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Sanctions Against South

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NEWS
By MILLARD ARNOLD | June 23, 1991
Ablitzkrieg of last minute legislative activity by the South African parliament has largely fulfilled President F. W. de Klerk's five-month-old pledge to eradicate the remaining legal remnants apartheid.The recent repeal of the Group Areas Act, the various Land Acts and the Population and Registration Act, together with the ending of the state of emergency, the release of most political prisoners and the return old exiles seemingly substantiates Mr. de Klerk's claim that he is laying the foundation for a "New South Africa."
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NEWS
By RICHARD W. TORGERSON | April 28, 1994
Removal of anti-apartheid sanctions against South Africa freed $850 million in aid from the International Monetary Fund. Dwarfing this figure is over $600 billion in private funds that during the apartheid years had been barred from South African investment.Perhaps you remember watching news reports of students building ''shanties'' on campuses or noisy demonstrators disrupting Baltimore City Council meetings to protest South African apartheid. It was easy to condemn such symbolic acts as futile and ridiculous.
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NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | July 8, 1991
DURBAN, South Africa -- The African National Congress, wrapping up its historic five-day conference, softened its position yesterday on international sanctions against the Pretoria government.In the face of an erosion of sanctions by other nations, the ANC said that it would be more flexible on the issue in the future and that it would support a phasing-out of sanctions as the government of President F. W. de Klerk makes increasing progress in ending apartheid and negotiating a new constitution.
NEWS
October 25, 1993
Local governments deal with local affairs. That used to be the ironclad rule everywhere in America outside the radical citadel of Berkeley, Calif., which ever since the Vietnam War has been trying to run the world.All that changed in the mid-1980s, though, when two foreign policy issues became so compelling that hundreds of other local governments felt they, too, had to take a stand. One of those issues was South Africa's segregationist apartheid system; the other was nuclear weaponry.While "nuclear free zones" still exist (Baltimore City and Takoma Park are among such in Maryland)
NEWS
July 10, 1991
President Bush today lifted the five-year-old economic sanctions against South Africa.Bush, acting in the face of opposition from some key Democrats and the NAACP, said he expected continued progress toward equality, and added that an arms embargo would remain in effect.See stories on A12.
NEWS
September 26, 1993
The private and public sectors should heed the White House call to end economic sanctions against South Africa. Divestment, disinvestment, the Sullivan principles, the sports boycott and other mechanisms designed to force South Africa to end oppression of its black majority worked. Too slowly, but without war. It's time to claim victory.Nelson Mandela told the United Nations Special Committee Against Apartheid on Friday, "We believe the time has come when the international community should lift all economic sanctions against South Africa."
NEWS
October 25, 1993
Flashback to 1985: After a prolonged and heated debate, the Baltimore City Council approved a call for municipal pension funds to divest themselves from any investments in companies dealing with South Africa. But pension trustees dragged their feet, adopting guidelines which permitted the continuation of already made investments and barred only new ones."This is very ticklish," a city employees' union official said at the time about the investment restrictions. "The feeling I get from the general membership is that something has to be done, but not by cutting the throats of the retirees."
NEWS
June 9, 1991
Even while his negotiations with the African National Congress stall over tribal strife, President F. W. de Klerk makes sanctions against South Africa harder to sustain. The repeal of the historic Group Areas Act and Land Acts dismantle the principal legal buttresses of South Africa's apartheid. One giant legal pillar remains, the Population Registration Act, which provides for everyone to be classified by race. The government does not know how to maintain the separate parliamentary chambers without that registration, so it looks like that law stays on the books until the next regime is negotiated.
NEWS
By The Providence (R.I.) Journal | July 24, 1991
PRESIDENT BUSH'S decision to lift economic sanctions against South Africa is good news -- especially for black South Africans, who have been materially hurt more than anyone by the effects of these penalties.Pretoria has made extraordinary strides toward democracy and the removal of the ghastly system of apartheid.Much more needs to be done and the democratic world is obligated to keep pushing. But the reform process is far advanced..It is doubtful that sanctions ever had quite the effect in pushing South Africa toward liberalization that proponents asserted.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | February 9, 1991
CAPE TOWN, South Africa -- Black leader Nelson Mandela warned yesterday that there would be mass turmoil throughout the country if the European Community lifted sanctions against South Africa, as it is contemplating.Mr. Mandela said he doubted that the European Community actually would end the sanctions. But if it did, he said, it would be "a very serious mistake.""If the EC decides to review sanctions, you can expect that mass action in this country is going to be the order of the day and that the situation is going to be so unstable that no wise businessman is going to want to invest in this country," Mr. Mandela said at a news conference in Cape Town.
