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By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2011
Shhh. Don't bother the furry one....  A koala takes an afternoon nap in a tree at the San Diego Zoo on Sept. 23.
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FEATURES
The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2011
The other day the San Diego Zoo released this picture of a Parma wallaby in the nursery being bottle fed by senior keeper Janet Hawes. This is one of four feedings the joey named Trinka receives each day. Trinka is an aboriginal word for daytime. The little one also gets out of the pouch for some daily play in a pen in the nursery. And keepers have started giving her sun time in a vacant yard near the wallaby exhibit. The idea is that these activates will help her socialization and prepare her to rejoin the other wallabies at the zoo. The joey has been cared for by keepers and vets since she was found out of her mother's pouch on July 5. She was dirty, cold and bruised, but alert and veterinarians were able to clean her up and start caring for her immediately.
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TRAVEL
By Chicago Tribune | August 10, 2008
America's Best Zoos: A Travel Guide for Fans and Families Intrepid Traveler, $15.95 It is an undisputed fact and yet it still seems surprising: Zoos in the United States attract more annual visitors than all spectator sports combined. Of course, some zoos are more famous than others, such as Busch Gardens Africa in Tampa, Fla., and the San Diego Zoo. But most zoos are not that celebrated and, although popular as the statistics attest, they are considered more a perfect choice for schoolchildren on a field trip and families on a Saturday afternoon rather than as a bona fide tourist attraction.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2010
An okapi, an African animal related to giraffes, died Saturday night after digestive problems, the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore announced Monday. Karen, who was 6 years old, stopped eating last week, said Mike McClure, the zoo's general curator. Okapi (pronounced oh-KAH-pee) have short reddish-brown coats and white stripes, and are usually found in the forests of the Democratic Republic of Congo. A necropsy to determine the cause of death will be performed, but officials believe she was having a "gut stasis" issue, McClure said.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2010
An okapi, an African animal related to giraffes, died Saturday night after digestive problems, the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore announced Monday. Karen, who was 6 years old, stopped eating last week, said Mike McClure, the zoo's general curator. Okapi (pronounced oh-KAH-pee) have short reddish-brown coats and white stripes, and are usually found in the forests of the Democratic Republic of Congo. A necropsy to determine the cause of death will be performed, but officials believe she was having a "gut stasis" issue, McClure said.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 29, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Hsing-Hsing, the National Zoo's giant panda who for more than a quarter-century served as diplomat, research subject and sweet-natured delight to millions, died yesterday morning. Zookeepers gave the panda a lethal injection after deciding that irreversible kidney disease had made his life too painful to endure. He was 28, an advanced age for a panda. Hsing-Hsing and his longtime female denmate, Ling-Ling, who died in 1992, were gifts to the United States from Mao Tse-tung in commemoration of President Richard M. Nixon's ice-breaking trip to China in 1972.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman and michelle.deal@baltsun.com | February 12, 2010
Put down the shovel. Pick up your suitcase. Enough with the snow - it's time for a winter escape. Here are 10 destinations that would make a perfect sun-filled vacation, even if it's only just a fantasy: 1. Bermuda Go by boat, go by plane - whatever it takes, just get there. The island of pink sands is ideal for beach lovers and golf fans. When you book a trip by April 26 and stay three nights, the fourth night is free at select hotels. The "Golf-Around Getaway" offers three nights and three rounds of golf starting at $599 per person.
NEWS
By Tony Perry and Tony Perry,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 2, 2004
SAN DIEGO - The only captive member of what might be the world's most endangered species of bird has died in Hawaii, according to zoo officials. The death of the male po'ouli at a Maui conservation center came less than three months after its capture. Only two other po'ouli are known to exist, both in Maui's dense rain forest. Bird specialists had hoped to capture one or both of the other birds to assist in a captive breeding program. That effort has been unsuccessful. Alan Lieberman, the San Diego Zoo's avian conservation coordinator, said the chances for survival of the species were "infinitesimally small" after the bird's sudden death Friday.
NEWS
February 4, 1999
Ed Herlihy, 89, a radio announcer who was the voice of Kraft Foods for 40 years, died Saturday in New York. His voice was also heard on 1940s newsreels telling moviegoers about the battles of World War II and the end of the war in 1945.Marion Boyars, 71, one of Britain's first women publishers, died Monday in London. She developed a stable of writers that included five Nobel Prize winners.Adm. Harold E. Shear, 80, who rose to vice chief of naval operations during a 42-year Navy career and bolstered the use of submarines as a crucial part of the nation's nuclear deterrent, died Monday in Groton, Conn.
NEWS
By Orlando Sentinel | March 28, 1994
ORLANDO, Fla. -- Walt Disney World's next theme park will mix wild animals and environmental messages with elaborate thrill rides, a detailed outline of the project shows.The animal park planned for this central Florida city has a strong conservation theme, but its design could put competitors on the endangered species list.The proposed combination of roller coasters, gorillas and exotic settings mirrors the tourist appeal of Tampa's Busch Gardens. And a dinosaur section of the Disney project could take a bite out of the Jurassic Park attraction planned for Universal Studios Florida.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman and michelle.deal@baltsun.com | February 12, 2010
Put down the shovel. Pick up your suitcase. Enough with the snow - it's time for a winter escape. Here are 10 destinations that would make a perfect sun-filled vacation, even if it's only just a fantasy: 1. Bermuda Go by boat, go by plane - whatever it takes, just get there. The island of pink sands is ideal for beach lovers and golf fans. When you book a trip by April 26 and stay three nights, the fourth night is free at select hotels. The "Golf-Around Getaway" offers three nights and three rounds of golf starting at $599 per person.
TRAVEL
By Chicago Tribune | August 10, 2008
America's Best Zoos: A Travel Guide for Fans and Families Intrepid Traveler, $15.95 It is an undisputed fact and yet it still seems surprising: Zoos in the United States attract more annual visitors than all spectator sports combined. Of course, some zoos are more famous than others, such as Busch Gardens Africa in Tampa, Fla., and the San Diego Zoo. But most zoos are not that celebrated and, although popular as the statistics attest, they are considered more a perfect choice for schoolchildren on a field trip and families on a Saturday afternoon rather than as a bona fide tourist attraction.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 29, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Hsing-Hsing, the National Zoo's giant panda who for more than a quarter-century served as diplomat, research subject and sweet-natured delight to millions, died yesterday morning. Zookeepers gave the panda a lethal injection after deciding that irreversible kidney disease had made his life too painful to endure. He was 28, an advanced age for a panda. Hsing-Hsing and his longtime female denmate, Ling-Ling, who died in 1992, were gifts to the United States from Mao Tse-tung in commemoration of President Richard M. Nixon's ice-breaking trip to China in 1972.
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