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May 3, 2003
Hard time calls for hard rock - at least that's the view of Metallica, who performed a free hour-long concert at California's San Quentin State Prison. The heavy-metal band agreed to perform Thursday for about 800 inmates after spending 18 hours at the prison Wednesday filming the video for the title track to its new album, St. Anger. A spokesman for Metallica's record company, Elektra Records, said prisoners and guards appeared as extras in the video, which was shot inside a cell block and in the outside yard during a lunch break.
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By JONATHAN PITTS and JONATHAN PITTS,SUN REPORTER | August 3, 2006
At the height of the Vietnam War, in his song, "The Fightin' Side of Me," a cantankerous ex-con named Merle Haggard told hippie protesters, "If you don't love [America], leave it; let this song that I'm singin' be a warning." Thirty-six years later, the whiskey-voiced star spends much of his hard-earned credibility questioning the war in Iraq and defending the Dixie Chicks, the country-music trio whose radio airplay went south three years ago after they slammed President Bush on foreign soil.
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NEWS
By John M. Glionna and John M. Glionna,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 5, 2001
SAN QUENTIN, Calif. - Each time the heavy gates clank shut behind him, prison guard Robert Trono enters a violent realm of men with nothing left to lose. The 39-year-old sergeant works in a cramped concrete cellblock that houses 85 criminals awaiting execution. It is a place where riot gear, stab-proof vests, biohazard body suits and fear are standard issue. Trono helps oversee inmates known as the Grade-B condemned, the most dangerous of San Quentin State Prison's 580 death row prisoners.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 13, 2005
SAN QUENTIN, CALIF. -- Stanley "Tookie" Williams, whose self-described evolution from gang thug to anti-violence crusader won him an international following and nominations for a Nobel Peace Prize, was set to die by lethal injection early today, hours after Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger refused to spare his life. Later in the day, the U.S. Supreme Court refused to intervene in the case. Despite persistent pleas for mercy from around the globe, the governor said Williams was unworthy of clemency because he had not admitted shooting to death four people during two robberies 26 years ago. Barring a last-minute court stay, the co-founder of the infamous Crips street gang - who insisted he was innocent - was expected to become the 12th man executed by the state of California since voters reinstated capital punishment in 1978.
FEATURES
By JONATHAN PITTS and JONATHAN PITTS,SUN REPORTER | August 3, 2006
At the height of the Vietnam War, in his song, "The Fightin' Side of Me," a cantankerous ex-con named Merle Haggard told hippie protesters, "If you don't love [America], leave it; let this song that I'm singin' be a warning." Thirty-six years later, the whiskey-voiced star spends much of his hard-earned credibility questioning the war in Iraq and defending the Dixie Chicks, the country-music trio whose radio airplay went south three years ago after they slammed President Bush on foreign soil.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 13, 2005
SAN QUENTIN, CALIF. -- Stanley "Tookie" Williams, whose self-described evolution from gang thug to anti-violence crusader won him an international following and nominations for a Nobel Peace Prize, was set to die by lethal injection early today, hours after Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger refused to spare his life. Later in the day, the U.S. Supreme Court refused to intervene in the case. Despite persistent pleas for mercy from around the globe, the governor said Williams was unworthy of clemency because he had not admitted shooting to death four people during two robberies 26 years ago. Barring a last-minute court stay, the co-founder of the infamous Crips street gang - who insisted he was innocent - was expected to become the 12th man executed by the state of California since voters reinstated capital punishment in 1978.
NEWS
By Jane Meredith Adams and Jane Meredith Adams,Contributing Writer | April 19, 1992
SAN QUENTIN VILLAGE, Calif. -- Daily life has a way of obscuring the obvious. People living next to the freeway don't hear the sound of the cars; up in the mountains, they forget to look at the view. And here, next to a 440-acre prison that is home to California's death row, neighbors say they usually don't think about what goes on inside the gate.But now the state is approaching its first execution in 25 years. The green gas chamber at the San Quentin California state prison has been cleaned and checked.
NEWS
By Edward Bunker and Edward Bunker,Special to The Sun | February 19, 1995
David Von Drehle moves the rock and shows us capital punishment. His lens is focused on Florida, beginning with a moment by moment account of John Spenkel-nick's execution, from the futile last appeals and clemency hearing while prison personnel simultaneously rehearsed the drill of death on each other. Still, he sizzled, a poor schnook who killed a loathsome criminal and bully, and didn't have enough sense to take a plea bargain. His crime partner was acquitted but later admitted participation.
NEWS
By EARL OFARI HUTCHINSON | December 4, 2005
In a candid and revealing moment, Stanley "Tookie" Williams told a visitor at San Quentin State Prison in California that he helped found the notorious Crips street gang because he wanted to smash everyone, make a rep and get respect and dignity, and that he wanted his name to be known everywhere. He got his wish in more ways than he ever dreamed of. The demons that drove Mr. Williams in his reckless push for identity and prominence also drove him to become the nation's best-known condemned prisoner.
FEATURES
By Winifred Walsh and Winifred Walsh,Contributing Writer | May 7, 1992
The San Quentin Drama Workshop, sponsored by The Theater Collective, is staging two absorbing one-act plays, "Eh, Joe" by Samuel Beckett and "Shepherd's Song" by Rick Cluchey, at St. John's Methodist Church through May 16.The workshop, an educational, non-profit group, was formed in 1957 when Cluchey was serving a life sentence for robbery and kidnapping. He was released on parole after serving 12 years.While still in San Quentin, the budding actor/director/writer staged three of Samuel Beckett's plays.
