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By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Special to The Sun | February 10, 1995
With Perlmans, Zuckermans, Lins, Midoris, Shahams and Bells already on hand, and scads of other first-class fiddlers popping up even as we speak, we truly live in a golden age of violin playing.Classical music lovers are blessed by an embarrassment of riches. Not only have impeccably high standards become the norm in concert halls, but the repertoire has expanded as well. After all, you can't perform the Beethoven Concerto every night.And how many Bruch and Mendelssohn concertos do even the most rabid violin aficionados need in their CD collections?
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FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | September 6, 2005
Maybe classical music is struggling to survive, but you'd never guess that looking at all the performances scheduled around here in the months ahead. The new season hasn't even shifted into high gear, and already there's an abundance of events. Take a look at this weekend. Two new chamber music ventures will be launched, both in the elegant ambience of historic mansions and, as it happens, both on the same afternoon. (The frequency of calendar overload on the local music scene gets worse every year.
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NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 9, 2002
The Annapolis Symphony Orchestra expects more from its concert soloists than a fine performance. When guest artists arrive in Annapolis, they're invited to become part of the ASO's Outreach and Adopt-A-School programs to bring classical music to local schools. Recently, cellist Julie Albers, who gave a dazzling performance of Samuel Barber's Cello Concerto last weekend, addressed an audience of about 100, from preschoolers to college students, at Anne Arundel Community College's Pascal Center.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 11, 2005
After his February performances of Carousel with the Annapolis Chorale and Annapolis Chamber Orchestra, Music Director J. Ernest Green started down the homestretch of his season-long 20th-anniversary celebration with an exciting departure in an instrumental concert titled "What Makes Music Great." Green led a musical adventure Saturday that gave the audience an up-close and personal view of the string section of the chamber orchestra. The audience enjoyed a concert of great music by Bach, Mozart, Gustav Holst and Samuel Barber at St. Anne's Parish House on Duke of Gloucester Street in Annapolis.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 25, 2001
It will be "Mozart and More" on Saturday evening when the Columbia Orchestra and its conductor Jason Love take center stage at Jim Rouse Theatre. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart's "Prague" Symphony and G major Violin Concerto will be performed at the 8 p.m. concert along with Samuel Barber's "2nd Essay for Orchestra," presented in keeping with the "American Century" theme of the orchestra's 2000-2001 season. "People who don't necessarily love so-called `modern music' shouldn't be scared off for a moment by Samuel Barber," says Love, who will be conducting the 10-minute, single-movement "2nd Essay" for the first time Saturday.
FEATURES
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff | March 6, 1991
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra will play slightly fewer works by perennial favorites Beethoven, Mozart and Tchaikovsky and more unfamiliar pieces in the new 1991-92 season announced yesterday. But Samuel Barber, Johannes Brahms and Sergei Rachmaninoff get a good hearing.The BSO plays three selections each of Beethoven, Mozart and Tchaikovsky in the 1991-92 Celebrity and Favorites series, compared with four Beethovens, four Tchaikovskys and nine Mozarts during this season noting the 200th anniversary of Mozart's death.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Contributing writer | January 17, 1992
One of America's finest was presented in concert last week at Mahan Hall on the campus of the U.S. Naval Academy.John Browning is a front-rank American pianist who has remained on top of his game since his debut with the New York Philharmonic in 1956.Browning is one of those exalted performers who has made his markacross the entire spectrum of the piano repertory. His affinity for the great virtuoso works of the Romantic period is well known; his recorded anthologies of Liszt and Rachmaninov are much admired.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 11, 2005
After his February performances of Carousel with the Annapolis Chorale and Annapolis Chamber Orchestra, Music Director J. Ernest Green started down the homestretch of his season-long 20th-anniversary celebration with an exciting departure in an instrumental concert titled "What Makes Music Great." Green led a musical adventure Saturday that gave the audience an up-close and personal view of the string section of the chamber orchestra. The audience enjoyed a concert of great music by Bach, Mozart, Gustav Holst and Samuel Barber at St. Anne's Parish House on Duke of Gloucester Street in Annapolis.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | February 26, 1993
When the late Andrew Schenck won a Grammy Wednesday night, it was typical that scarcely anyone noticed his name.Schenck, who died of cancer a year ago, won for his world premiere recording on the Koch label of Samuel Barber's "The Lovers." The prize was awarded for Contemporary Composition. Good as it is and deserving as it is, however, "The Lovers" is hardly a new work. That anyone knows about it -- that it got recorded at all -- is what Schenck was all about."The Lovers" was written 23 years ago and Barber, by that point, had been written off by most of the classical music establishment.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 19, 2002
Beauty may be, as the title character of Samuel Barber's 1958 opera Vanessa puts it, "the hardest gift to keep." But some folks manage to keep it awfully well. Just check out the soprano in that role when the Washington Opera opens its production of Barber's moody work tonight. She's Kiri Te Kanawa - Dame Kiri, by rights, since Queen Elizabeth gave her that honor in 1982, the year after she sang for the Lady Diana/Prince Charles wedding before a TV audience of 600 million. Te Kanawa's rare combination of physical and vocal beauty have long made her one of the opera world's favorite artists.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 19, 2002