NEWS
October 25, 1993
Flashback to 1985: After a prolonged and heated debate, the Baltimore City Council approved a call for municipal pension funds to divest themselves from any investments in companies dealing with South Africa. But pension trustees dragged their feet, adopting guidelines which permitted the continuation of already made investments and barred only new ones."This is very ticklish," a city employees' union official said at the time about the investment restrictions. "The feeling I get from the general membership is that something has to be done, but not by cutting the throats of the retirees."
NEWS
By WILEY A. HALL | September 28, 1993
Two signs sit in front of West Baltimore's Bethel A.M.E. Church, one of the oldest African American churches in the country. One sign says, "Free South Africa." That sign seems to have been there for as long as I've been in Baltimore: nearly 20 years.The other, featuring the colors of South Africa's African National Congress, reads, "Abolish Apartheid. Keep Sanctions." As far as I can tell, it is brand new.Here's the irony: The older sign is still relevant after all these years. The struggle for freedom for black South Africans continues despite breathtaking progress toward the dismantling of apartheid and the establishment of a new constitution guaranteeing South Africans of all races the right to vote.
NEWS
September 26, 1993
The private and public sectors should heed the White House call to end economic sanctions against South Africa. Divestment, disinvestment, the Sullivan principles, the sports boycott and other mechanisms designed to force South Africa to end oppression of its black majority worked. Too slowly, but without war. It's time to claim victory.Nelson Mandela told the United Nations Special Committee Against Apartheid on Friday, "We believe the time has come when the international community should lift all economic sanctions against South Africa."
NEWS
July 6, 1993
The declaration of next April 27 as the date for universal elections in South Africa sets transition to a multi-racial society on a firm timetable. Electoral politicking begins now. Even though both black and white conservatives holding out for a federal system did not agree to the date, most of the 26 parties to constitutional talks in Johannesburg did. There now is confidence the election and the transition will occur.The agreement was part of the grand bargain President F. W. de Klerk and ANC leader Nelson Mandela hoped to present during their simultaneous visits to this country.
NEWS
By Michael A. Fletcher and Michael A. Fletcher,Staff Writer | October 15, 1992
Simultaneously spiritual, humorous and powerfully optimistic during an address at the Johns Hopkins University yesterday, South African Archbishop Desmond Tutu said that blacks in his country will be liberated soon."
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Staff Writer | April 10, 1992
ABUJA, Nigeria -- South Africa scored a major breakthrough on the road to respectability yesterday when President Frederik W. de Klerk arrived in Nigeria for an official visit that symbolized his country's new status in Africa.It was the first visit to Nigeria by a South African head of state and a sign of improved relations between South Africa and the rest of the continent as a result of Mr. de Klerk's policy of dismantling the apartheid system.Mr. de Klerk was welcomed by President Ibrahim Babangida as "the man who closed the book on apartheid.
NEWS
By Stephen Kurkjian and Stephen Kurkjian,Boston Globe | July 9, 1991
WASHINGTON -- President Bush has decided to lift economic sanctions against South Africa and will announce that decision this week, administration officials said last night.The officials, who declined to be identified, said Mr. Bush decided to lift the sanctions -- at least temporarily -- after a State Department team of advisers determined that the South African government was complying with the congressional condition of releasing political prisoners. That is the fifth and final requirement to be met before sanctions could be lifted.
NEWS
By RICHARD W. TORGERSON | April 28, 1994
Removal of anti-apartheid sanctions against South Africa freed $850 million in aid from the International Monetary Fund. Dwarfing this figure is over $600 billion in private funds that during the apartheid years had been barred from South African investment.Perhaps you remember watching news reports of students building ''shanties'' on campuses or noisy demonstrators disrupting Baltimore City Council meetings to protest South African apartheid. It was easy to condemn such symbolic acts as futile and ridiculous.
NEWS
By The Providence (R.I.) Journal | July 24, 1991
PRESIDENT BUSH'S decision to lift economic sanctions against South Africa is good news -- especially for black South Africans, who have been materially hurt more than anyone by the effects of these penalties.Pretoria has made extraordinary strides toward democracy and the removal of the ghastly system of apartheid.Much more needs to be done and the democratic world is obligated to keep pushing. But the reform process is far advanced..It is doubtful that sanctions ever had quite the effect in pushing South Africa toward liberalization that proponents asserted.
NEWS
By Peter Honey and Peter Honey,Washington Bureau of The Sun | July 14, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The removal of core U.S. trade and investment sanctions against South Africa still leaves a maze of anti-apartheid measures at state, city and local levels that may well obstruct dealings with that country long after apartheid's demise.From Baltimore to Los Angeles, Vermont to Louisiana, cities and states generally have spurned President Bush's urgings last week to follow his lead in lifting the strictures.It is too early, they say. Full equality for black South Africans still is not in place.
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