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By Peter Kornbluh | August 30, 1998
In the late summer of 1984, the CIA faced what secret documents called the "potential for disaster." Congress was debating a full cutoff of funding for the Reagan administration's covert Contra war in Nicaragua. At that delicate political moment, legal proceedings in a major drug bust in San Francisco threatened to publicly link CIA-Contra operations with cocaine trafficking.A CIA official summed up the Agency's concerns over publicity this way: "What would make better headlines?" The agent, identified only as Ms. Jones, told investigators that the CIA quietly intervened in the case because it could have had an "explosive" impact on the Agency's mission.
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NEWS
By Stephanie Salter | August 4, 1999
SAN FRANCISCO -- While the current national obsession with getting rich did not cause Mark Orrin Barton to murder his family and nine Atlanta strangers, psychologist Michael Mantell says it provided a perfect '90s backdrop for Barton's expression of an increasingly common psychotic rage. In the scores of explosive violence cases that Mr. Mantell has studied since 1984, there were always three out-of-proportion perceptions held by the murderer: "There is a sense that he is entitled, that he deserves more and that he should get it."
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NEWS
By Stephanie Salter | August 4, 1999
SAN FRANCISCO -- While the current national obsession with getting rich did not cause Mark Orrin Barton to murder his family and nine Atlanta strangers, psychologist Michael Mantell says it provided a perfect '90s backdrop for Barton's expression of an increasingly common psychotic rage. In the scores of explosive violence cases that Mr. Mantell has studied since 1984, there were always three out-of-proportion perceptions held by the murderer: "There is a sense that he is entitled, that he deserves more and that he should get it."
NEWS
By Douglas MacKinnon | March 2, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Republicans, Democrats, the news media and most Americans can only sit back and scratch their heads in wonder. President Clinton becomes only the second president in U.S. history to be impeached by the House and tried in the Senate, and his poll numbers go higher. Over the past year, pundits and politicians have labored to explain the discrepancy between Mr. Clinton's high approval ratings and what House Minority Leader Richard Gephardt has called his "reprehensible" behavior.
NEWS
By Douglas MacKinnon | March 2, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Republicans, Democrats, the news media and most Americans can only sit back and scratch their heads in wonder. President Clinton becomes only the second president in U.S. history to be impeached by the House and tried in the Senate, and his poll numbers go higher. Over the past year, pundits and politicians have labored to explain the discrepancy between Mr. Clinton's high approval ratings and what House Minority Leader Richard Gephardt has called his "reprehensible" behavior.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | June 26, 1993
Just what prime-time TV needs: another newsmagazine, another bad TV newsmagazine. This one is called "Front Page" and it's from Fox Broadcasting.But wait. It gets worse.Behind the cameras are some of the biggest washouts in TV journalism, such as Van Gordon Sauter, the former president of CBS News who set a record for doing more damage in less time to a news operation than anyone this side of Michael Gartner.In front of the cameras, appearing weekly in the role of intrepid reporters, you have the likes of Ron Reagan.
NEWS
By Craig Marine | March 17, 1995
San Francisco -- TUPAC SHAKUR is a punk. Worse than that, he's a punk masquerading as a role model.In the April issue of Vibe magazine, the rapper-turned-actor-turned-shooter speaks from jail on Rikers Island and does his best to spread enough manure to fertilize the Nebraska cornfields.Tupac Shakur, 23, who was sentenced to 4 1/2 years in prison last month on a sex-abuse charge, would have us believe that he's been freed from his "addiction" to pot-smoking, club-hopping and his "Thug Life" persona.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Staff Writer | October 12, 1992
OAKLAND, Calif. -- It comes down to Dave Stewart again, and he probably wouldn't have it any other way. He will face David Cone today in Game 5 of what has become a sudden-death series for the Oakland Athletics.Stewart is taking his responsibility seriously. He kept the clubhouse doors closed after the game and gave the club an impromptu pep talk after the A's came from five runs ahead to drop a 7-6 decision to the Toronto Blue Jays yesterday at the Oakland Coliseum.The A's are a veteran team that has been in the playoffs four times in the last five years.
NEWS
By Rob Morse | July 26, 1999
SAN FRANCISCO -- Jerry Springer for Senate? Why not? Ohio elected a senator who was farther out in space than Springer.Think how C-SPAN's ratings would soar.Think how entertaining impeachment trials could be, especially if senators could be given lighter chairs, ones they could throw.Think how enlightened the Senate could become on issues such as male lesbians, cross-dressing nudists and bosses who cheat on their wives with young employees while conducting foreign affairs on the phone.Oh, that's right.
NEWS
By Stan Sinberg | May 16, 1996
MILL VALLEY, Calif. -- Between now and Election Day, politicians will fall over themselves in trying to convince us they are tougher on crime than their opponents.Of course, no matter who gets elected, it won't have a radical impact on the crime rate. This is good news because -- well, frankly, we need crime.Imagine for a moment that tomorrow noon, all crime disappears. No more burglaries, robberies, larcenies. Within days, entire industries would go belly-up: police departments, detective agencies, security guards, gun manufacturers, locksmiths, self-defense teachers, sociologists, alarm makers, etc.Why, the construction business alone would go into a major tailspin if it wasn't engaged in building prisons.
NEWS
By Peter Kornbluh | August 30, 1998
In the late summer of 1984, the CIA faced what secret documents called the "potential for disaster." Congress was debating a full cutoff of funding for the Reagan administration's covert Contra war in Nicaragua. At that delicate political moment, legal proceedings in a major drug bust in San Francisco threatened to publicly link CIA-Contra operations with cocaine trafficking.A CIA official summed up the Agency's concerns over publicity this way: "What would make better headlines?" The agent, identified only as Ms. Jones, told investigators that the CIA quietly intervened in the case because it could have had an "explosive" impact on the Agency's mission.
NEWS
October 10, 1999
Here is an excerpt of an editorial from the San Francisco Examiner, which was published Thursday.CONSIDER THIS the Rubicon. We all know fruits and vegetables are life-savers, yet pizza and doughnuts still make up the main food groups in too many of our diets.For Baby Boomers especially, let the new results of a 14-year Harvard study be the turning point to a healthy diet. Otherwise, the risk of stroke and other diseases is all the greater.The study of 76,000 female registered nurses over a 14-year period and 39,000 male doctors and other medical workers over eight years found that the risk of stroke was cut by nearly a third among those who consumed a diet rich in fruits and vegetables.
NEWS
November 21, 1999
This is an edited excerpt of a San Francisco Examiner editorial, which was published Tuesday.THE BANKING industry is proving to be its own worst enemy in the aftermath of a losing election campaign over excessive automated teller machine fees.Earlier this month, San Francisco voters approved a measure that prohibits banks from charging non-customers a second fee for using their ATMs. Instead of being gracious losers, the banks obtained a temporary injunction.The banks have a public relations disaster on their hands.
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