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NEWS
December 8, 2011
Jennifer Laszlo Mizrahi's five steps for dealing with Iran are steps to confrontation disguised as an alternative to war ("Five steps to isolate Iran," Dec. 6). Sanctions are self-evidently counter-productive as a means to stop or alter Iran's nuclear research and development when the motive behind sanctions is punishment or regime change. The premise of the sanctions - that the problem is with Iran exclusively - ignores the nuclear neighborhood that Iran lives in and our own desire to dominate the region.
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BUSINESS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2014
The Baltimore Orioles defied an order from commissioner Bud Selig to appear at a sanctions hearing, another sign of the team's widening rift with Major League Baseball. The hearing, which was canceled, was disclosed in documents filed in a New York court where the Orioles-controlled Mid-Atlantic Sports Network is seeking to void a recent decision by a league committee that would force the network to pay substantially higher TV rights fees to the Washington Nationals. The documents also disclose that MASN filed an arbitration claim last month against Major League Baseball seeking $800 million to compensate for damages the network says it would sustain if the panel's decision is allowed to stand.
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NEWS
August 2, 2014
Politicians and pundits are often blind to the political effects of sanctions ( "Standing up to Moscow," July 29). But history shows that placing sanctions on Russia is likely to backfire. After the first round of sanctions, Russian President Vladimir Putin's approval rating skyrocketed to a record 83 percent. Thanks to the U.S., the Moscovian menace can now use sanctions to unite Russians against the West and rally support to his side. Moreover, sanctions increase the likelihood of forceful retaliation in 95 percent of instances because leaders tend to escalate conflicts to save their own and their country's reputation.
NEWS
August 2, 2014
Politicians and pundits are often blind to the political effects of sanctions ( "Standing up to Moscow," July 29). But history shows that placing sanctions on Russia is likely to backfire. After the first round of sanctions, Russian President Vladimir Putin's approval rating skyrocketed to a record 83 percent. Thanks to the U.S., the Moscovian menace can now use sanctions to unite Russians against the West and rally support to his side. Moreover, sanctions increase the likelihood of forceful retaliation in 95 percent of instances because leaders tend to escalate conflicts to save their own and their country's reputation.
NEWS
February 26, 1991
Last year, President Bush vetoed a congressional measure that would have imposed sanctions on countries and companies that developed or used chemical or biological weapons. Bush objected that the bill would not give the president the ability to waive sanctions if he thought that would be in the national interest. The bill would have slapped sanctions on Saddam Hussein and his suppliers, but a year ago the Bush administration was more concerned with cultivating his friendship than curbing his ability to make war.Now the world is a different place.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2013
Towson University's championship cheerleading team will be allowed to practice but not perform after an appeals committee decided to significantly reduce the sanctions over an alleged hazing incident, school officials said Tuesday. Towson University's Student Appeals Committee put members of this year's cheerleading team on "social probation," saying that the team will not be allowed to perform or appear at any university or off-campus event, including athletic competitions. The sanction applies only for the fall semester.
NEWS
By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2014
Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski is leading a group of women who on Tuesday called for tougher international sanctions against an organization that kidnapped more than 200 girls in Nigeria last month. The Maryland Democrat along with Republican Sen. Susan Collins of Maine, organized a letter Tuesday to President Obama, urging him to advocate for tougher international sanctions against Islamic terror group Boko Haram, which has claimed responsibility for the kidnappings. The bipartisan letter was signed by all 20 women senators.
SPORTS
By Steven Petrella and The Baltimore Sun | July 23, 2012
NCAA president Mark Emmert brought down the proverbial hammer on Penn State Monday morning, imposing severe sanctions that will likely cripple the program for at least a decade. The school received a four-year bowl ban, 10 less scholarships per year until 2014-15, a $60 million fine, and all wins from 1998-2011 will be vacated in the wake of the Jerry Sandusky child-abuse scandal.  The program will not cease operation or receive the so-called 'death penalty,' which many in the national media called for. Some experts have said the sanctions imposed are actually worse than the suspension of a season.
NEWS
By Michael Casey Jr | December 14, 2009
I n the interminable efforts to halt Iran's uranium enrichment program, the Iranian regime has once again demonstrated its recalcitrance. The recent pronouncement of Mohamed ElBaradei, head of the International Atomic Energy Agency, that policymakers have reached a "dead end" appears prophetic. Bureaucrats in Brussels, Whitehall and Washington surely are scrambling back to their drawing boards and are likely looking to "crippling" sanctions as the next step. History has proven, however, that while sanctions rob the regime of capabilities and resources, they fail to alter its intentions.
NEWS
December 10, 1990
The closer Nelson Mandela and his African National Congress get to sharing power with the government of South Africa, the greater will be their need to produce higher living standards for the black majority they represent. It can't be done while South Africa's stagnant economy fails to keep pace with population growth. It can't be done without importing capital. It can't be done in economic isolation, of which foreign economic sanctions are a part. With constitutional talks scheduled, it is certain that at some point Mr. Mandela will become a spokesman for lifting sanctions.
