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By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Sun Staff Writer | November 16, 1994
The connection was forged during the Salvadoran civil war and nurtured through times of poverty and upheaval.This week, members of St. John the Evangelist Roman Catholic Church in Columbia met with their brethren at the parish of San Roque in San Salvador, the Columbia church's sister parish since 1987.The Rev. Richard Henry Tillman and three church members, who return Friday, made the week-long trip to deliver $5,000 in medical supplies and 33 pairs of prescription eye glasses to needy Salvadorans.
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NEWS
August 2, 2014
How is it that within the past week Ray Rice has managed to be featured in two front page articles in The Sun while a gathering of 300 clergy and laity in McKeldin Square failed to capture even a paragraph inside the newspaper? The purpose of the prayer service was to call attention to the fact that there are many people of faith who are deeply concerned about the child refugee crisis we are experiencing, not only on our southern borders but here in Baltimore as well. We are not the constituency greeting buses filled with these children, screaming for them to return where they came from.
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NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | October 18, 1993
MANAGUA, Nicaragua -- The prostitutes stalking the streets that ring the volcanic hills and craters of this gritty capital are young -- very young. Some have barely reached their teens. Some say they are selling sex to feed their starving siblings. Some say they were sent to this job by their unemployed, single mothers."I try to help them," says the Rev. Xabier Gorostiaga, rector of the Jesuit University of Central America. "I tell them I can give them a scholarship to the university. But they say, 'I already have a scholarship to the university.
NEWS
By Garrison Keillor | March 31, 2010
I t is spring glorious spring (da do ron ron ron da do ron ron), and our gallant president has rallied his fractious forces against wacko demagoguery, the crocuses are up, and birds are returning from the South, preferring to raise their children here in Minnesota where we pull our pants on one leg at a time and not all at once. Some people in Washington haven't managed to get their pants on in years. Slowly, slowly, the simple fact dawns on the electorate that the Democrats have passed a moderate Republican health care reform.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | May 25, 1995
SAN SALVADOR, El Salvador -- The name is almost comically sinister, and Salvadorans are quick to share some gallows humor over "The Black Shadow."But when the laughing stops, people who have suffered through death-squad terror and civil war acknowledge that there's something unsettling about this vigilante group called La Sombra Negra.About three dozen murders, most committed against suspected criminals, have been attributed to The Black Shadow's "social cleansing" since the group became known in late February.
NEWS
By Tim Golden and Tim Golden,New York Times News Service | March 15, 1993
UNITED NATIONS -- A United Nations-sponsored investigation into the most notorious violence of El Salvador's civil war has found active and retired military officers responsible for the killings of thousands of civilians, including the archbishop of San Salvador, people who have seen the report said yesterday night.They said the report names the Salvadoran defense minister, Gen. Rene Emilio Ponce, who offered his resignation Friday, as one of a group of senior officers who ordered the killing of six Jesuit priests in 1989.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 2, 1993
SAN SALVADOR, El Salvador -- Two army officers convicted in the 1989 murders of six Jesuit priests, their cook and her daughter were ordered released from prison yesterday as part of a new blanket amnesty sponsored by President Alfredo Cristiani.In response to U.S. pressure, however, government officials now say the amnesty, decreed last month for all Salvadorans guilty of war crimes, will not be granted to leftist guerrillas who killed U.S. servicemen during the conflict.The officers convicted in the Jesuits' murders, Col. Guillermo Alfredo Benavides and Lt. Yusshy Rene Mendoza, had been sentenced to 30 years in prison.
NEWS
By Fiona Neill and Fiona Neill,Contributing Writer | March 28, 1993
MARIA MADRE DE LOS POBRES, El Salvador -- It's a long way from Taneytown to the parish of Maria Madre de los Pobres, an impoverished shanty town on the edge of the capital, San Salvador.But last Sunday, Carroll County's Jim Small was among the congregation gathered in the small church to commemorate the 13th anniversary of the killing of Salvadoran Archbishop Oscar Arnulfo Romero.The 52-year-old owner of Taneytown Auto Parts Inc. and Small & Sons Auto Parts in Emmitsburg was one of a two-person team that drove more than 4,000 miles from Baltimore to San Salvador.
NEWS
August 6, 1992
Sisters establishing 'sister' cityA delegation sponsored by the Sisters of Mercy Baltimore Regional Community is scheduled to return Saturday from a weeklong trip to El Salvador, where members helped develop a medicinal herb garden and a building to dry and package herbs.The delegation's eight members are establishing a "sister city" relationship between the Sisters of Mercy and the village of Calle Real outside of the capital, San Salvador.In 1990, the Catholic Archdiocese of San Salvador provided start-up money for the herbal garden, uniting native knowledge of herbs with the scientific study of herbal medicine at the National University of El Salvador.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | December 14, 1992
SAN SALVADOR, El Salvador -- Forty-eight hours before the formal end to El Salvador's civil war, leftist guerrillas, government officials and mediators were locked in intense negotiations yesterday over important political reforms, including long-term security for former rebel fighters.The brinkmanship comes even as Vice President Dan Quayle and other regional leaders prepare to attend tomorrow's ceremony in San Salvador marking the conclusion of 12 years of war between rebels and U.S.-backed forces.
