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By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2010
The drug war is fought on the streets with undercover buys and corner sweeps that make the news. It's also fought with secret wiretaps and long hours of surveillance to target some of the bigger gangs in Baltimore. The drug war is also fought at airports and through the mail with monitoring devices hidden in the bottoms of brown slip-on sandals. This case begins in Chanmagua Esquipalas, Guatemala, travels through Miami and ends on O'Donnell Street in Southeast Baltimore. In one way, it demonstrates the various ways smugglers try to get cocaine into Baltimore — not all narcotics are hidden in cars driven up to New York on Interstate 95. It also shows the lengths law enforcement goes to track down shipments of drugs.
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FEATURES
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2014
Soul Triple Skull Tank The SoulCycle revolution is here. The fitness movement popular in Los Angeles and New York has spawned a clothing line that can be purchased exclusively on shopbop.com. This black tank top with gold metallic lettering is flashy, fashionable and functional. Find this Soul Triple Skull Tank, $64, from the Malibu collection from SoulCycle exclusively on shopbop.com. Jack Rogers sandals Match a classic look with some dazzling bling with these Jack Rogers sandals sold at Collections.
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FEATURES
By JOHN WOESTENDIEK and JOHN WOESTENDIEK,SUN REPORTER | August 7, 2006
Kathleen Farrell has left a mark - thousands of them, in fact - on beaches she has never set foot on. Farrell, who lives in St. Petersburg, Fla., wasn't at the beach, but vacationing in the mountains of North Carolina in 1996 when inspiration struck: a newfangled way to spread not just "The Word," but three of them. Farrell, a clinical psychologist, sliced up an old inner tube, cut the pieces into letters, glued them backward on the soles of an old pair of sandals and then walked from wet grass onto wooden deck, leaving a trail of words behind her. The word "Jesus" was left by the right foot; the words "Loves You" by the left.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2010
The drug war is fought on the streets with undercover buys and corner sweeps that make the news. It's also fought with secret wiretaps and long hours of surveillance to target some of the bigger gangs in Baltimore. The drug war is also fought at airports and through the mail with monitoring devices hidden in the bottoms of brown slip-on sandals. This case begins in Chanmagua Esquipalas, Guatemala, travels through Miami and ends on O'Donnell Street in Southeast Baltimore. In one way, it demonstrates the various ways smugglers try to get cocaine into Baltimore — not all narcotics are hidden in cars driven up to New York on Interstate 95. It also shows the lengths law enforcement goes to track down shipments of drugs.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Staff | June 13, 2004
Never have American women spent so much money on so little leather. This is the summer of the sandal, and the sweeter the color, the more feminine the shape, the thinner the strap and the daintier the heel the better. "Women are happy to get out of their heels," sums up In Style magazine's fashion editor, Toby Tucker. She's right -- you can almost hear the collective sigh of relief as pumps are pushed to the back of the closet and pantyhose are peeled off. Sandals have always been a hot-weather phenomenon, at least for casual looks.
FEATURES
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | August 29, 2005
A laid-back surfer dude who shunned shoes, Sean Berg wanted to find a way to keep his toes warm in the winter. He was living on the Outer Banks of North Carolina, recently out of college, and running a newspaper-delivery company when not spending his time in the water. This was 1995, and Berg was a flip-flop devotee before they became trendy, before Northwestern University's women's lacrosse team wore them to the White House, before designers bejeweled them to sell at Neiman Marcus for $395.
FEATURES
By Elsa Klensch and Elsa Klensch,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | February 6, 1997
Is there a dress as comfortable as jeans? I'm a medical intern and as I often work the emergency room I always wear white jeans.Now I've been asked by the chief physician to appear before the hospital board of directors and do a presentation about my experience in the intern program.When he told me I'd been selected, he jokingly said something about my needing to wear a dress. I'm not enchanted with the idea, but I guess I have to take the hint.I know I will be nervous, so I want a dress that's cool, comfortable and attractive.
FEATURES
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2014
Soul Triple Skull Tank The SoulCycle revolution is here. The fitness movement popular in Los Angeles and New York has spawned a clothing line that can be purchased exclusively on shopbop.com. This black tank top with gold metallic lettering is flashy, fashionable and functional. Find this Soul Triple Skull Tank, $64, from the Malibu collection from SoulCycle exclusively on shopbop.com. Jack Rogers sandals Match a classic look with some dazzling bling with these Jack Rogers sandals sold at Collections.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,Sun Staff | July 16, 2000
Manish Singh is a study in contradictions. The designer's delicately hand-beaded evening dresses and separates look like the creations of an experienced, senior designer. Manish (pronounced Mneesh) is 27, self-taught and has been designing women's clothing only since 1996. The designer (right), who prefers to be known by only his first name, is Indian. He named his company, Victor Rossi, after an Italian. "I don't think the world is ready for Manish," he explains. "Naming the company after an Italian makes it nondenominational."
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | August 24, 2003
SALT LAKE CITY - Sometimes, just sometimes, there's a profound moment in your life, when your significant other leans over and says the inspirational words that act like a spark to kindling. Matt Paxton had that moment in January, as he slid into his Jeep to run errands. His girlfriend looked deep into his eyes and said: "Your sandals stink. Get out." Those five words transformed the 28-year-old man from an unemployed financial analyst into a pitchman in an out-of-the-way corner of the Outdoor Retailer trade show, the largest gathering of gear makers and service providers in the country.
