Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSan Francisco Symphony
IN THE NEWS

San Francisco Symphony

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Baltimore Sun staff | February 1, 2010
Though two Baltimore-based musical groups lost in the 52nd annual Grammy Awards Sunday, Marin Alsop, conductor for the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, did come away a winner. The BSO's recording of Leonard Bernstein's epic, controversial music-theater piece "Mass" was a nominee for Best Classical Album, a category won by the San Francisco Symphony. Alsop conducted Jennifer Higdon's Percussion Concerto on a London Philharmonic recording that was named Best Classical Contemporary Composition.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 21, 2011
Blond and boyishly handsome, Vasily Petrenko might be mistaken for a gymnast, or perhaps a player of his favorite sport, soccer. But when the 35-year-old Russian conductor steps onto a podium, there's no doubt about his true calling. In 2009, Petrenko made a striking debut with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra in an all-Russian program that included the most arresting Tchaikovsky and Shostakovich performances since Yuri Temirkanov stepped down as that ensemble's music director a few years earlier.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 7, 2002
Ives Charles Ives: An American Journey. Thomas Hampson, baritone; San Francisco Symphony and Chorus; Michael Tilson Thomas, conductor. (BMG 09026-63703) Charles Ives is to music what Robin Williams is (or was, before fatherhood tamed him) to comedy - unpredictable, unstructured, unafraid. Ives was not just far ahead of his own time almost a century ago, experimenting with non-traditional harmonies and forms long before the European atonalists got going. This American giant sounds as far ahead of our own time, too; his ferocious originality has lost none of its ability to astound.
FEATURES
By Baltimore Sun staff | February 1, 2010
Though two Baltimore-based musical groups lost in the 52nd annual Grammy Awards Sunday, Marin Alsop, conductor for the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, did come away a winner. The BSO's recording of Leonard Bernstein's epic, controversial music-theater piece "Mass" was a nominee for Best Classical Album, a category won by the San Francisco Symphony. Alsop conducted Jennifer Higdon's Percussion Concerto on a London Philharmonic recording that was named Best Classical Contemporary Composition.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | September 5, 2000
The music calendar for the Baltimore area is chock-full of goodies, as you will see in the annual arts guide in Thursday's paper. But a few attractions are missing. You won't find the world's great orchestras performing in Baltimore. They'll only visit Washington, as usual, and that's too bad. Baltimore concert-goers could benefit from convenient and regular exposure to, say, the London Symphony Orchestra, Dresden Staatskapelle and San Francisco Symphony. Not to mention the other BSO, the Boston Symphony Orchestra.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 21, 2011
Blond and boyishly handsome, Vasily Petrenko might be mistaken for a gymnast, or perhaps a player of his favorite sport, soccer. But when the 35-year-old Russian conductor steps onto a podium, there's no doubt about his true calling. In 2009, Petrenko made a striking debut with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra in an all-Russian program that included the most arresting Tchaikovsky and Shostakovich performances since Yuri Temirkanov stepped down as that ensemble's music director a few years earlier.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | April 24, 1994
Strauss, "Ein Heldenleben" and "Metamorphosen," performed by the San Francisco Symphony, Herbert Blomstedt conducting (London 436 596-2):There is more ceaseless duplication in the classical record industry than in almost any other business I can think of. Symphony orchestras spend fortunes making records for no other reason than to keep their names before the public -- it doesn't matter that they usually don't sell. This one shouldn't.Herbert Blomstedt, now in his next to last year as music director of the San Francisco Symphony, has refined and improved the fine orchestra he inherited more than 10 years ago from Edo de Waart.
NEWS
By Michael Pakenham | February 4, 1996
"The Symphony: A Listeners Guide," by Michael Steinberg (Oxford University Press, 678 pages, $35). Mr. Steinberg's collected program notes for the San Francisco Symphony, the New York Philharmonic and the Boston Symphony. Explorations and celebrations of mostly great music written with truly extraordinary clarity and gusto, jargon-free. Enduringly valuable to even the once-a-year concertgoer, and superb for the more frequent enthusiast.
