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By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2010
To prepare for the Mike Kuchar Showcase on Artscape's opening night, I bought Jennifer M. Kroot's "It Came from Kuchar," an elating and revealing docu-biography of underground filmmaker Mike Kuchar and his fellow auteur, brother George. (It's now out on DVD: go to kucharfilm.com.) I was never a fan of New York's proudly amateurish, campy and poetic "underground cinema" scene, not even when I was working for a small film magazine in the basement of the Bleecker Street Cinema. But Kroot's film opened my mind to their odd charms.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2010
"I had been in the mire of nuts and bolts, working with lights, synthetic furs, outrageous materials," says artist Ryan Hackett. "I needed quiet. " Out of that quiet, the 34-year-old Prince George's County native created the works that earned him the 2010 Janet & Walter Sondheim Artscape Prize, a $25,000 annual juried competition for visual artists from the Mid-Atlantic region. Last year, Hackett was named a Sondheim finalist for his striking collection of nature-themed installations — a fake fur-covered bench vibrating from a concealed subwoofer that imitated the heartbeat of a hibernating polar bear; a synthetic skull of a white Siberian tiger with headphones that allowed people to hear the animal's digitally transformed vocalizing; small shells attached to the wall, emitting a chorus of cicada sounds.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2010
"I had been in the mire of nuts and bolts, working with lights, synthetic furs, outrageous materials," says artist Ryan Hackett. "I needed quiet. " Out of that quiet, the 34-year-old Prince George's County native created the works that earned him the 2010 Janet & Walter Sondheim Artscape Prize, a $25,000 annual juried competition for visual artists from the Mid-Atlantic region. Last year, Hackett was named a Sondheim finalist for his striking collection of nature-themed installations — a fake fur-covered bench vibrating from a concealed subwoofer that imitated the heartbeat of a hibernating polar bear; a synthetic skull of a white Siberian tiger with headphones that allowed people to hear the animal's digitally transformed vocalizing; small shells attached to the wall, emitting a chorus of cicada sounds.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2010
To prepare for the Mike Kuchar Showcase on Artscape's opening night, I bought Jennifer M. Kroot's "It Came from Kuchar," an elating and revealing docu-biography of underground filmmaker Mike Kuchar and his fellow auteur, brother George. (It's now out on DVD: go to kucharfilm.com.) I was never a fan of New York's proudly amateurish, campy and poetic "underground cinema" scene, not even when I was working for a small film magazine in the basement of the Bleecker Street Cinema. But Kroot's film opened my mind to their odd charms.
FEATURES
By Meg Sullivan and Meg Sullivan,Los Angeles Daily News | June 28, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- An installation by a San Francisco artist is the toast of South Coast Plaza in Costa Mesa -- literally.In fact, the artworks on view at a mall gallery of the Laguna Art Museum feature thousands of slices of toast.The artist, Dawn Fryling, estimates that one piece, a towering mound called "Pile o' Toast," consists of about 3,000 pieces of lightly browned bread.Another sculpture, "Kilpatrick Unit," is comparatively small, with about 1,000 toasted pieces of bread from Kilpatrick's Bakery, a San Francisco-based chain.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | February 17, 2003
Mercedes Linton Shriver, an ardent environmentalist and an artist whose designer silk wraps are sold worldwide, died Wednesday of internal injuries after a fall down a cliff while hiking one of her favorite trails near her home in Saint-Barthelemy. She was 41 and had lived on the small Caribbean island in the French West Indies for about five years. Born in Baltimore and known as Merc, Ms. Shriver was a graduate of Maryvale Preparatory School and studied art later at a variety of places, including the Maryland Institute College of Art, the San Francisco Art Institute and the Telluride AhHa School.
NEWS
By From Staff Reports | March 19, 1994
Four universities in Maryland have some of the nation's best graduate programs in public health, medicine, law, engineering and art, according to a national survey.The Johns Hopkins University medical school ranked No. 2 among research-oriented programs, as it has for several years, behind Harvard University, according to the survey of academic officials in this week's U.S. News and World Report.In specialties, the Hopkins medical school ranked No. 1 in drug and alcohol abuse and in geriatrics, and No. 2 in four areas -- AIDS, internal medicine, pediatrics and women's health.
ENTERTAINMENT
By GENA R. CHATTIN GENA R. CHATTIN | February 22, 2007
JERRY GARCIA'S OTHER ART Music fans know Jerry Garcia for the music he made with the Grateful Dead, but Garcia was also a painter. He attended the San Francisco Art Institute before joining the band that eventually became the Dead, and his works have been described as realist, as surrealist and as geometric abstraction. See for yourself when Image Makers Art and 100.7 The Bay bring Jerry Garcia: A Visual Journey to Baltimore this weekend. This traveling exhibition includes lithographs, etchings, silk-screens and five original watercolors by Garcia.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,Sun reporter | February 25, 2007
A long, strange trip it's been from hippie Haight Street to a White Marsh Hilton, but more than a decade after his death, Jerry Garcia's legacy keeps on keeping on - and commanding $70,000 for a signed watercolor. So perhaps it's fitting that a touring show "featuring one of the largest collections ... ever assembled for public display" of the Grateful Dead bandleader's artwork made its local stop yesterday at a business hotel tucked between Corporate Drive and Mercantile Road. A musical icon of the 1960s counterculture movement who commanded a massive, multigenerational following until his death in 1995, Garcia cultivated a folksy, anti-establishment, papa-bear-on-pot image.
NEWS
March 21, 2005
Sheldon H. White, 76, whose studies of how children learn influenced the government's education policy and children's television programming, died Thursday from heart failure at a Boston hospital. Dr. White, who had been a Harvard faculty member for four decades until his retirement in 2001, gained national prominence in the 1960s for his studies of how young children learn. His work was used to develop the federal Head Start program and the Children's Television Workshop. He worked with the workshop between 1968 and 1970, when that organization developed Sesame Street.
FEATURES
By Marissa Lowman and Marissa Lowman,SUN STAFF | July 10, 2003
Some artists experience nature. Others make it their own. Tonight, the Evergreen House Museum unveils an exhibit that features landscape artists Mary Woodall and Maggie Thomas, who share a love of the outdoors and of Baltimore and have a different way of looking at both. Woodall, a 27-year-old Baltimore native, is obsessed with the notion that the boundaries we put between ourselves and nature have closed our eyes to the beauty all around us. "The five minutes most people spend outside everyday doesn't click with them," she says.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Staff Writer | June 13, 1993
Shakespeare on Wheels, the University of Maryland Baltimore County's traveling theater, will launch its ninth summer season of free outdoor performances with "The Merry Wives of Windsor" at 7:30 p.m. July 2 and 3 on the Fine Arts Hillside of the UMBC campus at 5401 Wilkens Ave.The summer theater program mounts a multilevel portable stage atop a 40-foot flatbed tractor trailer. To date, the program has reached more than 125,000 people in the region. The outdoor theater will present 53 performances at 28 sites throughout Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia, West Virginia and Washington.
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