NEWS
By EARL OFARI HUTCHINSON | December 4, 2005
In a candid and revealing moment, Stanley "Tookie" Williams told a visitor at San Quentin State Prison in California that he helped found the notorious Crips street gang because he wanted to smash everyone, make a rep and get respect and dignity, and that he wanted his name to be known everywhere. He got his wish in more ways than he ever dreamed of. The demons that drove Mr. Williams in his reckless push for identity and prominence also drove him to become the nation's best-known condemned prisoner.
FEATURES
May 3, 2003
Hard time calls for hard rock - at least that's the view of Metallica, who performed a free hour-long concert at California's San Quentin State Prison. The heavy-metal band agreed to perform Thursday for about 800 inmates after spending 18 hours at the prison Wednesday filming the video for the title track to its new album, St. Anger. A spokesman for Metallica's record company, Elektra Records, said prisoners and guards appeared as extras in the video, which was shot inside a cell block and in the outside yard during a lunch break.
NEWS
By John M. Glionna and John M. Glionna,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 5, 2001
SAN QUENTIN, Calif. - Each time the heavy gates clank shut behind him, prison guard Robert Trono enters a violent realm of men with nothing left to lose. The 39-year-old sergeant works in a cramped concrete cellblock that houses 85 criminals awaiting execution. It is a place where riot gear, stab-proof vests, biohazard body suits and fear are standard issue. Trono helps oversee inmates known as the Grade-B condemned, the most dangerous of San Quentin State Prison's 580 death row prisoners.
NEWS
By Edward Bunker and Edward Bunker,Special to The Sun | February 19, 1995
David Von Drehle moves the rock and shows us capital punishment. His lens is focused on Florida, beginning with a moment by moment account of John Spenkel-nick's execution, from the futile last appeals and clemency hearing while prison personnel simultaneously rehearsed the drill of death on each other. Still, he sizzled, a poor schnook who killed a loathsome criminal and bully, and didn't have enough sense to take a plea bargain. His crime partner was acquitted but later admitted participation.
FEATURES
By Winifred Walsh and Winifred Walsh,Contributing Writer | May 7, 1992
The San Quentin Drama Workshop, sponsored by The Theater Collective, is staging two absorbing one-act plays, "Eh, Joe" by Samuel Beckett and "Shepherd's Song" by Rick Cluchey, at St. John's Methodist Church through May 16.The workshop, an educational, non-profit group, was formed in 1957 when Cluchey was serving a life sentence for robbery and kidnapping. He was released on parole after serving 12 years.While still in San Quentin, the budding actor/director/writer staged three of Samuel Beckett's plays.
NEWS
By Gregg Zoroya and Gregg Zoroya,Orange County Register | April 22, 1992
SAN QUENTIN, Calif. -- It is the dead of night, minutes before 3 a.m., when prison officials suddenly roust 18 media witnesses from their lethargy of waiting hours for distant high courts to rule on Robert Alton Harris' fate.The lights of Richmond-San Rafael Bridge dance on the waters of San Francisco Bay -- on which San Quentin State Prison stands -- as the seven women and 11 men are driven about 200 yards to the gas chamber witness room.A desperate urgency is in the air. Prison officials are racing against the odds of another stay of execution.
NEWS
By Gregg Zoroya and Gregg Zoroya,Orange County Register | April 22, 1992
SAN QUENTIN, Calif. -- It is the dead of night, minutes before 3 a.m., when prison officials suddenly roust 18 media witnesses from their lethargy of waiting hours for distant high courts to rule on Robert Alton Harris' fate.The lights of Richmond-San Rafael Bridge dance on the waters of San Francisco Bay -- on which San Quentin State Prison stands -- as the seven women and 11 men are driven about 200 yards to the gas chamber witness room.A desperate urgency is in the air. Prison officials are racing against the odds of another stay of execution.
NEWS
July 24, 1992
SANDY Grady is a columnist for the wildly liberal Philadelphia Daily News. As such, he qualifies for reprinting in the similarly radical Evening Sun. Because Grady is fairly crafty -- a sort of Mary McGooGoo with a mallet -- and because I believe in keeping an eye on the enemy, I read his July 14 column on the Democratic National Convention.At first I thought the Age of Miracles had arrived, that this heavy-handed, hard-lefty had actually written something with which I could agree:"It's the Valium-like peace inside the Garden that makes you wonder what happened to the old snarling, biting Democrats . . . This seamless, antiseptic love-in is exactly what Governor Clinton and party chairman Ron Brown wanted . . . You may call the federal pen at San Quentin "unified," too, but it's not exactly democratic with a lower-case "d."
NEWS
By Jane Meredith Adams and Jane Meredith Adams,Contributing Writer | April 19, 1992
SAN QUENTIN VILLAGE, Calif. -- Daily life has a way of obscuring the obvious. People living next to the freeway don't hear the sound of the cars; up in the mountains, they forget to look at the view. And here, next to a 440-acre prison that is home to California's death row, neighbors say they usually don't think about what goes on inside the gate.But now the state is approaching its first execution in 25 years. The green gas chamber at the San Quentin California state prison has been cleaned and checked.
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