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Samuel Smith

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NEWS
March 5, 2006
1776: A parcel of muskets During the Revolutionary War, the Harford County Committee met nearly 50 times and acted in accordance with the Continental Congress. The meetings mainly involved resolutions and collection of fines, and all items having to do with the gathering of arms and ammunitions "for the defence of their lives, liberties and properties." On March 4, 1776, the committee commissioned gunsmiths Isaac Thomas, John Cunningham and Samuel Smith to make a parcel of muskets. The muskets were to have steel ramrods and bayonets and cost not more than the Baltimore market price at the time.
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NEWS
May 1, 2011
The news of the often-tearful reception given Mayor William Donald Schaefer's last motorcade put me in mind of a similar procession in 1839. President Van Buren and his cabinet led the procession, right behind the hearse. Ships in the harbor lowered their flags. As the hearse passed, adults and children were seen crying in the street; many joined the procession. It was the biggest funeral in Baltimore up to then. Samuel Smith, the man they were honoring, had served 40 years in the U.S. Congress after two terms in the Maryland House of Delegates.
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FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | December 9, 1992
'Tis the season to drink special suds. Holiday beers, the special blends that brewmasters traditionally make around the winter solstice, are here.This year the thirst for holiday beers seems strong. Snow Goose, for example, the first winter beer brewed by Wild Goose brewery of Cambridge, was gone almost as soon as it landed in Baltimore. Similarly, a spokesman at Bond Distributing Co. said the only way Baltimore-area beer drinkers could get bottles of Samuel Adams Winter Lager would be to buy a 12-pack containing a variety of the Boston brewer's beers.
NEWS
March 5, 2006
1776: A parcel of muskets During the Revolutionary War, the Harford County Committee met nearly 50 times and acted in accordance with the Continental Congress. The meetings mainly involved resolutions and collection of fines, and all items having to do with the gathering of arms and ammunitions "for the defence of their lives, liberties and properties." On March 4, 1776, the committee commissioned gunsmiths Isaac Thomas, John Cunningham and Samuel Smith to make a parcel of muskets. The muskets were to have steel ramrods and bayonets and cost not more than the Baltimore market price at the time.
NEWS
May 1, 2011
The news of the often-tearful reception given Mayor William Donald Schaefer's last motorcade put me in mind of a similar procession in 1839. President Van Buren and his cabinet led the procession, right behind the hearse. Ships in the harbor lowered their flags. As the hearse passed, adults and children were seen crying in the street; many joined the procession. It was the biggest funeral in Baltimore up to then. Samuel Smith, the man they were honoring, had served 40 years in the U.S. Congress after two terms in the Maryland House of Delegates.
NEWS
By Peter Kumpa | October 15, 1990
ON SUNDAY morning, Aug. 10, 1835, Baltimore was a city without any element of law and order. Its leading citizens were in hiding; half a dozen of its most elegant mansions had been ripped apart and burned; hospitals were strained with scores of wounded. Five were dead from a night of rioting by a drunken mob which followed days of rising protest against the closed Bank of Maryland where small depositors had lost the little they had.For yet one more time, Baltimore called on Gen. Samuel Smith to save the city.
NEWS
June 10, 2005
On June 9, 2005, JOSEPH SAMUEL SMITH III, of Arnold. Beloved father of Jessica Goldsmith and Joseph Smith, IV; loving son of Bette J. Smith and the late Joseph S. Smith, Jr.; dear brother of Barbara Smith and Thomas B. Smith; loving grandfather of three. A Graveside Service will be held at Meadowridge Memorial Park, on Saturday at 11 A.M. Arrangements by the family owned Singleton Funeral Home, Glen Burnie. In lieu of flowers, memorials in his name to the Hospice of the Chesapeake, 445 Defense Highway, Annapolis, MD 21401.
NEWS
October 2, 2003
On September 30, 2003, SAMUEL AMOS SMITH. On Friday, friends may call at the Vaughn C. Greene Funeral Service, 5151 Balto. Nat'l Pike (Rt. 40), from 4:00 to 8:00 P.M. On Saturday, the family will receive friends from 10:30 to 11:00 A.M., with services to follow. Inquiries to(410) 233-2400.
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2014
Lord Baltimore Hotel (20 W. Baltimore St., 410-539-8400, lordbaltimorehotel.com) is getting into the commemorative spirit. The hotel is offering a Battle of Baltimore-themed three-course menu in its French Kitchen and LB Tavern venues, with menu items inspired by, or at least named for, personalities and events of the historic battle. Dishes include The Mary Pickersgill Plate (heirloom tomato, pickled beets, radishes, asparagus and blue cheese panna cotta); The General Samuel Smith (chicken “pot pie” with creamed spinach tartan, compressed chicken thigh, crispy chicken skin salad and carrot coriander puree)
NEWS
August 10, 2004
On August 8, 2004; LESLIE A. WHITE, beloved husband of Thelma O. White, devoted father of Leslie White, Jr., and Brenda W. Ne Smith, loving father-in-law of Samuel Ne Smith, Sr. He is also survived by four grandchildren and a host of other relatives and friends. On Wednesday friends may call at THE NEW VAUGHN C. GREENE FUNERAL SERVICES (RANDALLSTOWN), 8728 Liberty Road, from 3 to 8 P.M. On Thursday, the family will receive friends from 10:30 to 11 A.M. at the Union Memorial United Methodist Church, 2500 Harlem Avenue, with services to follow.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | December 9, 1992
'Tis the season to drink special suds. Holiday beers, the special blends that brewmasters traditionally make around the winter solstice, are here.This year the thirst for holiday beers seems strong. Snow Goose, for example, the first winter beer brewed by Wild Goose brewery of Cambridge, was gone almost as soon as it landed in Baltimore. Similarly, a spokesman at Bond Distributing Co. said the only way Baltimore-area beer drinkers could get bottles of Samuel Adams Winter Lager would be to buy a 12-pack containing a variety of the Boston brewer's beers.
NEWS
By Peter Kumpa | October 15, 1990
ON SUNDAY morning, Aug. 10, 1835, Baltimore was a city without any element of law and order. Its leading citizens were in hiding; half a dozen of its most elegant mansions had been ripped apart and burned; hospitals were strained with scores of wounded. Five were dead from a night of rioting by a drunken mob which followed days of rising protest against the closed Bank of Maryland where small depositors had lost the little they had.For yet one more time, Baltimore called on Gen. Samuel Smith to save the city.
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