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By Brant James and Brant James,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | October 4, 1996
Almost 6,000 bicyclists will traverse the pine forests and wind-swept sand dunes along the country roads of the southern Eastern Shore tomorrow, but they will not, repeat not, be racing. Most of the slow-motion procession of peddlers will have scenery, not victory on its mind in the eighth Sea Gull Century.A 100-mile, non-competitive one-day tour, the Sea Gull Century has grown from the notion of a group of Salisbury State faculty members into the third-largest event of its kind in the eastern United States.
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TRAVEL
By GORDON HUGGINS ELDERSBURG and GORDON HUGGINS ELDERSBURG,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 29, 2006
In June, my wife and I traveled to the Southwest for the first time, visiting Grand Canyon, Bryce and Zion national parks. We were most enthralled by the scenery of Monument Valley. Taking a half-day, 17-mile tour allowed us to see many hidden treasures of the valley. The tour is only available through Navajo guides in their four-wheel-drive vehicles, and the sights were indeed spectacular. Mesas like the Mittens, natural arches, sand dunes and petroglyphs were among the dramatic vistas we saw.
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TRAVEL
By Joshua S. Howes and Joshua S. Howes,Chicago Tribune | July 20, 2003
There are things that awe us to rapture -- grand canyons, wild cascades, the immense rolling ocean. And there are other things -- cool-rooted flowers, sunrise in a meadow -- that awe us to silence, that "seal the hushed casket of the soul," as John Keats said. The Sahara at night awes to silence. Yet the ordinary has a way of impinging on the sublime. While I was stretching my limbs atop the world's tallest sand dunes, my traveling companion, Mark, who had come to the Sahara hoping the great dunes might be the elixir for his broken heart, was shut away in a concrete toilet, victim of a bad bowl of tagine stew.
TRAVEL
By Robert Cross and Robert Cross,Chicago Tribune | July 3, 2005
All it needs is a camel, maybe a Bedouin tent, or a couple of date palms. The place is that deserty. Great Sand Dunes National Park is centered on mounds of sand that go for 30 square miles, right up against the sort of Colorado landscape one has every reason to expect: mountains with snow on top, rushing creeks, cactus, sagebrush, aspens, cottonwoods and ranchland dotted with grazing bison. The sand is what catches attention, some of it piled nearly eight stories high, magnificent but highly incongruous -- as if Hollywood remade Lawrence of Arabia as a Western.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | November 14, 1997
VERY FEW PEOPLE enjoy seeing farms and other open spaces go up in cookie-cutter subdivisions, but most are resigned to it."Soybeans and trees just can't compete with development prices for land," is the common wisdom.But think again. Just see what an old farmer and a young developer are doing with a unique site that is one of the prettiest along the entire shoreline of Chesapeake Bay.Near Eastville, in Northampton County on the Eastern Shore of Virginia, a series of ancient sand dunes rises from the bay beachfront as high as 70 feet.
FEATURES
By Ralph Marsh and Ralph Marsh,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | April 14, 1996
The land that is now Oklahoma was heralded as the adventurous man's last Eden. Free land! the fliers seeking settlers trumpeted. Grass belly-high to a tall horse! Deep black soil never touched by a plow!In fact, the appeal was so enticing that Okla huma -- "red human," in the Choctaw language -- was nicknamed the Sooner State when whites hungry for Indian soil couldn't wait for the crack of the pistol to start the great land runs of the 1880s and 1890s.Since those early days, the word "Oklahoma" has called to mind everything from the dusty misery of John Steinbeck's Depression-era novel "The Grapes of Wrath" to the farmers and cowmen who praised the "waving wheat that sure smells sweet" in the Rodgers and Hammerstein musical "Oklahoma!"
TRAVEL
By GORDON HUGGINS ELDERSBURG and GORDON HUGGINS ELDERSBURG,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 29, 2006
In June, my wife and I traveled to the Southwest for the first time, visiting Grand Canyon, Bryce and Zion national parks. We were most enthralled by the scenery of Monument Valley. Taking a half-day, 17-mile tour allowed us to see many hidden treasures of the valley. The tour is only available through Navajo guides in their four-wheel-drive vehicles, and the sights were indeed spectacular. Mesas like the Mittens, natural arches, sand dunes and petroglyphs were among the dramatic vistas we saw.
NEWS
By Susan Canfora | June 30, 1991
Ocean Pines seeks wastewater fundsThe community of Ocean Pines has asked Worcester County to pay for any increase in its wastewater treatment plant beyond what will be used by present homeowners and property owners. Currently, Ocean Pines has a 1.5 million gallon wastewater capacity and it's necessary to increase the capacity due to growth in the community.xTC There are many lots still unsold and undeveloped in the Pines, which is eight miles from Ocean City near Berlin, and current property owners say they don't want to pay for what they won't use.Sand pumping resumes in O.C.The project to widen Ocean City's recreational beaches by pumping sand from the ocean floor has resumed.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 9, 2003
SAN FRANCISCO - From the city's hilltops, the trees of the Presidio form luxurious green plumage against winter's crystalline skies. When the U.S. Army planted this urban forest - now a 1,480-acre national park - on ridges and wind-swept sand dunes in the 1880s, it imbued the trees of what was then a military post with deep symbolism. Maj. W.A. Jones, the landscape engineer, wrote that soaring Monterey cypress, eucalyptus and other trees would make the base appear imposing and "indirectly accentuate the idea of the power of government."
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 15, 1998
WASHINGTON -- The once obscure Delhi Sands Flower-Loving Fly, which spends nearly all of its short life buried under a few sand dunes in Southern California's San Bernardino County, may emerge this week at the center of a major legal battle over the reach of federal environmental laws. A broad coalition of developers, farmers and property rights activists has urged the Supreme Court to take up a San Bernardino case and use it as a vehicle to restrict drastically the scope of the Endangered Species Act. San Bernardino officials are hoping to be freed from federal regulations that restrict development.
