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By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2011
It was around dinnertime September 2003 when Hurricane Isabel wreaked havoc on the Chesapeake Bay, causing some of the worst flooding in 70 years. Waters reached up to eight feet above normal tides. Thousands had to be evacuated. Property damage reached over $400 million inMaryland alone. In its aftermath,Fells Point was devastated. "I was up fortysome hours going around the neighborhood helping people move stuff," said Ron Furman, owner of Max's Taphouse. "It was wild. A lot of work.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Beth Aaltonen and For The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2014
Back from Tribal Council, Tony is feeling secure, so he's spouting off about people being “worthy” and being “allowed” to stay there. He keeps asking Spencer why it's a compliment that everybody voted for him, and why he's being targeted. Because you're constantly strategizing, you've set yourself up as a leader and you're more than a little bit crazy. Trish and LJ agree with me, because they're talking about whether or not Tony is going to go off the deep end. And sure enough, he can't stop talking about the fact that people are voting for him. He's a self-fulfilling prophecy: he's going to be so paranoid and obsessive that he's going to alienate people in his alliance, and they're going to vote him off, which is what he was paranoid about in the first place.
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SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,Staff Writer | July 15, 1993
The stage was set for the Bowie Baysox last night.In town for an encore was The Famous Chicken to do his act at Memorial Stadium, and Brien Taylor, the No. 1 pick in the 1991 summer draft, was pitching for the Albany-Colonie Yankees.The Baysox had enjoyed their biggest advance ticket sale of the season -- more than 8,000 -- with a crowd of more than 10,000 expected.Then, the entire show was blown away in about two minutes.A severe thunderstorm struck at about 5:30 p.m. and head groundskeeper Jimmy Juergens and members of the front office hastily applied the new lightweight tarpaulin the team purchased two weeks ago."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2011
  Some Baltimore are residents and business owners are feeling like they were sandbagged -- by the media, by the government agencies. That feeling, of having been needlessly duped into both provision-making and plan-canceling, was the talk of the social media on the morning after Irene's march through Delmarva. Not all of the talk was sour grapes, of course. Many updates and tweets expressed relief that the area had survived Irene mostly unscathed. And not everyone was so lucky -- power outages, flooded basements and fallen trees at best were disruptions, at worst hardships.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Andrea Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2011
First, an earthquake rattled Carol Boehlein in her Southeast Baltimore rowhouse. Now Hurricane Irene is threatening to blow her windows in. That's why Boehlein and her husband, Bernard, were at a Home Depot in Southeast Baltimore on Friday afternoon with their handyman, buying plywood. They planned to nail the boards to the windows of the house they've lived in for 40 years. "After what happened with the earthquake," Boehlein said, "I don't take nothing for granted. " Across the Baltimore region, people were preparing for the hurricane, the brunt of which is expected to lash Maryland Saturday night and Sunday morning.
NEWS
By Phil Garlington and Phil Garlington,Orange County Register | April 28, 1999
HESPERIA, Calif. -- It's not exactly that the aborigines of Australia's Western Desert have forgotten how to build traditional earth houses. It's just that it's been a while, and besides, they've heard about some new architectural ideas for using nature-friendly building materials.Sandbags, for instance.A half-dozen village leaders from the Ngurawanna community, in the Pilbara region of the great Outback, were on a walkabout of sorts this month at a seminar put on at Iranian-born architect Nader Khalili's Cal-Earth Institute.
NEWS
September 25, 2008
485 million oysters planted in bay in '08 3 More than 485 million oysters were planted in the Chesapeake Bay in 2008, setting a one-year record for the state's oyster restoration effort, Gov. Martin O'Malley announced yesterday. "The irreplaceable value and role of oysters in our bay gives rise to the need for escalating restoration efforts," O'Malley, a Democrat, said in a statement. Since 2000, more than 1.4 billion oysters have been planted in 1,100 acres of oyster reefs that had lost productivity, officials said.
NEWS
By JILL ROSEN and JILL ROSEN,SUN REPORTER | June 28, 2006
While the latest angry storm to thrash across Maryland revealed a few more of its dirty tricks last night, property owners in the state's low-lying areas tried to keep their spirits high. Even as people across the state watched weather reports and hoped that this wouldn't be another Isabel or Ivan, in a matter of seconds the storm showed it had just that kind of furious potential. Water burst from a rushing creek, quickly trapping a Mount Airy woman inside her home with her granddaughter.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Beth Aaltonen and For The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2014
Back from Tribal Council, Tony is feeling secure, so he's spouting off about people being “worthy” and being “allowed” to stay there. He keeps asking Spencer why it's a compliment that everybody voted for him, and why he's being targeted. Because you're constantly strategizing, you've set yourself up as a leader and you're more than a little bit crazy. Trish and LJ agree with me, because they're talking about whether or not Tony is going to go off the deep end. And sure enough, he can't stop talking about the fact that people are voting for him. He's a self-fulfilling prophecy: he's going to be so paranoid and obsessive that he's going to alienate people in his alliance, and they're going to vote him off, which is what he was paranoid about in the first place.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2011
Seddef Everest had been looking forward to touring Baltimore this weekend with her boyfriend, Dan McDole, who was visiting from Queens. But Hurricane Irene struck, shutting down the water taxi and making other destinations seem uninviting to the fourth-year medical student, who is doing a rotation at St. Agnes Hospital. "It kind of put a damper on things," said Everest, while she and McDole watched the weather through the doorway of The Point, a restaurant and bar on Thames Street.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2011
Seddef Everest had been looking forward to touring Baltimore this weekend with her boyfriend, Dan McDole, who was visiting from Queens. But Hurricane Irene struck, shutting down the water taxi and making other destinations seem uninviting to the fourth-year medical student, who is doing a rotation at St. Agnes Hospital. "It kind of put a damper on things," said Everest, while she and McDole watched the weather through the doorway of The Point, a restaurant and bar on Thames Street.
