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Samuel Coleridge Taylor

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By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,Staff Writer | April 9, 1993
Two Baltimore public elementary schools were listed among "America's Best Schools" in this month's issue of Redbook magazine.Mount Washington Elementary in Northwest Baltimore was honored for "overall excellence" and Samuel Coleridge-Taylor Elementary in West Baltimore for showing "significant improvement" in attendance and academic achievement, according to Redbook's annual America's Best Schools project.Samuel Coleridge-Taylor serves children from some of the poorest homes in Baltimore.
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NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,Staff Writer | April 9, 1993
Two Baltimore public elementary schools were listed among "America's Best Schools" in this month's issue of Redbook magazine.Mount Washington Elementary in Northwest Baltimore was honored for "overall excellence" and Samuel Coleridge-Taylor Elementary in West Baltimore for showing "significant improvement" in attendance and academic achievement, according to Redbook's annual America's Best Schools project.Samuel Coleridge-Taylor serves children from some of the poorest homes in Baltimore.
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NEWS
By Mark Bomster and Mark Bomster,Evening Sun Staff | October 23, 1990
It is dismissal time at Samuel Coleridge-Taylor Elementary School, and the children are restless as mustangs in a crowded corral.In a rear hallway next to the parking lot exit, they struggle to stay in line, fidgeting with rain jackets and backpacks.The teachers ride herd gently but firmly, keeping their classes together until each gets the signal to dismiss.Then, one by one, the classes head out the door, children galloping across the rainy school yard under colorful umbrellas.Presiding over all of this, in person, is Deborah Wortham, the school's dynamic new principal.
NEWS
By Mark Bomster and Mark Bomster,Evening Sun Staff | October 23, 1990
It is dismissal time at Samuel Coleridge-Taylor Elementary School, and the children are restless as mustangs in a crowded corral.In a rear hallway next to the parking lot exit, they struggle to stay in line, fidgeting with rain jackets and backpacks.The teachers ride herd gently but firmly, keeping their classes together until each gets the signal to dismiss.Then, one by one, the classes head out the door, children galloping across the rainy school yard under colorful umbrellas.Presiding over all of this, in person, is Deborah Wortham, the school's dynamic new principal.
NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | December 2, 2000
It was a kid's dream: All the hot dogs, pizza, hamburgers, french fries, spaghetti, tossed salad, fried chicken, punch and ice cream one could eat or drink. And it had Taishay Williams, 9, hankering for more. The would-be pediatrician, a fourth-grader at Samuel Coleridge-Taylor Elementary School in West Baltimore, said she plans to work even harder to be invited back next year to a lunch for successful pupils at Martin's West in Baltimore County. "I think I can do a little bit better than what I did, and maybe I'll get to come here next year if my report card is good," Taishay said.
NEWS
April 16, 2000
Area schools and literacy programs seek volunteers to help children and adults improve reading skills and to assist in related projects. Among them are: Samuel Coleridge-Taylor Elementary School, 507 W. Preston St., Baltimore, needs volunteer tutors to teach reading in grades one through five, from 9 a.m. to 3: 40 p.m. and for the after-school tutorial program from 3: 45 p.m. to 5: 30 p.m. Mondays, Tuesdays and Wednesdays. Volunteers also needed from 9 a.m. to noon for Saturday school.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | December 20, 2000
IN THE HUGE BALLROOM at the swank Martin's West, you could hear the little tykes' chatter before you hit the door. Just below the hum of their voices, you could hear their feet patter as they scampered to and from a buffet table covered with assorted vittles. They'd earned it - a day off from school and a free lunch at Martin's West. The 110 pupils from Samuel Coleridge-Taylor Elementary School were rewarded recently for good attendance, behavior and grades. To qualify, the youngsters couldn't have had more than three absences, no more than one C on their report cards and couldn't have been sent to the office more than three times.
NEWS
By Magdalene B. Fennell | December 4, 1990
MARK BOMSTER'S article, "The principal is diving right into the future" (Evening Sun, Oct. 29) was bittersweet to alumni of the Samuel Coleridge-Tayor Elementary School.It was sweet to learn that the school is still alive at its original location on West Preston Street; bitter to hear that it is now "a combat zone." The neighborhood around it was always poor, but we who attended the school in the late '30s got a first-class education.In that long ago, Samuel Coleridge-TayMagdaleneB. Fennelllor was called a platoon school and administered much like the junior highs of recent times.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Special to The Sun | May 6, 1994
New Wave of Entertainment's "Showcase of Stars" will be showcasing a special star indeed next Thursday, when classical pianist Raymond Jackson performs at the Unitarian Universalist Church of Annapolis. The concert begins at 8 p.m.Dr. Jackson, a professor of music at Howard University, has concertized internationally as a recitalist and orchestral soloist to great critical acclaim."A masterly talent . . . he will conquer concert halls all over the world," wrote the Suddeutsche Zeitung of Munich, Germany.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | October 26, 1995
Gladys Elizabeth Wallace, a retired elementary teacher who taught for 37 years at Baltimore's Samuel Coleridge Taylor Elementary School, died Sunday of heart failure at the University of Maryland Medical Center. She was 88.The Northwest Baltimore resident began teaching in Baltimore in 1931 after moving here from Winston Salem, N.C., where she began her teaching career in 1928 in a segregated school.When she joined the faculty at Samuel Coleridge Taylor, it was the first school built in the city for black students.
FEATURES
March 18, 1998
"My favorite book is 'Arthur's Eyes' by Marc Brown. Arthur gets new glasses and his sister, D.W., laughs at him. He ignores her, though. The best part of the book is when Arthur goes into the girls' bathroom by mistake before he gets his glasses."- Ivory Robinson, Grade 3Samuel Coleridge Taylor Elementary"'A Book of Satellites for You,' by Franklin M. Branley, is the best book I ever read. Here are some things I learned. One is that the moon is a satellite. It goes around the planet earth.
NEWS
June 28, 2003
Theresa B. Cley, a retired city elementary school teacher, died Sunday of pneumonia at Howard County General Hospital. The longtime Ashburton resident was 92. Born Theresa Blake in Kent County's Broadneck, she received a diploma from the old Bowie Normal School in 1930. She later earned a degree in education from what was then Morgan State College. She also studied at then-Hampton Institute and Temple University. She taught for 11 years in the Kent County public school system and for another 28 years in Baltimore.
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