NEWS
July 29, 2014
After months of resisting U.S. calls for tougher economic sanctions against Russia in response to its support for separatist rebels in Ukraine, the major European powers agreed yesterday on a package of measures targeting Russia's financial, energy and military sectors that in some cases go even farther than the actions the U.S. itself has taken. Whether that will be enough to alter Russian President Vladimir Putin's calculations in the covert war he is waging in Ukraine remains to be seen.
NEWS
July 15, 2014
The recent commentary, "An enemy revisited" (July 13), correctly states that in witnessing the harsh realities "the United States would do well to reassess its view on Iran. " In fact, we should have a dialogue and trade with Iran, a country that does not threaten U.S. national interests. The U.S. Chamber of Commerce and The Business Roundtable have both called for an end to sanctions on Iran, stating that these sanctions have cost U.S. businesses $25 billion and a loss of 210,000 American jobs.
NEWS
By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2014
Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski is leading a group of women who on Tuesday called for tougher international sanctions against an organization that kidnapped more than 200 girls in Nigeria last month. The Maryland Democrat along with Republican Sen. Susan Collins of Maine, organized a letter Tuesday to President Obama, urging him to advocate for tougher international sanctions against Islamic terror group Boko Haram, which has claimed responsibility for the kidnappings. The bipartisan letter was signed by all 20 women senators.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | April 25, 2014
Sen. John McCain, who endlessly enjoys twisting the tail of what he suggests is a paper tiger in the White House, has altered the old Teddy Roosevelt axiom. He accuses President Obama of talking tough but carrying a big "twig. " Thus does he lament the president's penchant for drawing red lines on adversaries' foreign-policy misconduct, followed by subsequent timidity. He cites Obama's harsh words against Syrian atrocities and lack of action against them, and his mild sanctions in response to the recent Russian interventions in Crimea and eastern Ukraine.
NEWS
By Rachel Marsden | March 24, 2014
There are fewer things more pathetic than watching someone take a running dive off a high board only to end in a spectacular belly flop and still think that they're scoring a perfect 10. That's President Barack Obama right now on the issue of sanctions against Russia. It's a worrying attitude that increasingly permeates Western culture. Europe and America supported a coup d'état against a democratically elected government and president in the Ukrainian capital of Kiev, which in turn led to Russia backing a democratic vote March 16 in Crimea -- the southeast corner of the country -- to reject the coup and separate.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | March 22, 2014
What is it about Western leaders from Neville Chamberlain to George W. Bush who want to find good in men of bad character? Acting as if he were endowed by special insight bestowed upon no one else, President George W. Bush declared in 2001 that he had looked Vladimir Putin in the eye and "was able to get a sense of his soul. " According to the Daily Caller.com, in a 2010 interview with talk radio host Hugh Hewitt, Mr. Bush, who was promoting his book "Decision Points," was asked about his ability to see into the souls of men. The former president explained, "The reason why I said that is because I remembered him talking movingly about his mother and the cross that she gave him that she said she had blessed in Jerusalem.
NEWS
April 16, 1992
The sanctions taken against Libya will not unduly inconvenience that regime. The diplomats being expelled from other countries were not carrying on normal relations anyway. The arms that won't be sold for the duration of the sanctions would not have altered Libya's capacity to harm its neighbors, which is real but limited. The passengers who won't be able to fly to Tripoli will need an extra day to drive in from Tunisia or Egypt.So starts the first round in a test of will between Libyan President Muammar el Kadafi and the world community.
NEWS
December 18, 1990
The African National Congress celebrated its first national conference in South Africa in 31 years by refusing to split, while taking harder lines than its elderly leaders wanted. As it marches uncertainly from ineffective opposition toward a role in ruling the country, the ANC courts a split at every step. The question is not whether it should but whether it can avoid doing so prematurely.No sooner had the organization's revered President Oliver Tambo returned from long exile and illness to question the ANC's commitment to economic sanctions against its own country, than the younger delegates reiterated that commitment.
NEWS
March 10, 2014
The decisions taken by the American Studies Association, a small, relatively obscure scholarly organization devoted to the study of American history and culture, rarely resonate much beyond the ivied walls of academe. But earlier this year the group created an unaccustomed stir when its members voted to endorse a boycott of Israeli academic institutions as a way of protesting that country's treatment of Palestinians. Supporters of the Jewish state were quick to denounce the move as anti-Semitic and anti-Israel, a charge the ASA denied.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser | February 21, 2014
Supporters of Democratic gubernatorial candidate Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler are asking a court to impose sanctions against Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown and his running mate for failing to disclose earlier that they did not intend to raise money during the 90-day General Assembly session. Daniel M. Clements, the lawyer representing two Gansler backers in a suit that sought to bar Howard County Executive Ken Ulman from raising funds during the session, told the Anne Arundel County Circuit Court that it was "stunningly inappropriate" that Brown disclosed his ticket's intent to refrain from accepting donations before the session ends in a letter to the Washington Post.
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