NEWS
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 19, 1996
Aaron Jay Kernis, "Colored Field" (Concerto for English horn and orchestra), performed by Julie Ann Giacobassi and the San Francisco Symphony, Alastair Neale conducting, and "Still Movement With Hymn," performed by Pamela Frank, violin, Paul Neubauer, viola, Carter Brey, cello, and Christopher O'Riley, piano (Argo 448 174-2):"Colored Field," which was commissioned by the San Francisco Symphony for its English hornist, Julie Ann Giacobassi, is a beautiful and demanding work that lasts more than 40 minutes.
NEWS
June 24, 1998
Mutwali Sharawi, a leading cleric in the Muslim world who was minister of religious endowments under Egyptian President Anwar el Sadat, died June 17 in Cairo.Lucia Valentini Terrani, 51, the Italian mezzo-soprano who was a leading performer of Gioacchino Rossini's works, died June 11 in Seattle of leukemia.Ernst Brugger, 84, a former Swiss president who reached a European free trade deal for his country, died Sunday in Gossau, Switzerland.Louise M. Davies, 98, whose name graces San Francisco's symphony hall, died Monday in Portola Valley, Calif.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 7, 2002
Ives Charles Ives: An American Journey. Thomas Hampson, baritone; San Francisco Symphony and Chorus; Michael Tilson Thomas, conductor. (BMG 09026-63703) Charles Ives is to music what Robin Williams is (or was, before fatherhood tamed him) to comedy - unpredictable, unstructured, unafraid. Ives was not just far ahead of his own time almost a century ago, experimenting with non-traditional harmonies and forms long before the European atonalists got going. This American giant sounds as far ahead of our own time, too; his ferocious originality has lost none of its ability to astound.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | September 5, 2000
The music calendar for the Baltimore area is chock-full of goodies, as you will see in the annual arts guide in Thursday's paper. But a few attractions are missing. You won't find the world's great orchestras performing in Baltimore. They'll only visit Washington, as usual, and that's too bad. Baltimore concert-goers could benefit from convenient and regular exposure to, say, the London Symphony Orchestra, Dresden Staatskapelle and San Francisco Symphony. Not to mention the other BSO, the Boston Symphony Orchestra.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | April 24, 1994
Strauss, "Ein Heldenleben" and "Metamorphosen," performed by the San Francisco Symphony, Herbert Blomstedt conducting (London 436 596-2):There is more ceaseless duplication in the classical record industry than in almost any other business I can think of. Symphony orchestras spend fortunes making records for no other reason than to keep their names before the public -- it doesn't matter that they usually don't sell. This one shouldn't.Herbert Blomstedt, now in his next to last year as music director of the San Francisco Symphony, has refined and improved the fine orchestra he inherited more than 10 years ago from Edo de Waart.
NEWS
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,david.zurawik@baltsun.com | October 29, 2008
We are now officially only days away from the election of a lifetime, and Democratic presidential candidate Barack Obama comes to prime time tonight with a half-hour paid political announcement that is expected to reach such a large audience that Fox was willing to rearrange its World Series schedule to open up some airtime for the candidate. (8 p.m., WBAL-Channel 11, WJZ-Channel 13, WBFF-Channel 45 and cable channel BET) GIVE ME MORE POLITICS The Biography Channel, meanwhile, weighs in tonight with profiles of the two presidential candidates: John McCain: American Maverick and Barack Obama.
NEWS
September 10, 2006
It looks like the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra has everything in place to capitalize on its strengths and enhance its community appeal. The BSO has a gregarious, fiscally savvy board chairman at its helm. It has cleared its debt (albeit by raiding its endowment). The symphony's new music director brings pizazz and proven ability to the podium. And, with last week's hiring of an accomplished, innovative chief executive officer, the BSO, as an organization and institution, should be ready to deliver.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.