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By New York Times News Service | September 18, 1990
MANAGUA, Nicaragua -- More than six months after the Sandinista Front lost power in national elections, the official government register has published a new law, dated before the elections, that grants Sandinista commanders broad permanent authority over the structure and operations of Nicaragua's large military forces.The law, apparently approved by Sandinista leaders while the National Assembly was in recess in December, took immediate effect upon its publication this month in La Gaceta, the little-noticed newspaper of official legal announcements.
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By Hector Tobar and Hector Tobar,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 7, 2006
MANAGUA, Nicaragua -- Daniel Ortega, the rebel leader driven from power 16 years ago by a U.S.-backed war and the missteps of his own Sandinista movement, was cruising toward victory and an unlikely political resurrection in Nicaragua's presidential vote yesterday. The result was a blow to the Bush administration, which worked actively to discourage Nicaraguans from voting for Ortega, a 60-year-old former Marxist now allied with Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez, the bete noire of Latin American and U.S. conservatives.
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NEWS
By Tim Johnson and Tim Johnson,Knight-Ridder News Service | September 6, 1992
MANAGUA, Nicaragua -- Acting amid growing U.S. pressure, the Nicaraguan government removed 12 top officers from the Sandinista-run police force yesterday but came under immediate FTC fire for its choice for new national police chief.An outspoken Roman Catholic bishop once sent into exile by incoming Police Chief Fernando Caldera called him a "dogmatic" Sandinista with a "totalitarian ideology."President Violeta Chamorro said the police shake-up was part of a drive to make the 6,600-member force less partisan and more professional.
NEWS
By Edward Hegstrom and Edward Hegstrom,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 8, 1998
PALOMAR, Nicaragua -- The newspapers say the Nicaraguan civil war ended eight years ago, but Comandante Modesto Olivar swears it isn't true.A Sandinista combat fighter who joined the movement 20 years ago at age 16, Olivar never adjusted to civilian life after the Sandinista leaders and the U.S.-backed contras reached a peace agreement in 1990.So, the comandante recently dragged out his old AK-47 assault rifle and retreated into this remote, malaria-ridden tropical forest, where he has joined 200 ex-Sandinista fighters who refuse to give up the war.The rebels, known as the Andres Castro United Front, control this vast, roadless wilderness along the Wani River.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | July 28, 1993
MANAGUA, Nicaragua -- Operating from this Sandinista sanctuary, the international kidnappers stalked their victims, documented their habits and calculated multimillion-dollar ransoms.They followed one prominent Mexican businessman to a church Mass for his dead wife; they staked out the homes of others from nearby bus stops and parks. They knew the bank account numbers, quarterly earnings and favorite colors of Latin America's richest men and women."Ignacio Aranguren -- he has a lot of money," the kidnappers observed of the Mexican food magnate.
NEWS
January 17, 1992
MANAGUA, Nicaragua -- The government of President Violeta Chamorro spurred negotiations with armed bands yesterday in an effort to pacify Nicaragua on the eve of a visit by U.S. Secretary of State James A. Baker III.A peaceful Nicaragua is a must for continued U.S. aid. Mr. Baker, who arrives for a five-hour visit today, stressed the need for peace last November after rioting by Sandinista Front militants caused millions of dollars of damage to public property.Interior...
NEWS
February 24, 1991
Nicaragua has little to show for a year of democratically elected government dedicated to reconciliation. Few Nicaraguans are reconciled.Inflation is running at 12,000 percent and unemployment at 40 percent. The government of Violetta Chamorro is split between moderates, who approve her concessions to the ousted Sandinistas, and hard-line ex-contras who want faster land redistribution to former contra soldiers.The Sandinista-controlled unions are on a new round of strikes, anticipating austerities that the International Monetary Fund wants Mrs. Chamorro to impose.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | April 20, 1992
MANAGUA, Nicaragua -- Scores of poor and ailing pilgrims are arriving at a shack in Managua where a man with a scruffy beard and army boots has taken the name Jesus and says he can heal the sick and make blind people see.The man, Marcos Antonio Bonilla, entered a bustling Managua market a few weeks before Easter and announced he is the son of God.Since then, newspapers and radio stations linked to the leftist Sandinista Front have given Mr. Bonilla extensive...
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | June 9, 1991
MANAGUA, Nicaragua -- Sandinista troops recently seized and executed a former contra commander, shooting him in the back and mutilating his body. Hours later, ex-contras kidnapped, knifed and shot a former Sandinista lieutenant, dumping his body on a nearby ranch.Has nothing changed in Nicaragua?Well, a few things. As contra veterans inaugurated a new computer-equipped political headquarters in Managua, President Violeta Chamorro lauded them for their main recent contribution to postwar life: boosting black bean production.
NEWS
October 17, 1996
NICARAGUA'S fragile democracy is losing its political center as President Violeta Chamorro's six-year term draws to an end. In Sunday's elections, the only two viable candidates are former Sandinista leader Daniel Ortega on the far left and former Contra sympathizer Arnoldo Aleman on the far right. Only in the event of a runoff would these bitter rivals be tempted to appeal to Mrs. Chamorro's dwindling number of allies.While it is fashionable within the elite that always runs Nicaragua to denigrate Mrs. Chamorro as a weak and feckless president, these complaints come mainly from those on the political extremes she refused to placate.
NEWS
By Mark Fazollah | November 17, 1996
MANAGUA, Nicaragua - In a tragic form of postwar unity, former Sandinista soldiers and contra rebels hobble together through the hallways at Managua's Rehabilitation Hospital to have their prostheses refitted.Some have wooden legs that have cracked. Some have artificial limbs whose internal bushings have worn out. Some amputees have simply lost weight and their prostheses no longer fit them."No one fights here," said Eddy Garcia, who directs the state hospital's prosthesis manufacturing center.
