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Samuel Mudd

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By CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | April 6, 1997
WASHINGTON - The 11-foot drop from the State Box of Ford's Theatre to the stage resulted in a broken left leg for John Wilkes Booth. The treatment of that leg by Dr. Samuel Mudd cost the doctor his freedom and his name.Today, 132 years later, Dr. Richard Mudd is working to clear the name of his grandfather, who was convicted by an 1865 military court for conspiring to kill President Lincoln and for harboring Booth overnight at his Charles County farmhouse.Richard Mudd and others are pressing administration officials to ask the secretary of the Army, Togo West, to exonerate the doctor.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2011
Mike Ricksecker, paranormal investigator and “ghostorian,” has had a lifelong passion for writing and mystery, which has led him to explore the realm of the paranormal. Ricksecker, 37, lives in Oklahoma but lived in Maryland while serving in the Air Force and, in 2010, published Ghosts of Maryland. He has published other ghost books and has appeared on Animal Planet's TV show “The Haunted.” Now, he shares one of his favorite paranormal experiences in Maryland, at the Dr. Samuel A. Mudd House in Waldorf.  If you're not familiar with Civil War history, Mudd gave haven to John Wilkes Booth after Booth assassinated President Abraham Lincoln; Mudd was convicted of conspiracy to murder Lincoln.
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NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 31, 2001
PHILADELPHIA - In the annals of history, the Mudd name has been inexorably linked with John Wilkes Booth - and the plot to assassinate President Abraham Lincoln at Ford's Theater in Washington in 1865. One hundred thirty-six years have passed since a military tribunal sentenced Samuel Mudd to life in prison for his part in the conspiracy; 132 years have passed since the sentence was commuted. Now, the doctor will have his day in a civilian court, after descendants - seeking to clear Mudd's name - won a legal victory this month.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to The Sun | December 30, 2007
It's almost universal knowledge that John Wilkes Booth assassinated Abraham Lincoln at Ford's Theater on an April night in 1865. But after taking a guided bus tour in 1986 that detailed Booth's escape route, Tom Jennings discovered that there was a lot more to the story. "Many people don't know that Booth was on the run for 12 days ...
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | January 12, 2002
"No mortal mind can appreciate the feelings of one who has been so foully dealt with, and separated suddenly and violently from family and all near and dear, and banished hundreds of miles away ... for no fault, and having done my duty to God and man ..." Samuel A. Mudd, Fort Jefferson, Dry Tortugas, October 18, 1865 "I feel that I complied with every duty to God, to man and to the Government. My conscience rests easy under all the grossly false and frivolous charges notwithstanding their approval by an unjust, bigoted, and partisan court ..."
NEWS
By Monica Norton and Monica Norton,Evening Sun Staff | January 17, 1992
An article in Friday's Evening Sun incorrectly reported that Candida Ewing Steel, the great-great granddaughter of Thomas Ewing Jr., would be leaving her law practice to start her own business. Steel will continue her law practice as well as begin a new business, Anne Arundel Dispute Resolution.Candida Ewing Steel stood across from her opposing counsel in the divorce case. He introduced himself as Richard J. Mudd.Very casually, Steel asked opposing counsel if by any chance he was related to Dr. Samuel Mudd, the man alleged to have been an accessory in the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln.
NEWS
May 23, 2002
Richard D. Mudd, 101, who spent much of his life trying to overturn his grandfather's conviction on charges of aiding Abraham Lincoln assassin John Wilkes Booth, died Tuesday at his home in Saginaw, Mich. Mr. Mudd, who retired in 1965 after 37 years as a physician for General Motors Corp., traveled the nation on speaking engagements, many of them before Civil War historical organizations. He spent decades trying to clear the name of his grandfather, Dr. Samuel A. Mudd, who treated Booth after the 1865 assassination of President Abraham Lincoln at Washington's Ford's Theater.
NEWS
By Carol Emert and Carol Emert,States News Service Joe Nawrozki contributed to this story | January 23, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Dr. Samuel Mudd, the Charles County doctor convicted in 1865 of conspiring to assassinate President Abraham Lincoln, was convicted unconstitutionally by a military tribunal even though he was a civilian and two of the judges on the panel were personal friends of Mr. Lincoln.Furthermore, it was revealed by a former veteran FBI agent that four of the witnesses who helped convict the physician were mentally unstable. The other two witnesses at Mudd's trial doubted his complicity in the assassination.
NEWS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,Staff Writer | February 13, 1993
RICHMOND, Va. -- It is Feb. 12, 1867.President Abraham Lincoln, who would have celebrated his 58th birthday today, was assassinated nearly two years ago. Dr. Samuel A. Mudd, a country doctor from Charles County in Maryland, is finally having his day in court.That was the scene yesterday in a mock courtroom at the University of Richmond School of Law. Renowned legal sages, including the flamboyant defense attorney F. Lee Bailey, staged a moot trial to determine whether Dr. Mudd truly was guilty of conspiring to kill President Lincoln in 1865.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to The Sun | December 30, 2007
It's almost universal knowledge that John Wilkes Booth assassinated Abraham Lincoln at Ford's Theater on an April night in 1865. But after taking a guided bus tour in 1986 that detailed Booth's escape route, Tom Jennings discovered that there was a lot more to the story. "Many people don't know that Booth was on the run for 12 days ...