TRAVEL
By Joshua S. Howes and Joshua S. Howes,Chicago Tribune | July 20, 2003
There are things that awe us to rapture -- grand canyons, wild cascades, the immense rolling ocean. And there are other things -- cool-rooted flowers, sunrise in a meadow -- that awe us to silence, that "seal the hushed casket of the soul," as John Keats said. The Sahara at night awes to silence. Yet the ordinary has a way of impinging on the sublime. While I was stretching my limbs atop the world's tallest sand dunes, my traveling companion, Mark, who had come to the Sahara hoping the great dunes might be the elixir for his broken heart, was shut away in a concrete toilet, victim of a bad bowl of tagine stew.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 9, 2003
SAN FRANCISCO - From the city's hilltops, the trees of the Presidio form luxurious green plumage against winter's crystalline skies. When the U.S. Army planted this urban forest - now a 1,480-acre national park - on ridges and wind-swept sand dunes in the 1880s, it imbued the trees of what was then a military post with deep symbolism. Maj. W.A. Jones, the landscape engineer, wrote that soaring Monterey cypress, eucalyptus and other trees would make the base appear imposing and "indirectly accentuate the idea of the power of government."
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 15, 1998
WASHINGTON -- The once obscure Delhi Sands Flower-Loving Fly, which spends nearly all of its short life buried under a few sand dunes in Southern California's San Bernardino County, may emerge this week at the center of a major legal battle over the reach of federal environmental laws. A broad coalition of developers, farmers and property rights activists has urged the Supreme Court to take up a San Bernardino case and use it as a vehicle to restrict drastically the scope of the Endangered Species Act. San Bernardino officials are hoping to be freed from federal regulations that restrict development.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | November 14, 1997
VERY FEW PEOPLE enjoy seeing farms and other open spaces go up in cookie-cutter subdivisions, but most are resigned to it."Soybeans and trees just can't compete with development prices for land," is the common wisdom.But think again. Just see what an old farmer and a young developer are doing with a unique site that is one of the prettiest along the entire shoreline of Chesapeake Bay.Near Eastville, in Northampton County on the Eastern Shore of Virginia, a series of ancient sand dunes rises from the bay beachfront as high as 70 feet.
SPORTS
By Brant James and Brant James,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | October 4, 1996
Almost 6,000 bicyclists will traverse the pine forests and wind-swept sand dunes along the country roads of the southern Eastern Shore tomorrow, but they will not, repeat not, be racing. Most of the slow-motion procession of peddlers will have scenery, not victory on its mind in the eighth Sea Gull Century.A 100-mile, non-competitive one-day tour, the Sea Gull Century has grown from the notion of a group of Salisbury State faculty members into the third-largest event of its kind in the eastern United States.
FEATURES
By Ralph Marsh and Ralph Marsh,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | April 14, 1996
The land that is now Oklahoma was heralded as the adventurous man's last Eden. Free land! the fliers seeking settlers trumpeted. Grass belly-high to a tall horse! Deep black soil never touched by a plow!In fact, the appeal was so enticing that Okla huma -- "red human," in the Choctaw language -- was nicknamed the Sooner State when whites hungry for Indian soil couldn't wait for the crack of the pistol to start the great land runs of the 1880s and 1890s.Since those early days, the word "Oklahoma" has called to mind everything from the dusty misery of John Steinbeck's Depression-era novel "The Grapes of Wrath" to the farmers and cowmen who praised the "waving wheat that sure smells sweet" in the Rodgers and Hammerstein musical "Oklahoma!"
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | November 23, 1993
BEIJING -- Among the sand dunes and the ruins of once flourishing oases on China's legendary Silk Road, archaeologists have dug up an ancient city that may have been inhabited by dropouts from Alexander the Great's army.The rediscovery of the mysterious city of Niya came 90 years after British explorer Sir Aurel Stein was led by villagers to its remains in 1903 and, according to the official New China news agency, "pillaged Greek-style furniture and ancient documents written in the long-dead Kharoshthi language."
NEWS
By Richard H. P. Sia and Richard H. P. Sia,Washington Bureau of The Sun | October 11, 1990
WASHINGTON -- Two Air Force pilots died yesterday when their F-111F fighter-bomber crashed on a pre-dawn training mission in the Arabian Peninsula -- the latest in a rash of accidents that have killed as many as 31 Americans since President Bush dispatched U.S. forces to the Persian Gulf two months ago.The Navy also ended its search for eight Marines lost and presumed killed in Monday's crash of two UH-1N Huey helicopters over the North Arabian Sea, Marine...
FEATURES
By Eileen Ogintz and Eileen Ogintz,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | July 16, 1995
The giant roller coaster swooped and climbed, carrying us over the giant mountains of sand that stretched endlessly in front of us. That's what it felt like, anyway, bumping along in the dune buggy, up and down the massive sand dunes -- some more than 400 feet high -- in the middle of the Oregon Dunes National Recreation Area near Florence, Ore.For once we grown-ups agreed with the children's assessment of the place: "Awesome," they said, once they had...
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | November 23, 1993
BEIJING -- Among the sand dunes and the ruins of once flourishing oases on China's legendary Silk Road, archaeologists have dug up an ancient city that may have been inhabited by dropouts from Alexander the Great's army.The rediscovery of the mysterious city of Niya came 90 years after British explorer Sir Aurel Stein was led by villagers to its remains in 1903 and, according to the official New China news agency, "pillaged Greek-style furniture and ancient documents written in the long-dead Kharoshthi language."
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