Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSamuelson
IN THE NEWS

Samuelson

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 7, 2004
On April 3, 2004, JOAN BAHNTGESAMUELSON died at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. Born April 24, 1935 in Middletown, NY, she was the daughter of C. William Bahntge and Agnus Margaret (nee Skeldon) Bahntge. Following the death of her mother shortly after birth, she was raised by her stepmother Gladys Delvina (nee Royer) Bahntge. She was an active member of the Eastern Star, Queen Esther Chapter #163 of Middletown, NY. Joan worked as a bookkeeper for Kidde Engineering Consultants for 29 years in Baltimore.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | April 9, 2013
  Baltimore's first Pita Pit, a fast-casual concept that serves Lebanese-style pitas, is set to open Wednesday on the west side of downtown.  The eatery at 413 W. Baltimore Street was originally scheduled to open in September but faced some delays as franchisee Drin Kaziaj finalized a lease and hired contractors. The restaurant will be part of a project with a Panera Bread Co., PNC Bank, Samuelson's Jewelers and State Employees Credit Union. It will employ about 20 full- and part-time workers.
Advertisement
SPORTS
By Phil Hersh and Phil Hersh,Chicago Tribune | November 1, 1990
CHICAGO -- The last time Joan Benoit Samuelson ran a marathon, it was a disaster.That is why Samuelson is close to withdrawing from Sunday's New York Marathon, which was to be her first marathon since Boston in April 1989."
EXPLORE
By Karen Nitkin | January 30, 2012
Robert Vigorito, founder and race director of the Columbia Triathlon Association, went straight to the top when choosing a spokesperson for his new race, the Iron Girl Columbia Half Marathon and Coed 5K, scheduled for April 29. Vigorito asked Joan Benoit Samuelson, a rock star in the world of racing -- breaker of world records, winner of marathons, and the first woman to win an Olympic marathon. Samuelson, now 54, is an ardent advocate for lifelong fitness, and, believe it or not, she still runs marathons.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman and Phil Jackman,Evening Sun Staff | November 2, 1990
One of the big names, Joan Benoit Samuelson, will be missing Sunday, but the fact is the New York City Marathon will never be wanting for marquee performers, so enormous has the event become.Samuelson, the 1984 Olympic champion, phoned regrets to race organizers from her home in Maine yesterday, citing leg and back problems. Along with a half-dozen other women, Samuelson had taken on the role of spoiler as Grete Waitz attempts to win her 10th race through the streets of the city's five boroughs.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | February 10, 1996
COLUMBIA, S.C. -- As Joan Samuelson made her way through a hotel hallway yesterday, people kept thrusting the same poster in front of her to autograph. It seemed to be of a different person, and, in many ways, it was.The picture on the poster was from the 1984 Olympics, showing a tired but happy marathoner holding an American flag after her victory lap at the Los Angeles Coliseum. It was a picture of Joan Benoit after winning the first women's marathon in Olympic history.It was taken a month before she married Scott Samuelson, three years before she had the first of their two children.
SPORTS
By Jan Hubbard and Jan Hubbard,Newsday | August 2, 1992
BARCELONA, Spain -- Bob Samuelson embraces his role as a villain. He says he is comfortable with it. He loves it when crowds jeer and boo and, in the case of Europe, whistle.But he does draw a line on the bad boy image."I hate Bill Laimbeer," Samuelson said, invoking a basketball comparison. "I like to think of myself as a [Charles] Barkley. I like to bang and play physical. . . . When Fred [Strum, the U.S. volleyball coach] puts me in the game, he wants me to be fired up. He wants me to talk and yell at my teammates and get them going."
SPORTS
January 3, 1992
RadioNBC's Marv Albert will be host of "Sports Forum" tonight at 5 on WITH (1230 AM). Albert's son, Kenny, the voice of the Baltimore Skipjacks, is one of the show's regular hosts.BaseballCal Ripken Jr. and his family will be guests at a governor's reception Tuesday at 2:30 p.m. at the State House in Annapolis. Gov. William Donald Schaefer is expected to issue a proclamation naming the Baltimore Orioles shortstop and American League MVP "Marylander of the Year."* George Steinbrenner confirmed that there has been movement to dispose of the two lawsuits brought against baseball by New York Yankees associates, further indicating that Steinbrenner is hoping to meet with commissioner Fay Vincent by next week to discuss his possible return.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | September 11, 2003
Ben Pfau was hungry. He had leftovers with four minutes left in yesterday's overtime game against visiting Calvert Hall. The sophomore's game-winning, close-range follow-up blast lifted Mount St. Joseph to a 3-2 Maryland Interscholastic Athletic Association A Conference victory in a boys soccer game. "Steve Vogt shot it, the defender deflected it, and I got the scraps," Pfau said. "Beating Calvert Hall in my first year on varsity feels great." The loss was the second straight for the No. 8 Cardinals (1-2 overall and conference)
NEWS
October 27, 1998
Albert Johnson, 73, a film critic and professor at the University of California, Berkeley, died Saturday of a heart attack in Chicago, where he was attending a film festival.Winnie Ruth Judd, 93, who spent 40 years in a mental hospital for killing two women and shipping their bodies to Los Angeles, died Friday in Phoenix. She became known across the nation as the "Trunk Murderess" after she was convicted in the Oct. 16, 1931, murders of Anne LeRoi, 32, and Hedvig "Sammy" Samuelson, 24.Alan Sainsbury, 96, who pioneered supermarkets in Britain and helped build a family grocery empire, died Wednesday at his home in Toppesfield, a village in Essex county, east of London.
