sandra Bullock - he calls her Sandy - win an Academy Award for portraying his mother, Leigh Anne.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | March 16, 2007
When you've got a tidy little thriller, it helps to have a tidy little ending. Or any ending at all. Premonition has no such thing. True, it ends - as in the celluloid stops going through the projector and the theater's house lights come up. But there's no resolution to the story. Heck, there's not even the confusion that a hurried ending would bring. There's just a sort of resignation, a feeling that this was a journey made for no purpose, a despondency born of filmmakers too caught up in their cool idea to realize that a story needs closure.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | October 16, 1998
"Practical Magic" sure could have used some.A hopeless mess that careens from here to there with all the finesse of a fish on dry land, "Practical Magic" wastes a good idea and two wonderful actresses (Sandra Bullock and Nicole Kidman) on a film that has no idea where it's going. It's "The Exorcist" combined with "Mary Poppins," with a little "Thelma & Louise" thrown in just for the heck of it.Bullock and Kidman are Sally and Gillian Owens, sisters and witches growing up under an unfortunate curse: Thanks to mob hysteria back in Old Salem, all Owens women are fated to watch the men they love die.Over the years, the Owens gals have come up with several ways of dealing with their fate.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN FILM CRITIC | December 22, 2000
Poor Gracie Hart. She's spent her life trying to be one of the boys, learning to swear, drink and fight like the brother you wish you'd had around for protection. Now, as an FBI agent, she gets to put all that training to good use. And the undercover assignment the bureau figures she's perfect for? Beauty pageant contestant. Sandra Bullock gets to try her hand at slapstick in "Miss Congeniality," a lightweight and generally amusing farce that skewers the world of both beauty shows and those who ridicule them.
FEATURES
By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,SUN STAFF | March 19, 1999
The forecast for "Forces of Nature" is pleasantly bumpy.Like the crazy weather it uses as a metaphor, this film -- part road movie and part romantic comedy -- is happily full of the unexpected.Ben (Ben Affleck) and Sarah (Sandra Bullock) are the characters suffering through various disasters on planes, trains and automobiles on their way from New York to Savannah, Ga. After their plane wrecks on the runway as they try to take off, they end up stuck in a rental car with a guy named Vic, headed South.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | April 14, 2000
Give Sandra Bullock credit for knowing her limitations. Having steadily built up her star clout since appearing in "Speed" about a thousand years ago, she easily could have gone the "Girl, Interrupted" route, adapting some searing first-person memoir to explore her inner demons and (God forbid) "stretch" herself as an actress. In "28 Days" she gets to explore inner demons, but not enough to cast a pall over her famously perky persona. She may be a recovering alcoholic and pill addict, but here rehab is more the comic milieu of some lovable, wacky characters than metaphor for human suffering in a world gone mad. Bullock's character goes through some changes, but she never turns into some unrecognizably serious actress.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | August 28, 2009
From reviving an exuberant 1980s film and TV franchise about singing and dancing high-school students with "Fame," to bringing an all-time children's classic to the screen with Maurice Sendak's "Where the Wild Things Are," nervous Hollywood studio executives are trying a little bit of everything in an effort to weather, and maybe rise a little bit above, these uncertain economic times. Among the heavy guns being called into service: new movies from directors Joel and Ethan Coen ("A Serious Man")
FEATURES
July 24, 2009
Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince . 1/2 ( 3 1/2 STARS) $77.8 million $ 158 million 1.5 week Rated: PG Running time: 153 minutes What it's about: Harry Potter (Daniel Radcliffe, above) must persuade an eccentric potions professor to reveal one source of Voldemort's power. Our take: As Harry enters the thick of adolescence, the filmmakers reward him with a movie that bubbles and pops with humor and feeling. Ice Age: Dawn of the Dinosaurs . ( 2 STARS)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | June 19, 2009
The Proposal should have been called The Formula . The Recipe would suggest too much flavor. It's been made according to the chapter in the box-office manual labeled "summer counter-programming." Take one established female star (Sandra Bullock) hungry enough for a hit to sign on to substandard material. Add a male up-and-comer (Ryan Reynolds) who still has to prove that he's a leading man. Proceed to wrap them inside a romantic comedy with several high-concept twists. Hot-weather audiences flocked to The Devil Wears Prada a few years ago. So transform Anne Hathaway's executive assistant into a man (Reynolds)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | March 16, 2007
When you've got a tidy little thriller, it helps to have a tidy little ending. Or any ending at all. Premonition has no such thing. True, it ends - as in the celluloid stops going through the projector and the theater's house lights come up. But there's no resolution to the story. Heck, there's not even the confusion that a hurried ending would bring. There's just a sort of resignation, a feeling that this was a journey made for no purpose, a despondency born of filmmakers too caught up in their cool idea to realize that a story needs closure.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 16, 2006
My idea of a romantic gimmick is the one in Groundhog Day. Granted, that inspired piece of pop Buddhism was about a media striver reconfiguring his whole life by living the same 24 hours over and over again. But it also allowed him to fix every dunderheaded mistake he made in courting his true love - each awkward feint, every sorry piece of bravado, any misplaced emphasis and all the bone-headed declarations of his alpha-male worth. The modest gimmick behind the romance of The Lake House is a mailbox that functions as a time portal.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | June 19, 2009
The Proposal should have been called The Formula . The Recipe would suggest too much flavor. It's been made according to the chapter in the box-office manual labeled "summer counter-programming." Take one established female star (Sandra Bullock) hungry enough for a hit to sign on to substandard material. Add a male up-and-comer (Ryan Reynolds) who still has to prove that he's a leading man. Proceed to wrap them inside a romantic comedy with several high-concept twists. Hot-weather audiences flocked to The Devil Wears Prada a few years ago. So transform Anne Hathaway's executive assistant into a man (Reynolds)
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | October 9, 1993
Say hello to Hollywood's vision of a horrible, un-livable future:All guns are in a museum. Cars drive themselves. People have no-contact sex. No one's been murdered for more than a decade. Cops arrest people for using profanity.How could you possibly make this into a pyrotechnic action film?Rambo to the rescue!Oops. Actually, Sylvester Stallone is named John Spartan in his latest film. But the formula seems familiar: iconoclast hero, deranged villain, lots of gunplay, things going boom and acres and acres of well-defined musculature.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.