Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSan Mateo
IN THE NEWS

San Mateo

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Jane Meredith Adams and Jane Meredith Adams,Contributing Writer | March 23, 1992
SAN MATEO, Calif. -- Politicians sometimes wonder what it takes to rouse the public. San Mateo County Supervisor Tom Nolan found out: Try to control the reproductive organs of their pets.More than a year ago, Mr. Nolan proposed an ordinance requiring that all cats and dogs older than six months be spayed or neutered. He was outraged, he said, by the 10,000 unwanted cats and dogs that are put to death each year by the county humane society.Nothing prepared him for the furor that followed.Hearings in this county just south of San Francisco drew 400 agitated residents at a time.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 29, 2014
I want to thank journalist Dan Rodricks for his informative column about pit bulls ( "Two years after Maryland court ruling, pit bulls on attack," April 26). It helps me understand more about the pit bull lover uproar and their jargon about it being "the owner, not the breed. " However, nothing will ever help me understand why the pit bull lover groups refuse to look at the facts. A pit bull mauling and/or fatality occurs on a daily basis in our nation, and the data is right there if they desire to look at it. These pit bull fanatics are truly an ignorant group that is putting all of us in danger as a result.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder | July 12, 1991
SAN MATEO, Calif. -- She lay trapped inside a dark and dusty chimney with her friend for nearly an hour. Firefighters found the only way to free them was to demolish the chimney.But when all was said and done, Bonnie Earle, 10, had one question: If two little girls couldn't make it from the top of the chimney to the living room fireplace, how could Santa Claus?Firefighters and family members said it was that kind of reasoning that led Bonnie and Nicole Jones, 6, to the chimney Tuesday afternoon after Bonnie lost the keys to her grandparents' San Mateo home.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | November 25, 2013
SolarCity will unveil three solar installations in Queen Anne's County this week that the company said are collectively the largest in the state not owned by a utility. The installations include more than 14,000 solar panels and are capable of generating more than 3 megawatts of electricity, SolarCity said. That's enough to power about 300 Maryland homes for a year, according to the Solar Energy Industries Association. Two solar farms were built for the town of Centreville and the third was built for the county, the San Mateo, Calif.- based company said.
NEWS
By Thomas Sowell | April 21, 2005
WHERE CAN YOU make $2,000 a day, with no real effort? In San Mateo County, Calif. Before you start packing your bags to head there, you should know that the average homeowner in San Mateo County saw the value of his or her property increase by $2,000 a day over the past month. The median price of a single-family home in the county reached $896,000. But if you don't own a home in San Mateo County, you don't get the two grand a day. Someone from outside California might think that people must be building a lot of new mansions in San Mateo County.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2012
Josie Mehta, a retired registered nurse who had worked at the Baltimore Veterans Affairs Medical Center, died Sept. 1 of cancer at her Nottingham home. She was 61. The daughter of an insurance man and a homemaker, Josie Dela Cruz was born and raised in Virac, the Philippines, where she graduated from high school. After earning her nursing degree in 1972 from the University of Santo Thomas in the Philippines, she came to Baltimore the next year when she took a nursing job at the old Church Home Hospital.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | November 25, 2013
SolarCity will unveil three solar installations in Queen Anne's County this week that the company said are collectively the largest in the state not owned by a utility. The installations include more than 14,000 solar panels and are capable of generating more than 3 megawatts of electricity, SolarCity said. That's enough to power about 300 Maryland homes for a year, according to the Solar Energy Industries Association. Two solar farms were built for the town of Centreville and the third was built for the county, the San Mateo, Calif.- based company said.
BUSINESS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2011
A California-based solar energy company announced Monday it is expanding to Maryland, where it plans to offer homeowners and businesses the option to lease rather than buy photovoltaic systems. SolarCity, headquartered in San Mateo, has acquired Clean Currents Solar, the solar installation division of Clean Currents, an independent green energy company based in Rockville that now markets solar and wind power in the mid-Atlantic region. Claiming more than 10,000 customers in Arizona, California, Colorado, Oregon and Texas, SolarCity said it plans to begin offering zero-down, 20-year solar leases in Maryland and Washington, D.C., in mid-February.
FEATURES
By Gina Spadafori and Gina Spadafori,McClatchy News Service | July 25, 1992
Less than two years ago, the Peninsula Humane Society in California's San Mateo County came up with a simple idea: Curtail the breeding of animals in order to stop the killing of animals.The approach was revolutionary. Instead of accepting the killing of surplus dogs and cats as "normal," the society proposed requiring every animal be spayed or neutered, unless the owners purchased breeding permits. It was a landmark attempt to shift responsibility for animal overpopulation onto those who cause the problem: People who allow their animals to produce litters, no matter what the reason.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 19, 2004
SAN JOSE, Calif. - It took Anne LeClair a split second to realize that there was opportunity in the murder trial of Scott Peterson, who is accused of killing his wife, Laci, and their unborn son. As soon as her county was identified as one of a handful of possible trial locations, LeClair, a tourism official, was collecting business cards and putting together promotional materials. "I FedExed the package the next day to the presiding judge," said LeClair, president and chief executive of the San Mateo County Convention and Visitors Bureau.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2012
Josie Mehta, a retired registered nurse who had worked at the Baltimore Veterans Affairs Medical Center, died Sept. 1 of cancer at her Nottingham home. She was 61. The daughter of an insurance man and a homemaker, Josie Dela Cruz was born and raised in Virac, the Philippines, where she graduated from high school. After earning her nursing degree in 1972 from the University of Santo Thomas in the Philippines, she came to Baltimore the next year when she took a nursing job at the old Church Home Hospital.
