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NEWS
September 3, 1992
Postmaster General Marvin T. Runyon didn't earn his nickname of "Carvin' Marvin" by standing over the dining room table dissecting a Thanksgiving turkey. He won it by chopping overhead to the bone at the Tennessee Valley Authority. Now he has embarked on an even more massive surgical procedure at the U.S. Postal Service.Phase One hit the military-like bureaucracy last month when Mr. Runyon announced a 25 percent cut in management ranks through early retirement buyouts. Some 30,000 jobs will be abolished and the entire flow chart simplified.
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December 6, 2011
Harford County sheriff's deputies and Maryland State Police report: Aberdeen Steven Ryan Dalmida, 47, of the 800 block of Oxford Avenue, was arrested on two bench warrants Thursday in cases he was charged with paraphernalia possession and two counts of marijuana possession. Timothy S. Mauck, 20, of the 100 block of Poplar Hill Road, was charged Thursday with marijuana possession and possession with intent to distribute. Derek Edwin Snidow, 20, of the 1400 block of Old Philadelphia Road, was charged Friday with being a rogue and vagabond.
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NEWS
By Justin Fenton | justin.fenton@baltsun.com | January 29, 2010
City prosecutors ruled Thursday that a Johns Hopkins student who killed an intruder last fall by using a samurai sword was justified in his actions, according to a letter sent to homicide investigators. State's Attorney Patricia C. Jessamy said prosecutors determined that the student, John Pontolillo, "reasonably believed he was in danger of imminent death or serious bodily injury" and was justified in striking Donald Rice, a 49-year-old repeat offender who is believed to have broken into the student's home earlier in the night.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton | justin.fenton@baltsun.com | January 29, 2010
City prosecutors ruled Thursday that a Johns Hopkins student who killed an intruder last fall by using a samurai sword was justified in his actions, according to a letter sent to homicide investigators. State's Attorney Patricia C. Jessamy said prosecutors determined that the student, John Pontolillo, "reasonably believed he was in danger of imminent death or serious bodily injury" and was justified in striking Donald Rice, a 49-year-old repeat offender who is believed to have broken into the student's home earlier in the night.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | April 10, 1995
The first of the big "foreign" movies to clue blinkered Western audiences into the idea that there was more to filmmaking than the Warner Brothers and that some of the world's best was going on in a defeated enemy's backyard was Akira Kurosawa's "Rashomon," which blasted its way to a world audience in 1951.The second is not nearly so well-remembered, though in many ways it became more of a font for Japanese culture in America than "Rashomon." Among other things, it helped invent John Belushi.
SPORTS
April 18, 2006
A distant fifth-place finish behind Sinister Minister in Saturday's Blue Grass Stakes has taken First Samurai out of consideration for the Kentucky Derby. The son of Giant's Causeway, winner of the Grade I Hopeful and Champagne Stakes at 2 years old and winner via disqualification of this year's Grade II Fountain of Youth, finished more than 30 lengths behind Sinister Minister in his first attempt at 1 1/8 miles. Trainer Frank Brothers said there would be no attempt at the Derby's 1 1/4 miles.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 23, 2006
Whether in The Adventures of Robin Hood or The Wild Bunch, action-movie art often occurs when directors apply fierce commitment and instinct to implausible exploits - and create revelation, wonder and excitement. Nowhere is that more evident than in the masterworks of Japan's great director Akira Kurosawa and his lesser-known equal Masaki Kobayashi. They and their stars, Toshiro Mifune and Tatsuya Nakadai, are at the center of the Charles Theatre's three-month series of samurai movies, playing Saturdays at noon, Mondays at 7 p.m. and Thursdays at 9 p.m., through mid-September.
BUSINESS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Tokyo Bureau | June 14, 1992
Kawasaki, Japan - In the wood-floored gymnasium, some of Japan's best and brightest stand, balancing on one foot. A tape recording counts the seconds.One by one, they lose their balance and sit down on the floor. After four minutes, the tape recording stops and the gym bursts into cheers for the handful still standing.This scene at Toshiba Corp.'s training center is part of a daylong health check -- and gut check -- for the 330 men and 70 women who are part of the company's spring recruiting class.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 5, 2003
The Last Samurai is both insane and not insane enough. In this glossy period piece, Tom Cruise plays an American Army officer who picks a lunatic way to assuage his guilt over the atrocities of the Indian Wars. He joins the ranks of a master warrior (Ken Watanabe) who leads a samurai revolt against his own emperor's army and the forces of modernism in 1876 Japan. The moviemakers treat the moral equivalence of Indians and samurai as if it were the most natural thing in the world. Apart from using time-honored weapons like bows and arrows against technologically advanced armies, what do Indian tribes have in common with this remnant of medieval Japan?
