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By Peter Kornbluh | August 30, 1998
In the late summer of 1984, the CIA faced what secret documents called the "potential for disaster." Congress was debating a full cutoff of funding for the Reagan administration's covert Contra war in Nicaragua. At that delicate political moment, legal proceedings in a major drug bust in San Francisco threatened to publicly link CIA-Contra operations with cocaine trafficking.A CIA official summed up the Agency's concerns over publicity this way: "What would make better headlines?" The agent, identified only as Ms. Jones, told investigators that the CIA quietly intervened in the case because it could have had an "explosive" impact on the Agency's mission.
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NEWS
By Stephanie Salter | August 4, 1999
SAN FRANCISCO -- While the current national obsession with getting rich did not cause Mark Orrin Barton to murder his family and nine Atlanta strangers, psychologist Michael Mantell says it provided a perfect '90s backdrop for Barton's expression of an increasingly common psychotic rage. In the scores of explosive violence cases that Mr. Mantell has studied since 1984, there were always three out-of-proportion perceptions held by the murderer: "There is a sense that he is entitled, that he deserves more and that he should get it."
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NEWS
By Stephanie Salter | August 4, 1999
SAN FRANCISCO -- While the current national obsession with getting rich did not cause Mark Orrin Barton to murder his family and nine Atlanta strangers, psychologist Michael Mantell says it provided a perfect '90s backdrop for Barton's expression of an increasingly common psychotic rage. In the scores of explosive violence cases that Mr. Mantell has studied since 1984, there were always three out-of-proportion perceptions held by the murderer: "There is a sense that he is entitled, that he deserves more and that he should get it."
NEWS
By Douglas MacKinnon | March 2, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Republicans, Democrats, the news media and most Americans can only sit back and scratch their heads in wonder. President Clinton becomes only the second president in U.S. history to be impeached by the House and tried in the Senate, and his poll numbers go higher. Over the past year, pundits and politicians have labored to explain the discrepancy between Mr. Clinton's high approval ratings and what House Minority Leader Richard Gephardt has called his "reprehensible" behavior.
NEWS
By Douglas MacKinnon | March 2, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Republicans, Democrats, the news media and most Americans can only sit back and scratch their heads in wonder. President Clinton becomes only the second president in U.S. history to be impeached by the House and tried in the Senate, and his poll numbers go higher. Over the past year, pundits and politicians have labored to explain the discrepancy between Mr. Clinton's high approval ratings and what House Minority Leader Richard Gephardt has called his "reprehensible" behavior.
NEWS
By Craig Marine | March 17, 1995
San Francisco -- TUPAC SHAKUR is a punk. Worse than that, he's a punk masquerading as a role model.In the April issue of Vibe magazine, the rapper-turned-actor-turned-shooter speaks from jail on Rikers Island and does his best to spread enough manure to fertilize the Nebraska cornfields.Tupac Shakur, 23, who was sentenced to 4 1/2 years in prison last month on a sex-abuse charge, would have us believe that he's been freed from his "addiction" to pot-smoking, club-hopping and his "Thug Life" persona.
NEWS
By Rob Morse | July 26, 1999
SAN FRANCISCO -- Jerry Springer for Senate? Why not? Ohio elected a senator who was farther out in space than Springer.Think how C-SPAN's ratings would soar.Think how entertaining impeachment trials could be, especially if senators could be given lighter chairs, ones they could throw.Think how enlightened the Senate could become on issues such as male lesbians, cross-dressing nudists and bosses who cheat on their wives with young employees while conducting foreign affairs on the phone.Oh, that's right.
NEWS
October 10, 1999
Here is an excerpt of an editorial from the San Francisco Examiner, which was published Thursday.CONSIDER THIS the Rubicon. We all know fruits and vegetables are life-savers, yet pizza and doughnuts still make up the main food groups in too many of our diets.For Baby Boomers especially, let the new results of a 14-year Harvard study be the turning point to a healthy diet. Otherwise, the risk of stroke and other diseases is all the greater.The study of 76,000 female registered nurses over a 14-year period and 39,000 male doctors and other medical workers over eight years found that the risk of stroke was cut by nearly a third among those who consumed a diet rich in fruits and vegetables.
NEWS
November 21, 1999
This is an edited excerpt of a San Francisco Examiner editorial, which was published Tuesday.THE BANKING industry is proving to be its own worst enemy in the aftermath of a losing election campaign over excessive automated teller machine fees.Earlier this month, San Francisco voters approved a measure that prohibits banks from charging non-customers a second fee for using their ATMs. Instead of being gracious losers, the banks obtained a temporary injunction.The banks have a public relations disaster on their hands.
NEWS
October 4, 1999
Here is an excerpt of an editorial from the San Francisco Examiner, which was published Friday.STRUGGLING MATH students warned us the metric system would never fly in this country, and it looks like they were right.It turns out that the recent disintegration of the Mars Climate Orbiter is being blamed on a mix-up about measurements.One team working on the spacecraft used familiar-as-old-shoes feet and inches. The other team's calculations were based on the metric system.The never-ending competition between meters and feet added up to a $125 million mistake.
NEWS
By Peter Kornbluh | August 30, 1998
In the late summer of 1984, the CIA faced what secret documents called the "potential for disaster." Congress was debating a full cutoff of funding for the Reagan administration's covert Contra war in Nicaragua. At that delicate political moment, legal proceedings in a major drug bust in San Francisco threatened to publicly link CIA-Contra operations with cocaine trafficking.A CIA official summed up the Agency's concerns over publicity this way: "What would make better headlines?" The agent, identified only as Ms. Jones, told investigators that the CIA quietly intervened in the case because it could have had an "explosive" impact on the Agency's mission.
FEATURES
June 29, 1998
Beginning today, "Dilbert" has a new neighbor on The Sun's comics pages -- "Non Sequitur" by Wiley (a.k.a. Wiley Miller). It replaces "Tommy," which was discontinued by its syndicate. The new strip takes simple ideas and views them with an off-kilter sensibility.Wiley, who lives in Iowa, developed that perspective during 15 years in editorial cartooning for such publications as Playboy, the Saturday Evening Post and the San Francisco Examiner. He quit satirizing the political world when the competition got too tough: The politicians, he found, had become their own comics.
BUSINESS
By NICK MADIGAN and NICK MADIGAN,SUN REPORTER | January 13, 2006
Frank J. Keegan, a former editor of the Connecticut Post, has been hired as the editor of the Baltimore Examiner, set to debut in the spring as a free daily newspaper. Keegan, who could not be reached for comment, was fired from his position at the Post, which is published in Bridgeport, Conn., in mid-April after working there about three years, according to an article in Connecticut's Fairfield County Weekly. He began working at his new job in Baltimore this week, Jim Monaghan, a spokesman for Denver-based Clarity Media Group, which owns the Examiner, confirmed yesterday.
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