BUSINESS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2011
A California-based solar energy company announced Monday it is expanding to Maryland, where it plans to offer homeowners and businesses the option to lease rather than buy photovoltaic systems. SolarCity, headquartered in San Mateo, has acquired Clean Currents Solar, the solar installation division of Clean Currents, an independent green energy company based in Rockville that now markets solar and wind power in the mid-Atlantic region. Claiming more than 10,000 customers in Arizona, California, Colorado, Oregon and Texas, SolarCity said it plans to begin offering zero-down, 20-year solar leases in Maryland and Washington, D.C., in mid-February.
NEWS
By Thomas Sowell | April 21, 2005
WHERE CAN YOU make $2,000 a day, with no real effort? In San Mateo County, Calif. Before you start packing your bags to head there, you should know that the average homeowner in San Mateo County saw the value of his or her property increase by $2,000 a day over the past month. The median price of a single-family home in the county reached $896,000. But if you don't own a home in San Mateo County, you don't get the two grand a day. Someone from outside California might think that people must be building a lot of new mansions in San Mateo County.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 19, 2004
SAN JOSE, Calif. - It took Anne LeClair a split second to realize that there was opportunity in the murder trial of Scott Peterson, who is accused of killing his wife, Laci, and their unborn son. As soon as her county was identified as one of a handful of possible trial locations, LeClair, a tourism official, was collecting business cards and putting together promotional materials. "I FedExed the package the next day to the presiding judge," said LeClair, president and chief executive of the San Mateo County Convention and Visitors Bureau.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | November 24, 1996
SAN MATEO, Calif. -- It's beyond being a personal matter for Dolph Camilli, who was a major-league baseball standout during the Franklin D. Roosevelt administration, a time when the game presented its most competitive demands and players were devoid of bargaining rights. If they couldn't live with second-class citizenship and instances in which the club owners had all the authority, there was only one option: quitting.Camilli is one of 77 former players who have been ignored in the baseball pension plan, simply because they had the misfortune to play before the retirement system was established in 1947.
FEATURES
By Kathleen Donnelly and Kathleen Donnelly,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | November 24, 1994
In 1941, Dolores Kelsey Sorci was a housewife in Boise, Idaho, with three daughters and no job experience. Then the United States went to war, and within a year Ms. Sorci was a riveter servicing B-24s at Hill Air Base near Ogden, Utah.2 "No," she answers. "I never thought about it."Patricia Teeling Lapp was not easily intimidated either. But she did get lonely."Three days after I was married, I got my assignment," Ms. Lapp says, remembering her service with the Civil Aeronautics Administration.
NEWS
April 29, 2014
I want to thank journalist Dan Rodricks for his informative column about pit bulls ( "Two years after Maryland court ruling, pit bulls on attack," April 26). It helps me understand more about the pit bull lover uproar and their jargon about it being "the owner, not the breed. " However, nothing will ever help me understand why the pit bull lover groups refuse to look at the facts. A pit bull mauling and/or fatality occurs on a daily basis in our nation, and the data is right there if they desire to look at it. These pit bull fanatics are truly an ignorant group that is putting all of us in danger as a result.
FEATURES
By Kathleen Donnelly and Kathleen Donnelly,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | November 24, 1994
In 1941, Dolores Kelsey Sorci was a housewife in Boise, Idaho, with three daughters and no job experience. Then the United States went to war, and within a year Ms. Sorci was a riveter servicing B-24s at Hill Air Base near Ogden, Utah.2 "No," she answers. "I never thought about it."Patricia Teeling Lapp was not easily intimidated either. But she did get lonely."Three days after I was married, I got my assignment," Ms. Lapp says, remembering her service with the Civil Aeronautics Administration.
BUSINESS
By PETER H. LEWIS | December 20, 1993
It's a familiar scenario. The manager dreads writing employee performance reviews, and not just because they take up time. Hoping to be thought of as a good person, the manager sidesteps uncomfortable criticism and ends up concocting a bland appraisal that lacks detail, substance or guidance for the employee.The employee, who recalls that a co-worker got sacked soon after receiving a positive job review, is demoralized despite being praised as a "team player" who "does a nice job."The annual job appraisal does not have to be such a perfunctory ritual.
FEATURES
By Niki Scott and Niki Scott,Universal Press Syndicate | November 14, 1993
It's time for readers of this column to have the very last word. This month, many of you addressed recent columns about how to fire an employee, disastrous friendships between bosses and employees, and the high cost of child care.About the proper time to fire an employee, a reader of the Star Democrat from Chestertown wrote: "I agree with you on all points except when you wrote, 'Pick your time carefully -- Friday afternoons often are best . . .' I think Friday afternoon, for any sort of discipline, including firing, is the wrong time."
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.