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By Joe Crea and Joe Crea,Orange County Register | January 27, 1991
It has been called "The Enchanted Hill" and a great many less favorable things. Depending upon the viewer's perspective, San Simeon -- the vast and mind-boggling castle built between 1919 and 1947 for William Randolph Hearst -- is either a majestic and unbelievable fairy tale spun from an American dream, or a dreadfully overblown bastardization of classical style laden with plundered treasures.Whatever your view, Hearst's home just north of Morro Bay is a spectacle of the first order. Declared a California State Historical Monument and opened to the public in 1958, San Simeon offers a glimpse into the grandiose way American royalty -- in Hearst's case, a media czar who doted on the Hollywood set -- lived and entertained.
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By Christopher Reynolds and Christopher Reynolds,Los Angeles Times | February 3, 2008
SAN SIMEON, CALIF. -- It doesn't take long, wandering behind the scenes among the 38 bedrooms and 41 bathrooms (not counting those in the guest quarters next door), to sense a few differences between your house and Hearst Castle. The museum accreditation, for instance. The paid staff of 234, not counting the food, gift shop, bus and movie concessions. The conservator in the billiard room delicately applying a brush to an ornate pine ceiling that dates to 15th-century Spain. "Hearst acquired it, I think, in 1930 or '31," says Gary Hulbert, the conservator, peering down from his perch on a metal scaffold.
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TRAVEL
By Christopher Reynolds and Christopher Reynolds,Los Angeles Times | February 3, 2008
SAN SIMEON, CALIF. -- It doesn't take long, wandering behind the scenes among the 38 bedrooms and 41 bathrooms (not counting those in the guest quarters next door), to sense a few differences between your house and Hearst Castle. The museum accreditation, for instance. The paid staff of 234, not counting the food, gift shop, bus and movie concessions. The conservator in the billiard room delicately applying a brush to an ornate pine ceiling that dates to 15th-century Spain. "Hearst acquired it, I think, in 1930 or '31," says Gary Hulbert, the conservator, peering down from his perch on a metal scaffold.
FEATURES
By SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER | September 9, 1997
SEATTLE -- Not since newspaper baron William Randolph Hearst Sr. built his grandiose 165-room castle on a hilltop overlooking the Pacific Ocean at San Simeon, Calif., has America been so fascinated by a private residence of the rich and famous.Welcome to San Simeon North, the high-tech Xanadu of William Henry Gates III, richest guy on the planet.Seven years after construction began on a project expected to take about half that long, the Microsoft mogul's futuristic dream home on the shores of Lake Washington across from Seattle is nearing completion.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 4, 1996
SAN SIMEON, Calif. -- For the better part of a century, the mountains and coastal moors that William Randolph Hearst regarded as the most beautiful countryside on earth have remained almost as wild and empty as when he first saw them. And bought them.Along with nearby Big Sur, San Simeon is an epic stretch ofsculpted rock, roiling sea and teeming wildlife that makes the central coast of California one of nature's grand stage sets.Yet this land is also private property, where the publishing magnate built his legendary castle and amassed a 77,000-acre ranch.
FEATURES
By Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel | May 8, 1994
Q: We'll be flying to California in June and plan to rent a car and explore. Can you tell me something about the old Spanish missions? We'd like to visit some.A: If you started in San Diego and drove north, you could spend a whole vacation going from mission to mission. You could stay at Clint Eastwood's hotel/restaurant on part of the Carmel Mission property and visit William Randolph Hearst's "Castle" at San Simeon, on land that was once San Miguel mission.The 21 missions built by Spanish Franciscan friars in the late-18th and early-19th centuries are strung out for 600 miles from San Diego to Sonoma, meant to be a day's horse back ride apart along the Camino Real, the King's Highway, roughly the route of today's U.S. 101.They're beautiful adobe and brick buildings with red-tiled roofs, weathered arches, bell towers and handsome colonnades, dressed up with fountains, grape arbors, trees and flowers.
FEATURES
By SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER | September 9, 1997
SEATTLE -- Not since newspaper baron William Randolph Hearst Sr. built his grandiose 165-room castle on a hilltop overlooking the Pacific Ocean at San Simeon, Calif., has America been so fascinated by a private residence of the rich and famous.Welcome to San Simeon North, the high-tech Xanadu of William Henry Gates III, richest guy on the planet.Seven years after construction began on a project expected to take about half that long, the Microsoft mogul's futuristic dream home on the shores of Lake Washington across from Seattle is nearing completion.
FEATURES
By Robert Cross and Robert Cross,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 10, 1995
SAN SIMEON, Calif. -- On the six-mile bus ride up to Hearst Castle, a public-address system blasted passengers with music from the Roaring '20s: trilling saxophones, waa-waa trumpets, simple tunes and lame syncopation. Then a crackle of annoying static broke in, followed by the sandpapery voice of an old-time announcer:"Hearst Castle Radio is on the air! Decades in Review!"It's 1919, and the end of the decade sees changes in the states, the nation and the world!"Dateline: San Simeon, California.