NEWS
September 22, 2009
Was the samurai-sword killing of an intruder by a Johns Hopkins University student an act of justifiable self-defense? Yes 86% No 7% Not sure 6% (2,851 votes, results not scientific) Next poll: : Baltimore's law prohibiting trans fats in restaurants and other eateries is due to take effect next week. Do you support the ban? Vote at baltimoresun.com/vote
NEWS
By Justin Fenton | justin.fenton@baltsun.com | January 28, 2010
City prosecutors ruled Thursday that a Johns Hopkins student who killed an intruder by slicing him with a samurai sword was justified in his actions, according to a letter sent to homicide investigators. State's Attorney Patricia C. Jessamy said prosecutors determined the student, John Pontolillo, "reasonably believed he was in danger of imminent death or serious bodily injury" and was justified in striking Donald Rice, a 49-year-old repeat offender who is believed to have broken into the student's home earlier in the night.
NEWS
By PETER HERMANN | October 11, 2009
When a Johns Hopkins University undergraduate used a samurai sword to kill an intruder last month, many people supported the student, who told police he acted in self-defense and expressed sadness that a human life had been lost. It was a tragedy, both for the 20-year-old from New Jersey and for the 49-year-old repeat offender who had just been released from jail a few days before he was killed. Fellow students and many city residents rushed to John Pontolillo's defense, which is perfectly understandable and reasonable.
NEWS
September 22, 2009
Was the samurai-sword killing of an intruder by a Johns Hopkins University student an act of justifiable self-defense? Yes 86% No 7% Not sure 6% (2,851 votes, results not scientific) Next poll: : Baltimore's law prohibiting trans fats in restaurants and other eateries is due to take effect next week. Do you support the ban? Vote at baltimoresun.com/vote
NEWS
September 17, 2009
There is something vicious, sick and mean-spirited about much of the public's reaction to Tuesday's killing of a burglar by a Johns Hopkins University undergraduate with a samurai sword. The gleeful response is completely oblivious to the tragedy that now has engulfed two lives. Two lives? Yes, because one of the victims, however culpable, is now dead, while the other likely will be scarred psychologically for years to come by the devastating knowledge that he took another human life. The student, John Pontolillo, was no doubt on edge - someone had broken into the house he shares with roommates hours before and stolen electronic equipment.
NEWS
By Brent Jones, Liz F. Kay and Jill Rosen and Brent Jones, Liz F. Kay and Jill Rosen,brent.jones@baltsun.com | September 16, 2009
Hours earlier, someone had broken into John Pontolillo's house and taken two laptops and a video-game console. Now it was past midnight, and he heard noises coming from the garage out back. The Johns Hopkins University undergraduate didn't run. He didn't call the police. He grabbed his samurai sword. With the 3- to 5-foot-long, razor-sharp weapon in hand, police say, Pontolillo crept toward the noise. He noticed a side door in the garage had been pried open. When a man inside lunged at him, police say, the confrontation was fatal.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | July 12, 2009
A samurai's wife dazzles a bandit as she and her husband make their way through a deep wood. The brigand rapes her. Someone kills the samurai. (Maybe it was himself.) That's all we know for sure about the action in Rashomon, even after the director, Akira Kurosawa, stages it from four different perspectives. No director has matched his ability to develop a story by leaps and bounds while revealing irresolvable discrepancies. Is the bandit a bold combatant and ladies' man or a feral pig?
NEWS
By Justin Fenton | justin.fenton@baltsun.com | January 28, 2010
City prosecutors ruled Thursday that a Johns Hopkins student who killed an intruder by slicing him with a samurai sword was justified in his actions, according to a letter sent to homicide investigators. State's Attorney Patricia C. Jessamy said prosecutors determined the student, John Pontolillo, "reasonably believed he was in danger of imminent death or serious bodily injury" and was justified in striking Donald Rice, a 49-year-old repeat offender who is believed to have broken into the student's home earlier in the night.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | September 8, 2001
"IT'S important to know how far we've come," Chase Taylor said, standing on the lot next to the Banneker-Douglass Museum in Annapolis. Taylor is a young black man who interned this summer at the museum. He pointed to the lot next to the Banneker-Douglass building and a series of square, hut-size holes, evidence of the weeks of digging carried out by an archaeological team from the University of Maryland. The intern showed visitors the remains of a root cellar, where vegetables and wine were stored.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | February 9, 2007
In one of the few playful moments in Hannibal Rising, the evil genius with an advanced taste for humans dons a samurai mask (don't ask) that resembles the face guard Doctor Lecter wore to keep his fangs off innocent flesh in Silence of the Lambs. The image makes no sense, but it's kind of funny. Most of the movie makes too much sense and is no fun at all. Hannibal Rising (an inadvertently uproarious title) suggests this serial-killer franchise is on its last legs. "Secret origin" stories used to appear in old-time comics and pulp series right after a character clicked with the public and fans were yearning to know more.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Reporter | September 8, 2006
Martin Scorsese's The Last Waltz, which captures on film the final live performance of the legendary rock group known simply as The Band, will be shown at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday at the Hippodrome Theatre, 12 N. Eutaw St. It kicks off a seven-film retrospective of rock and roll films running through Saturday at the theater, which for years reigned as Baltimore's premiere movie palace. The remaining films in the series are 2006's Beastie Boys: Awesome, I F****in' Shot That! (7:30 p.m. Wednesday)
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