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San Andreas Fault

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By Sandra Blakeslee and Sandra Blakeslee,New York Times News Service | June 29, 1992
PASADENA, Calif. -- Seismologists had depressing news for frightened Southern Californians in the wake of yesterday's two powerful earthquakes.Instead of relieving tension on the San Andreas fault, the two earthquakes on adjacent faults near Landers and Big Bear Lake probably increased seismic strain in the region. Thus the dreaded "Big One," a catastrophic magnitude 8-plus earthquake that is sure to strike some day, may hit sooner rather than later."There is nothing to suggest stress has been relieved on the San Andreas," said Dr. Lucile M. Jones, a seismologist at the U.S. Geological Survey office in Pasadena.
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NEWS
April 16, 2006
As San Francisco marks the 100th anniversary of its great earthquake and fire this Tuesday, it's worth asking, in light of the terrible natural calamity of our own century, about the aftermath. What followed the disaster? It has been almost eight months since Hurricane Katrina made New Orleans its biggest and most famous casualty. Thousands of the city's citizens are still scattered, thousands of its homes still uninhabitable. Huge amounts of work have yet to get under way, stalled by insurance squabbles and the wait for federal funds and regulations (some of which were announced last week)
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NEWS
By DAN BERGER | August 27, 1992
First it was a line in the sand. Now it is a line in the air.Building a condo on the hurricane coast, as atop the San Andreas Fault, is playing with Fate.Sweden considers espionage a mere "political crime," except when it is against Sweden.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 7, 1994
LOS ANGELES -- A magnitude-4.8 earthquake shook much of Southern California yesterday, causing a few cracks in buildings near the epicenter and sending some rocks onto a highway.No injuries were reported in the temblor at 12:01 p.m., which scientists at the California Institute of Technology and the U.S. Geological Survey said was outside the aftershock zone of the 1992 Landers and Big Bear earthquakes and therefore was a separate seismic event.The temblor was also unrelated to the earthquake Jan. 17 in Los Angeles' San Fernando Valley that left 61 people dead.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | December 6, 1990
SAN FRANCISCO -- A previously unknown undersea fault is causing the islands off Southern California to slip northwestward at about a half-inch a year, possibly building up seismic strain for a major earthquake that could affect several Southern California cities, a scientist reported here yesterday.The fault, which appears to run 20 to 50 miles offshore and parallel to the San Andreas Fault, has been slipping without the usual small quakes to relieve strain. This makes a quake of about magnitude 7 a real possibility, said seismologist David D. Jackson of the University of California, Los Angeles, at a meeting of the American Geophysical Union.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 7, 1994
LOS ANGELES -- A magnitude-4.8 earthquake shook much of Southern California yesterday, causing a few cracks in buildings near the epicenter and sending some rocks onto a highway.No injuries were reported in the temblor at 12:01 p.m., which scientists at the California Institute of Technology and the U.S. Geological Survey said was outside the aftershock zone of the 1992 Landers and Big Bear earthquakes and therefore was a separate seismic event.The temblor was also unrelated to the earthquake Jan. 17 in Los Angeles' San Fernando Valley that left 61 people dead.