SPORTS
August 20, 2011
Joan Benoit Samuelson twice won the Boston Marathon and then won the first women's Olympic marathon in 1984 in Los Angeles. Now 54, Benoit Samuelson was in Columbia on Friday to promote the first Columbia Iron Girl Half Marathon, scheduled for April 2012. The Columbia Iron Girl will hold its annual triathlon today. How did you become involved with the Tri-Columbia organization? [Founder] Robert Vigorito asked me if I'd be interested in coming down and helping promote the event and be part of the event.
NEWS
March 15, 2006
The Hippodrome Theatre's coming season can't be beat for showstoppers. Its playbill, featuring the best Broadway play and musical of 2005, reminds us how enticing this part of town is becoming. There's the theater, playing to impressive audiences. A big new Starbucks at the corner, 88 percent occupancy at the Centerpoint complex, a hip new Irish restaurant nearby, the renovation of the historic Abell building under way. Now if only the 400 block of W. Baltimore St. would clean up its act. The block remains a jumble of construction fencing, shuttered structures and a few businesses.
NEWS
April 7, 2004
On April 3, 2004, JOAN BAHNTGESAMUELSON died at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. Born April 24, 1935 in Middletown, NY, she was the daughter of C. William Bahntge and Agnus Margaret (nee Skeldon) Bahntge. Following the death of her mother shortly after birth, she was raised by her stepmother Gladys Delvina (nee Royer) Bahntge. She was an active member of the Eastern Star, Queen Esther Chapter #163 of Middletown, NY. Joan worked as a bookkeeper for Kidde Engineering Consultants for 29 years in Baltimore.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | September 11, 2003
Ben Pfau was hungry. He had leftovers with four minutes left in yesterday's overtime game against visiting Calvert Hall. The sophomore's game-winning, close-range follow-up blast lifted Mount St. Joseph to a 3-2 Maryland Interscholastic Athletic Association A Conference victory in a boys soccer game. "Steve Vogt shot it, the defender deflected it, and I got the scraps," Pfau said. "Beating Calvert Hall in my first year on varsity feels great." The loss was the second straight for the No. 8 Cardinals (1-2 overall and conference)
NEWS
October 27, 1998
Albert Johnson, 73, a film critic and professor at the University of California, Berkeley, died Saturday of a heart attack in Chicago, where he was attending a film festival.Winnie Ruth Judd, 93, who spent 40 years in a mental hospital for killing two women and shipping their bodies to Los Angeles, died Friday in Phoenix. She became known across the nation as the "Trunk Murderess" after she was convicted in the Oct. 16, 1931, murders of Anne LeRoi, 32, and Hedvig "Sammy" Samuelson, 24.Alan Sainsbury, 96, who pioneered supermarkets in Britain and helped build a family grocery empire, died Wednesday at his home in Toppesfield, a village in Essex county, east of London.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | February 10, 1996
COLUMBIA, S.C. -- As Joan Samuelson made her way through a hotel hallway yesterday, people kept thrusting the same poster in front of her to autograph. It seemed to be of a different person, and, in many ways, it was.The picture on the poster was from the 1984 Olympics, showing a tired but happy marathoner holding an American flag after her victory lap at the Los Angeles Coliseum. It was a picture of Joan Benoit after winning the first women's marathon in Olympic history.It was taken a month before she married Scott Samuelson, three years before she had the first of their two children.
NEWS
By George F. Will | January 18, 1996
WASHINGTON -- In 1930 in America average life expectancy at birth was 58 years for men, 61 for women. By 1990 it was 71 and 79 respectively.Until the 1930s the average manufacturing worker toiled nearly 50 hours a week with few rights or benefits. In 1996 about 80 percent of all workers have employer-paid health insurance.In 1940 most Americans were renters, most households had neither a refrigerator nor central heating, 30 percent lacked inside running water, coal fueled most furnaces and stoves, wood was the second most-used fuel.
BUSINESS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,New York Bureau | February 21, 1992
NEW YORK -- With the recession and a presidential campaign placing an extraordinary emphasis on economic policy, Wall Street Week, a Maryland Public Television production, will feature tonight two of the nation's most prominent economic gurus, Nobel laureates Milton Friedman and Paul Samuelson.Don't expect either to deliver a rousing new blueprint to quickly reinvigorate the nation, however.Indeed, while candidates and Congress are spewing forth one proposal after another stuffed with tax cuts and special incentives, these two men, heavyweight presidential advisers for the past three decades (as well as academically revered economic theoreticians)
NEWS
By George F. Will | January 18, 1996
WASHINGTON -- In 1930 in America average life expectancy at birth was 58 years for men, 61 for women. By 1990 it was 71 and 79 respectively.Until the 1930s the average manufacturing worker toiled nearly 50 hours a week with few rights or benefits. In 1996 about 80 percent of all workers have employer-paid health insurance.In 1940 most Americans were renters, most households had neither a refrigerator nor central heating, 30 percent lacked inside running water, coal fueled most furnaces and stoves, wood was the second most-used fuel.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,Washington Bureau Staff writer Gilbert A. Lewthwaite contributed to this article | November 3, 1993
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton surrounded himself yesterday with Big Names in an extraordinary White House rally in favor of the North American Free Trade Agreement that had more of the flavor of a religious revival than an economic debate.Paul Samuelson, a Nobel Prize-winning economist, spoke of "the age of miracles" not being over; the president appeared to be saying a prayer for members of Congress; and former President Jimmy Carter called on everyone in the room to make 12 proselytizing calls to win converts to the NAFTA faith.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.