NEWS
October 24, 1996
ONCE AGAIN the Nicaraguan people have repudiated the leftist Sandinista movement that plunged their country into war, economic collapse and confrontation with the United States during the 1980s. They first did so six years ago when a landslide vote brought moderate, reconciliatory Violeta Chamorro to the presidency. This time, by a narrower margin, they have elected rightist Arnaldo Aleman, head of the (conservative) Liberal Alliance, to lead an increasingly polarized nation.Until Sandinista leader Daniel Ortega accepts the election verdict, which so far he has refused to do, Nicaragua is faced with the threat of protests and renewed violence.
NEWS
By David Pezzullo | October 20, 1996
WHAT A difference a few years make. Daniel Ortega, dressed in fatigues, came to power in Nicaragua in 1979 when a popular revolt led by the Sandinista revolutionary movement unseated the dictator Anastasio Somoza. One of the least dangerous of the Sandinista commanders, Ortega quickly became the compromise political leader of the triumphant revolution. But within less than two years, the Sandinistas chose a rocky road, mixing Somoza's feudalism with Castro's Soviet slant. In short -- order, the revolution lost much of its pluralistic promise, the Sandinista leadership lost the support of most Nicaraguans and the Reagan administration rushed into the fray, financing the anti-Sandinista contras.
NEWS
By Jonathan Power | October 18, 1996
LONDON -- Can one imagine when (and if) Daniel Ortega Saavedra and his ex-revolutionary Sandinistas are swept back into office after Sunday's general election Ronald Reagan saying calmly, ''Here we go again. So what?''It was Mr. Reagan, after all, who said of the Sandinista regime, ''If we ignore the malignancy in Nicaragua it will spread and become a mortal threat to the entire New World.'' The Sandinistas were ''just two days drive from Harlingen, Texas.'' And, as Secretary of Defense Caspar Weinberger said, ''Defending the mainland ranks above all other priorities.
NEWS
October 17, 1996
NICARAGUA'S fragile democracy is losing its political center as President Violeta Chamorro's six-year term draws to an end. In Sunday's elections, the only two viable candidates are former Sandinista leader Daniel Ortega on the far left and former Contra sympathizer Arnoldo Aleman on the far right. Only in the event of a runoff would these bitter rivals be tempted to appeal to Mrs. Chamorro's dwindling number of allies.While it is fashionable within the elite that always runs Nicaragua to denigrate Mrs. Chamorro as a weak and feckless president, these complaints come mainly from those on the political extremes she refused to placate.
NEWS
By FORT LAUDERDALE SUN-SENTINEL | July 7, 1996
JINOTEGA, Nicaragua -- When Mervin Gonzalez returned to this remote mountain area from South Florida exile, he didn't expect masked kidnappers. Or a gun in his mouth. Or two men shot to death during a rescue attempt.Unlike hundreds of others who have died in Nicaragua's smoldering "silent war," Gonzalez survived to describe the 1995 adventure."When I came back to Nicaragua, I didn't expect to carry a gun," said Gonzalez, 33, a coffee farmer who once worked at one of Miami's best-known restaurants.
NEWS
By David Pezzullo | October 20, 1996
WHAT A difference a few years make. Daniel Ortega, dressed in fatigues, came to power in Nicaragua in 1979 when a popular revolt led by the Sandinista revolutionary movement unseated the dictator Anastasio Somoza. One of the least dangerous of the Sandinista commanders, Ortega quickly became the compromise political leader of the triumphant revolution. But within less than two years, the Sandinistas chose a rocky road, mixing Somoza's feudalism with Castro's Soviet slant. In short -- order, the revolution lost much of its pluralistic promise, the Sandinista leadership lost the support of most Nicaraguans and the Reagan administration rushed into the fray, financing the anti-Sandinista contras.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 22, 1991
DOES ANYONE remember Nicaragua? Where U.S.-backe rebels that former President Reagan likened to our Founding Fathers were fighting communism? "Our side" won, but the average Nicaraguan is no better off, and U.S. indifference is partly to blame.That is what prompted President Violeta Barrios de Chamorro to come to the U.S. [last] week on her first visit since being elected in 1990 -- to remind President Bush and Congress that her country is still desperate for U.S. aid. But does anyone remember Mrs. Chamorro?
NEWS
By Ginger Thompson and Ginger Thompson,Staff Writer | August 25, 1993
ESTELI, Nicaragua -- In an abandoned school house outside this northern mountain town, a thin 30-year-old man sits with an automatic assault rifle in his lap and tries to explain the violence that continues to grip this country, once one of the the Western Hemisphere's principal ideological battlegrounds.He goes by the common name of Jesus. The dual kidnappings that have hit Nicaragua since Thursday when former contras seized 38 government officials and Sandinista politicians, and leftist gunmen retaliated by kidnapping Vice President Virgilio Godoy and several other conservative politicians, wouldn't have surprised him.Jesus spent most of his adulthood with a gun slung over his shoulder as a fighter for the leftist Sandinista army during its bloody war against the U.S.-financed contra guerrilla force.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | July 28, 1993
MANAGUA, Nicaragua -- Operating from this Sandinista sanctuary, the international kidnappers stalked their victims, documented their habits and calculated multimillion-dollar ransoms.They followed one prominent Mexican businessman to a church Mass for his dead wife; they staked out the homes of others from nearby bus stops and parks. They knew the bank account numbers, quarterly earnings and favorite colors of Latin America's richest men and women."Ignacio Aranguren -- he has a lot of money," the kidnappers observed of the Mexican food magnate.
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