NEWS
April 16, 2006
As San Francisco marks the 100th anniversary of its great earthquake and fire this Tuesday, it's worth asking, in light of the terrible natural calamity of our own century, about the aftermath. What followed the disaster? It has been almost eight months since Hurricane Katrina made New Orleans its biggest and most famous casualty. Thousands of the city's citizens are still scattered, thousands of its homes still uninhabitable. Huge amounts of work have yet to get under way, stalled by insurance squabbles and the wait for federal funds and regulations (some of which were announced last week)
NEWS
February 10, 2009
Series NCIS: : Gibbs (Mark Harmon) confronts demons from his past when he finds a cryptic message waiting for him at a crime scene. (8 p.m., WJZ-Channel 13) The Biggest Loser: : A balancing competition will bring the winner a 24-hour visit from a loved one. (8 p.m., WBAL-Channel 11) 90210: : Naomi (AnnaLynne McCord) is smitten with a bartender who's surrounded by mystery. (8 p.m., WNUV-Channel 54) American Idol: : The Hollywood round continues. (8 p.m., WBFF-Channel 45) How the Earth Was Made: : The new series premieres with a trip along the San Andreas Fault.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 17, 2005
LOS ANGELES - An earthquake roiled southern California early yesterday afternoon, shoving bottles and bric-a-brac from shelves and shaking buildings from the desert to the Pacific Ocean. At least one injury was reported at a resort in Lake Arrowhead. There were also reports of minor damage, including downed telephone lines. Two rockslides were reported in San Bernardino County. Yesterday's earthquake followed several others during the past week. An earthquake of magnitude 7.0 rattled off of the coast of northern California on Tuesday evening.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | May 1, 2009
Meteors that smashed into the planet Mercury 3.9 billion years ago are giving scientists a glimpse deep into the tiny planet's interior and providing clues to how it has evolved in the eons since. The 430-mile-wide Rembrandt impact basin, first seen by NASA's Maryland-built Messenger spacecraft during two flybys last year, preserves cracks created during ancient upheavals from beneath the basin, as well as ridges formed like wrinkles as the planet cooled and shrank. "This is really exciting, because this pattern of tectonic land forms is different than anything we see anywhere in the solar system," said Thomas Watters, a scientist with the Smithsonian Institution in Washington who is part of the Messenger team.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | August 27, 1992
First it was a line in the sand. Now it is a line in the air.Building a condo on the hurricane coast, as atop the San Andreas Fault, is playing with Fate.Sweden considers espionage a mere "political crime," except when it is against Sweden.
NEWS
By Sandra Blakeslee and Sandra Blakeslee,New York Times News Service | June 29, 1992
PASADENA, Calif. -- Seismologists had depressing news for frightened Southern Californians in the wake of yesterday's two powerful earthquakes.Instead of relieving tension on the San Andreas fault, the two earthquakes on adjacent faults near Landers and Big Bear Lake probably increased seismic strain in the region. Thus the dreaded "Big One," a catastrophic magnitude 8-plus earthquake that is sure to strike some day, may hit sooner rather than later."There is nothing to suggest stress has been relieved on the San Andreas," said Dr. Lucile M. Jones, a seismologist at the U.S. Geological Survey office in Pasadena.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | December 6, 1990
SAN FRANCISCO -- A previously unknown undersea fault is causing the islands off Southern California to slip northwestward at about a half-inch a year, possibly building up seismic strain for a major earthquake that could affect several Southern California cities, a scientist reported here yesterday.The fault, which appears to run 20 to 50 miles offshore and parallel to the San Andreas Fault, has been slipping without the usual small quakes to relieve strain. This makes a quake of about magnitude 7 a real possibility, said seismologist David D. Jackson of the University of California, Los Angeles, at a meeting of the American Geophysical Union.
NEWS
By Michael Muskal and Daryl Kelley and Michael Muskal and Daryl Kelley,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 29, 2004
A strong earthquake shook California from Los Angeles to San Francisco yesterday, cracking pipes, breaking bottles of wine and knocking pictures from walls. Although a U.S. Geological Survey spokeswoman placed the magnitude of the quake at 6.0 - significant enough to be felt over hundreds of miles - there were no immediate reports of injuries or significant damage. The quake struck at 10:15 a.m. Pacific time in a rural area about seven miles southeast of Parkfield, Calif., USGS spokeswoman Stephanie Hanna said.
FEATURES
By Arline Bleecker and Arline Bleecker,ORLANDO SENTINEL | September 24, 1995
If cruising to the desert sounds like a physical impossibility, consider the Sea of Cortez -- a region where an environmental phenomenon has made the impossible possible. It's where the desert meets the sea -- literally.More than 50 desert islands dot the 700-mile sea.Millions of years ago, a shift in the San Andreas fault ripped what is now Baja California from the flank of mainland Mexico. When the Pacific rushed in to fill the gap, it created the Sea of Cortez, or the Gulf of California.
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