Beauty may be, as the title character of Samuel Barber's 1958 opera Vanessa puts it, "the hardest gift to keep." But some folks manage to keep it awfully well. Just check out the soprano in that role when the Washington Opera opens its production of Barber's moody work tonight. She's Kiri Te Kanawa - Dame Kiri, by rights, since Queen Elizabeth gave her that honor in 1982, the year after she sang for the Lady Diana/Prince Charles wedding before a TV audience of 600 million. Te Kanawa's rare combination of physical and vocal beauty have long made her one of the opera world's favorite artists.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 9, 2002
The Annapolis Symphony Orchestra expects more from its concert soloists than a fine performance. When guest artists arrive in Annapolis, they're invited to become part of the ASO's Outreach and Adopt-A-School programs to bring classical music to local schools. Recently, cellist Julie Albers, who gave a dazzling performance of Samuel Barber's Cello Concerto last weekend, addressed an audience of about 100, from preschoolers to college students, at Anne Arundel Community College's Pascal Center.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 25, 2001
It will be "Mozart and More" on Saturday evening when the Columbia Orchestra and its conductor Jason Love take center stage at Jim Rouse Theatre. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart's "Prague" Symphony and G major Violin Concerto will be performed at the 8 p.m. concert along with Samuel Barber's "2nd Essay for Orchestra," presented in keeping with the "American Century" theme of the orchestra's 2000-2001 season. "People who don't necessarily love so-called `modern music' shouldn't be scared off for a moment by Samuel Barber," says Love, who will be conducting the 10-minute, single-movement "2nd Essay" for the first time Saturday.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Special to The Sun | February 10, 1995
With Perlmans, Zuckermans, Lins, Midoris, Shahams and Bells already on hand, and scads of other first-class fiddlers popping up even as we speak, we truly live in a golden age of violin playing.Classical music lovers are blessed by an embarrassment of riches. Not only have impeccably high standards become the norm in concert halls, but the repertoire has expanded as well. After all, you can't perform the Beethoven Concerto every night.And how many Bruch and Mendelssohn concertos do even the most rabid violin aficionados need in their CD collections?
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | February 26, 1993
When the late Andrew Schenck won a Grammy Wednesday night, it was typical that scarcely anyone noticed his name.Schenck, who died of cancer a year ago, won for his world premiere recording on the Koch label of Samuel Barber's "The Lovers." The prize was awarded for Contemporary Composition. Good as it is and deserving as it is, however, "The Lovers" is hardly a new work. That anyone knows about it -- that it got recorded at all -- is what Schenck was all about."The Lovers" was written 23 years ago and Barber, by that point, had been written off by most of the classical music establishment.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Contributing writer | January 17, 1992
One of America's finest was presented in concert last week at Mahan Hall on the campus of the U.S. Naval Academy.John Browning is a front-rank American pianist who has remained on top of his game since his debut with the New York Philharmonic in 1956.Browning is one of those exalted performers who has made his markacross the entire spectrum of the piano repertory. His affinity for the great virtuoso works of the Romantic period is well known; his recorded anthologies of Liszt and Rachmaninov are much admired.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | September 6, 2005
Maybe classical music is struggling to survive, but you'd never guess that looking at all the performances scheduled around here in the months ahead. The new season hasn't even shifted into high gear, and already there's an abundance of events. Take a look at this weekend. Two new chamber music ventures will be launched, both in the elegant ambience of historic mansions and, as it happens, both on the same afternoon. (The frequency of calendar overload on the local music scene gets worse every year.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | September 8, 1991
If last year was a musical party -- four major Baltimore musical institutions celebrated major anniversaries -- this season is the morning after.No one is suffering from a hangover -- there are no severe financial problems -- but the economy is down, expenses are up and things seem a little gray. The Baltimore Opera Company has cut back from four productions to three; the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra doesn't have soloists quite as glittering as in previous years; and the Shriver Hall series also seems a bit less ambitious.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | September 8, 1991
If last year was a musical party -- four major Baltimore musical institutions celebrated major anniversaries -- this season is the morning after.No one is suffering from a hangover -- there are no severe financial problems -- but the economy is down, expenses are up and things seem a little gray. The Baltimore Opera Company has cut back from four productions to three; the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra doesn't have soloists quite as glittering as in previous years; and the Shriver Hall series also seems a bit less ambitious.
FEATURES
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff | March 6, 1991
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra will play slightly fewer works by perennial favorites Beethoven, Mozart and Tchaikovsky and more unfamiliar pieces in the new 1991-92 season announced yesterday. But Samuel Barber, Johannes Brahms and Sergei Rachmaninoff get a good hearing.The BSO plays three selections each of Beethoven, Mozart and Tchaikovsky in the 1991-92 Celebrity and Favorites series, compared with four Beethovens, four Tchaikovskys and nine Mozarts during this season noting the 200th anniversary of Mozart's death.
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