FEATURES
By Sloane Brown, Special to The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2010
Tiffani Currin loves fashion but has to watch how much she expresses herself in one job, that as an M&T bank teller. But the day we "glimpsed" the 25-year-old Northwest Baltimore resident, she was on her lunch break from her second job as a nail technician at Spa Sante in Harbor East. That meant a much more expressive look in her "chic, fitted" style. Currin wore a pastel floral cotton blazer from Forever 21 over a ribbed cotton tank from Nordstrom. Her dark-wash bootcut jeans came from Ann Taylor Loft, and her bronze metallic wedge Rouge sandals were Macy's finds.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2010
Fourteen years after Mother Teresa's last visit to Baltimore, her blood, her hair and several of her personal effects returned to the city Wednesday. The items, which also include a rosary and sandals worn by the candidate for Catholic sainthood, were displayed for several hours at the hospice for AIDS patients she opened in East Baltimore in 1992. In the chapel at the Gift of Hope hospice on Ashland Avenue, operated by Mother Teresa's Missionaries of Charity, Shirley Sapp paused before the frayed shoes.
NEWS
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2009
What do you get when you combine the Walters Art Museum's new exhibition, "Heroes: Mortals and Myths in Ancient Greece," and the Baltimore-Piraeus Sister City Committee fundraiser on the night before Halloween? You get one heckuva Greek party. Guests were greeted by event co-chairs Vasi Karas and Georgia Vavas, as well as the Greek goddess Athena, aka event committee member Gayle Economos - adorned in a golden toga and face makeup. "This is a place where Greeks feel at home," event honorary chairman Aris Melissaratos said as he nodded toward guests, including: Niki Marsh, Pinewood Elementary School speech and language pathologist; Kali Maheridis, DLA Piper controller; John Diokoulos, Acropolis Construction president; and Darlene Diokoulos, community volunteer.
NEWS
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2009
Maggie Ferrante looks crisp and cool on a warm day at the Towson Farmers' Market. But, the 21-year-old Towson resident is quick to explain that this isn't her usual "casual and slightly funky" style. "First of all, I don't normally dress like the first lady ... I have jury duty today." However, the recent Tulane University grad is finding her style in a bit of transition. "I'm actually coming out of [doing mostly] thrift store shopping. I'm liking a cleaner, fresher look." That ought to suit her well as she heads down to Atlanta soon to start a job as a healthcare consultant.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2009
Not all the sights at Cirque du Soleil's "Kooza" were onstage. Just check out 20-year-old Allie Bulmer, who was in the opening-night audience. The Montgomery College student and waitress loves watching current trends and adapting them to her "sophisticated, sexy and a little bohemian" style. But, this Damascus resident is no fashion fascist. "Everyone has their own style. The fashion police may say don't do that, but let people do [what they want]. If it's last season and you like it, that's fine.
NEWS
By TANIKA WHITE and TANIKA WHITE,Sun Reporter | October 14, 2007
There was a time (well before I was born) when wearing slacks and a button-up shirt to the office was the domain of professional men. But, as women have taken over the work force, we've taken over that casual office-wear, too. And, as women will do, we've put our own feminine spin on it. Take a look at the way Shikuh Ruinge adds color and embroidery to her button-up and jazzes the pinstripes with pops of yellow and orange. Add to all that her flirty sandals, and the result is workplace "Wow!"
NEWS
By TANIKA WHITE and TANIKA WHITE,Sun Reporter | October 14, 2007
There was a time (well before I was born) when wearing slacks and a button-up shirt to the office was the domain of professional men. But, as women have taken over the work force, we've taken over that casual office-wear, too. And, as women will do, we've put our own feminine spin on it. Take a look at the way Shikuh Ruinge adds color and embroidery to her button-up and jazzes the pinstripes with pops of yellow and orange. Add to all that her flirty sandals, and the result is workplace "Wow!"
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2009
Not all the sights at Cirque du Soleil's "Kooza" were onstage. Just check out 20-year-old Allie Bulmer, who was in the opening-night audience. The Montgomery College student and waitress loves watching current trends and adapting them to her "sophisticated, sexy and a little bohemian" style. But, this Damascus resident is no fashion fascist. "Everyone has their own style. The fashion police may say don't do that, but let people do [what they want]. If it's last season and you like it, that's fine.
FEATURES
By JOHN WOESTENDIEK and JOHN WOESTENDIEK,SUN REPORTER | August 7, 2006
Kathleen Farrell has left a mark - thousands of them, in fact - on beaches she has never set foot on. Farrell, who lives in St. Petersburg, Fla., wasn't at the beach, but vacationing in the mountains of North Carolina in 1996 when inspiration struck: a newfangled way to spread not just "The Word," but three of them. Farrell, a clinical psychologist, sliced up an old inner tube, cut the pieces into letters, glued them backward on the soles of an old pair of sandals and then walked from wet grass onto wooden deck, leaving a trail of words behind her. The word "Jesus" was left by the right foot; the words "Loves You" by the left.
FEATURES
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | August 29, 2005
A laid-back surfer dude who shunned shoes, Sean Berg wanted to find a way to keep his toes warm in the winter. He was living on the Outer Banks of North Carolina, recently out of college, and running a newspaper-delivery company when not spending his time in the water. This was 1995, and Berg was a flip-flop devotee before they became trendy, before Northwestern University's women's lacrosse team wore them to the White House, before designers bejeweled them to sell at Neiman Marcus for $395.
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