NEWS
May 23, 2002
Richard D. Mudd, 101, who spent much of his life trying to overturn his grandfather's conviction on charges of aiding Abraham Lincoln assassin John Wilkes Booth, died Tuesday at his home in Saginaw, Mich. Mr. Mudd, who retired in 1965 after 37 years as a physician for General Motors Corp., traveled the nation on speaking engagements, many of them before Civil War historical organizations. He spent decades trying to clear the name of his grandfather, Dr. Samuel A. Mudd, who treated Booth after the 1865 assassination of President Abraham Lincoln at Washington's Ford's Theater.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | January 12, 2002
"No mortal mind can appreciate the feelings of one who has been so foully dealt with, and separated suddenly and violently from family and all near and dear, and banished hundreds of miles away ... for no fault, and having done my duty to God and man ..." Samuel A. Mudd, Fort Jefferson, Dry Tortugas, October 18, 1865 "I feel that I complied with every duty to God, to man and to the Government. My conscience rests easy under all the grossly false and frivolous charges notwithstanding their approval by an unjust, bigoted, and partisan court ..."
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 31, 2001
PHILADELPHIA - In the annals of history, the Mudd name has been inexorably linked with John Wilkes Booth - and the plot to assassinate President Abraham Lincoln at Ford's Theater in Washington in 1865. One hundred thirty-six years have passed since a military tribunal sentenced Samuel Mudd to life in prison for his part in the conspiracy; 132 years have passed since the sentence was commuted. Now, the doctor will have his day in a civilian court, after descendants - seeking to clear Mudd's name - won a legal victory this month.
NEWS
By CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | April 6, 1997
WASHINGTON - The 11-foot drop from the State Box of Ford's Theatre to the stage resulted in a broken left leg for John Wilkes Booth. The treatment of that leg by Dr. Samuel Mudd cost the doctor his freedom and his name.Today, 132 years later, Dr. Richard Mudd is working to clear the name of his grandfather, who was convicted by an 1865 military court for conspiring to kill President Lincoln and for harboring Booth overnight at his Charles County farmhouse.Richard Mudd and others are pressing administration officials to ask the secretary of the Army, Togo West, to exonerate the doctor.
NEWS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,Staff Writer | February 13, 1993
RICHMOND, Va. -- It is Feb. 12, 1867.President Abraham Lincoln, who would have celebrated his 58th birthday today, was assassinated nearly two years ago. Dr. Samuel A. Mudd, a country doctor from Charles County in Maryland, is finally having his day in court.That was the scene yesterday in a mock courtroom at the University of Richmond School of Law. Renowned legal sages, including the flamboyant defense attorney F. Lee Bailey, staged a moot trial to determine whether Dr. Mudd truly was guilty of conspiring to kill President Lincoln in 1865.
NEWS
By Carol Emert and Carol Emert,States News Service Joe Nawrozki contributed to this story | January 23, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Dr. Samuel Mudd, the Charles County doctor convicted in 1865 of conspiring to assassinate President Abraham Lincoln, was convicted unconstitutionally by a military tribunal even though he was a civilian and two of the judges on the panel were personal friends of Mr. Lincoln.Furthermore, it was revealed by a former veteran FBI agent that four of the witnesses who helped convict the physician were mentally unstable. The other two witnesses at Mudd's trial doubted his complicity in the assassination.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2011
Mike Ricksecker, paranormal investigator and “ghostorian,” has had a lifelong passion for writing and mystery, which has led him to explore the realm of the paranormal. Ricksecker, 37, lives in Oklahoma but lived in Maryland while serving in the Air Force and, in 2010, published Ghosts of Maryland. He has published other ghost books and has appeared on Animal Planet's TV show “The Haunted.” Now, he shares one of his favorite paranormal experiences in Maryland, at the Dr. Samuel A. Mudd House in Waldorf.  If you're not familiar with Civil War history, Mudd gave haven to John Wilkes Booth after Booth assassinated President Abraham Lincoln; Mudd was convicted of conspiracy to murder Lincoln.
NEWS
By Monica Norton and Monica Norton,Evening Sun Staff | January 17, 1992
An article in Friday's Evening Sun incorrectly reported that Candida Ewing Steel, the great-great granddaughter of Thomas Ewing Jr., would be leaving her law practice to start her own business. Steel will continue her law practice as well as begin a new business, Anne Arundel Dispute Resolution.Candida Ewing Steel stood across from her opposing counsel in the divorce case. He introduced himself as Richard J. Mudd.Very casually, Steel asked opposing counsel if by any chance he was related to Dr. Samuel Mudd, the man alleged to have been an accessory in the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln.
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