NEWS
By Marla Dickerson and Marla Dickerson,Los Angeles Times | July 8, 2007
SAN SALVADOR, El Salvador -- It was a story of hope: a Central American sweatshop transformed into a unionized, worker-run apparel factory thanks to nearly $600,000 in loans and donations, including help from retailers Gap and Land's End, and the AFL-CIO. Boosters traveled to U.S. college campuses and church basements, promoting the Just Garments plant in El Salvador as a company looking to do well by doing right by employees. Impoverished Salvadorans saw a chance to earn better wages and to have a say in their future.
NEWS
By KELLY BREWINGTON and KELLY BREWINGTON,SUN REPORTER | June 9, 2006
At a West Indian club in Park Heights, they're readying the menu and the calypso music. In the ballroom of a Korean mall in Catonsville, the fans are hooking up the satellite feeds. And in Baltimore's Highlandtown, immigrant merchants old and new are preparing their bars and restaurants to be the epicenter for viewing the soccer world's most revered competition: the World Cup. The fervor of international soccer might be lost on many Americans, but don't tell that to those in the Baltimore area's ethnic enclaves where fans have been preparing for weeks in anticipation of the monthlong event, which starts today.
NEWS
By G. JEFFERSON PRICE III | May 2, 2006
SAN SALVADOR, EL SALVADOR -- This is about the other end of the immigration line, the other side of the story. It's about the importance of solidarity between the haves of the developed world and the have-nots of the underdeveloped world. It's about making life better for the have-nots so they have an alternative to leaving their homelands and their families to look for work in strange countries. In this hemisphere, that's mainly the United States. El Salvador is full of have-nots, including tens of thousands of farmers who can barely make ends meet in a country that was ravaged by civil war for 12 years in the 1980s and the early 1990s, and by devastating storms and earthquakes.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | May 1, 2003
A Millersville man apprehended in Central America under a false identity admitted yesterday killing a man after a 1997 dispute at a local bar and, under terms of a plea agreement, will be sentenced to 17 years in prison and five years of probation. Nathan G. Brown III, 30, pleaded guilty in Anne Arundel County Circuit Court to manslaughter and felony assault in the fatal shooting of a Gambrills man and for firing at his companions. Originally charged with murder, Brown faced a potential life sentence in the Oct. 16, 1997, killing of Jeffrey Watson, 19. The prosecutor and defense lawyers said that issues with the 6-year-old case, including that witnesses had been drinking the night of the slaying and that Brown was so drunk that the defense could have contended he was reasonably acting in self-defense, led to the negotiated plea.
TOPIC
By Rick Rockwell and Kristin Neubauer | July 29, 2001
PRESIDENT Bush likes to remind the foreign policy establishment that his ideas are good for business. He believes, as he argued on behalf of China's inclusion in the World Trade Organization, that "free trade supports and sustains freedom in all its forms." This simple sloganeering often sells many on the idea that commerce creates democracy. The intertwining of these concepts is an effective way to silence critics of policies that have little to do with democracy but a lot to do with economic power.
NEWS
By Kathy Curtis and Kathy Curtis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 19, 1998
THE PEOPLE of El Salvador "want people to pray and to walk with them in their struggles," reported Jane Collins, who returned to her Longfellow home last month after a 10-day trip to the Central American nation.The Salvadorans are rebuilding their country after the 12-year civil war that ended in 1992, but, Collins said, the struggle for human rights continues. "They really want the people of the United States to remember them," she said.Collins is a choir member and youth leader at St. John the Evangelist Roman Catholic Church, which has had a sister parish in San Roque, San Salvador, since the mid-1980s.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 22, 1998
SAN SALVADOR, El Salvador -- Sparking new controversy in one of the most publicized cases in the prolonged, costly U.S. involvement in Central America's civil wars, Salvadoran authorities yesterday authorized the parole of three of the five soldiers convicted of killing four American religious women in 1980.Reports that the ex-guardsmen were due for release renewed debate over the case in the United States and El Salvador. Prosecutors here tried and failed to keep the men in prison via appeals that lasted for three months.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 25, 1992
SAN SALVADOR, El Salvador -- A confidential list o Salvadoran officers to be purged from their military posts next month for reasons including human rights violations includes the defense minister, his deputy minister and more than 110 officers, according to people familiar with the list.The purge orders, seen as one of the most serious tests of civilian authority over the armed forces, have raised tensions to a new level here as a series of important deadlines, established in the peace accord reached last year, slip by."
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 22, 1998
SAN SALVADOR, El Salvador -- Sparking new controversy in one of the most publicized cases in the prolonged, costly U.S. involvement in Central America's civil wars, Salvadoran authorities yesterday authorized the parole of three of the five soldiers convicted of killing four American religious women in 1980.Reports that the ex-guardsmen were due for release renewed debate over the case in the United States and El Salvador. Prosecutors here tried and failed to keep the men in prison via appeals that lasted for three months.
SPORTS
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | November 16, 1997
The U.S. national team's motivation to play well against El Salvador this afternoon in certainly cold, likely wet and snowy Foxboro, Mass., must come from within.Ego and pride -- and perhaps coach Steve Sampson's job -- will be on the line for the Americans in a national TV game before 50,000-plus fans, but nothing more important, such as clinching a World Cup berth. Did that last Sunday.Last week's U.S. star, reconstituted D.C. United striker Roy Wegerle, summed up things this way: "We want to finish out this campaign with a victory and try to tie Mexico [for first place]
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