FEATURES
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 11, 1997
On a trip to the Northwest this summer, we would like to see the large home that Bill Gates, Microsoft's founder, has built near Seattle. Can we see it from the street?From George Vanderbilt's Biltmore Estate in Asheville, N.C., to William Randolph Hearst's castle in San Simeon, Calif., the homes of America's rich have long fascinated travelers. But there's no reason to bother Gates' neighbors if you want to gawk at his 37,000-square-foot house, which is estimated to have cost as much as $35 million.
NEWS
October 6, 2005
Laurette D. Chambers, a former Red Cross volunteer driver who traveled widely, died of pneumonia Sept. 29 at Blakehurst Retirement Community. The former Woodbrook resident was 83. Born Laurette Debnam in Baltimore and raised in Woodbrook, she was a 1939 graduate of the old Greenwood School. She attended the Maryland Institute College of Art. Family members said she often accompanied her father, George R. Debnam Jr., a Sun reporter who later built apartment houses in Charles Village, on long car trips.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 4, 1996
SAN SIMEON, Calif. -- For the better part of a century, the mountains and coastal moors that William Randolph Hearst regarded as the most beautiful countryside on earth have remained almost as wild and empty as when he first saw them. And bought them.Along with nearby Big Sur, San Simeon is an epic stretch ofsculpted rock, roiling sea and teeming wildlife that makes the central coast of California one of nature's grand stage sets.Yet this land is also private property, where the publishing magnate built his legendary castle and amassed a 77,000-acre ranch.
FEATURES
By Robert Cross and Robert Cross,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 10, 1995
SAN SIMEON, Calif. -- On the six-mile bus ride up to Hearst Castle, a public-address system blasted passengers with music from the Roaring '20s: trilling saxophones, waa-waa trumpets, simple tunes and lame syncopation. Then a crackle of annoying static broke in, followed by the sandpapery voice of an old-time announcer:"Hearst Castle Radio is on the air! Decades in Review!"It's 1919, and the end of the decade sees changes in the states, the nation and the world!"Dateline: San Simeon, California.
FEATURES
By Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel | May 8, 1994
Q: We'll be flying to California in June and plan to rent a car and explore. Can you tell me something about the old Spanish missions? We'd like to visit some.A: If you started in San Diego and drove north, you could spend a whole vacation going from mission to mission. You could stay at Clint Eastwood's hotel/restaurant on part of the Carmel Mission property and visit William Randolph Hearst's "Castle" at San Simeon, on land that was once San Miguel mission.The 21 missions built by Spanish Franciscan friars in the late-18th and early-19th centuries are strung out for 600 miles from San Diego to Sonoma, meant to be a day's horse back ride apart along the Camino Real, the King's Highway, roughly the route of today's U.S. 101.They're beautiful adobe and brick buildings with red-tiled roofs, weathered arches, bell towers and handsome colonnades, dressed up with fountains, grape arbors, trees and flowers.
FEATURES
By Joe Crea and Joe Crea,Orange County Register | January 27, 1991
It has been called "The Enchanted Hill" and a great many less favorable things. Depending upon the viewer's perspective, San Simeon -- the vast and mind-boggling castle built between 1919 and 1947 for William Randolph Hearst -- is either a majestic and unbelievable fairy tale spun from an American dream, or a dreadfully overblown bastardization of classical style laden with plundered treasures.Whatever your view, Hearst's home just north of Morro Bay is a spectacle of the first order. Declared a California State Historical Monument and opened to the public in 1958, San Simeon offers a glimpse into the grandiose way American royalty -- in Hearst's case, a media czar who doted on the Hollywood set -- lived and entertained.
NEWS
March 3, 2001
So many classes ... ALL IN FAVOR of a longer school day, raise your hands. Ah, we see a few arms in the air, and we understand why. There's never enough time. The constraints are getting tighter in Anne Arundel County, where the school board recently voted to double the time sixth-graders spend on reading instruction - a necessary move in light of slacking reading performance on standardized tests. Now, Superintendent Carol S. Parham and her middle school principals must face a new challenge: how to carve out time for extra reading instruction without debilitating arts education.
BUSINESS
July 25, 2004
Fascination with wealth and the display of wealth - priceless. The ancient Egyptians are proof of the maxim that "you can't take it with you." The riches in their pyramids only got as far as the hands of greedy tomb robbers, not the afterlife as originally intended. Even now, some folks seek to control their wealth from the grave by setting up wills with endless stipulations to ensure that surviving relatives live in the manner and on the timetable that their benefactor wished. Results on these are mixed.
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