TRAVEL
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2011
Slightly weaker, but still a big, wet and dangerous storm, Hurricane Irene hit the North Carolina beaches early Saturday en route to a battened-down Delmarva Peninsula. The state of Maryland, Anne Arundel County, and the cities of Baltimore, Annapolis and Ocean City declared states of emergency. A mandatory evacuation was under way in Ocean City , and local authorities urged residents in other flood-prone neighborhoods to clear out before the storm strikes. "This storm has made landfall," Gov. Martin O'Malley said at midafternoon Friday.
TRAVEL
By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2011
It was around dinnertime September 2003 when Hurricane Isabel wreaked havoc on the Chesapeake Bay, causing some of the worst flooding in 70 years. Waters reached up to eight feet above normal tides. Thousands had to be evacuated. Property damage reached over $400 million inMaryland alone. In its aftermath,Fells Point was devastated. "I was up fortysome hours going around the neighborhood helping people move stuff," said Ron Furman, owner of Max's Taphouse. "It was wild. A lot of work.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2011
As Hurricane Irene moves closer to Maryland, Annapolis MayorJoshua J. Cohen declared a State of Emergency within the city limits, effective 10 a.m. Friday, urging residents in low-lying areas to evacuate by Saturday afternoon. Worcester County also ordered a mandatory evacuation by 9 a.m. Saturday in the following areas: West Ocean City Sanitary Service Area (east of Herring Creek and north of Old Bridge Road); all properties east of Route 611 (Stephen Decatur Highway); and all properties in South Point (both sides of South Point Road)
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Andrea Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2011
First, an earthquake rattled Carol Boehlein in her Southeast Baltimore rowhouse. Now Hurricane Irene is threatening to blow her windows in. That's why Boehlein and her husband, Bernard, were at a Home Depot in Southeast Baltimore on Friday afternoon with their handyman, buying plywood. They planned to nail the boards to the windows of the house they've lived in for 40 years. "After what happened with the earthquake," Boehlein said, "I don't take nothing for granted. " Across the Baltimore region, people were preparing for the hurricane, the brunt of which is expected to lash Maryland Saturday night and Sunday morning.
NEWS
September 25, 2008
485 million oysters planted in bay in '08 3 More than 485 million oysters were planted in the Chesapeake Bay in 2008, setting a one-year record for the state's oyster restoration effort, Gov. Martin O'Malley announced yesterday. "The irreplaceable value and role of oysters in our bay gives rise to the need for escalating restoration efforts," O'Malley, a Democrat, said in a statement. Since 2000, more than 1.4 billion oysters have been planted in 1,100 acres of oyster reefs that had lost productivity, officials said.
NEWS
By Scott Higham and Scott Higham,SUN STAFF | September 17, 1999
Timmy Hicks barely made it out alive in Southern Maryland. Bandits stole sandbags from storefronts in Annapolis. Hundreds of rats were flushed from their flooded holes in South Baltimore. A small school of carp flopped around an Easton golf course. And when a Coast Guard cutter limped into the Inner Harbor after dodging Hurricane Floyd at sea yesterday, members of the crew had a key question as the busiest month of the Atlantic storm season draws to a close and the baseball pennant races begin in earnest: "Did the Mets win?"
NEWS
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 13, 1997
FARGO, N.D. -- When the moment they feared most came and the Red River finally reached its crest yesterday, the town of Fargo was still standing. But people here didn't stop to celebrate. As usual, they worked.But in between manning water pumps and shoring up dikes, they allowed themselves a newfound luxury: hope. After months of punishing blizzards, ice storms and now floods, this stoic community began to warily believe that its endurance test against the elements may soon be won."I compare it to a pregnancy without the good outcome," says Yvonne Gunderson, 34, a homemaker who has volunteered with the flood effort.
NEWS
By JILL ROSEN and JILL ROSEN,SUN REPORTER | June 28, 2006
While the latest angry storm to thrash across Maryland revealed a few more of its dirty tricks last night, property owners in the state's low-lying areas tried to keep their spirits high. Even as people across the state watched weather reports and hoped that this wouldn't be another Isabel or Ivan, in a matter of seconds the storm showed it had just that kind of furious potential. Water burst from a rushing creek, quickly trapping a Mount Airy woman inside her home with her granddaughter.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 27, 2004
FORT POLK, La. - When soldiers of the Army's 1st Infantry Division rolled into Iraq several weeks ago, they lacked enough armored Humvees for everyone. So, like the soldiers in other units, some of them had to stack sandbags behind the Humvees' front seats - an all-but-useless way to fend off the bullets and roadside bombs that have killed scores of U.S. troops. One year after U.S. troops invaded Iraq, soldiers are coursing through dusty country roads and teeming city streets without adequate armor protection.
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