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By Brad Snyder and Brad Snyder,Sun Staff Writer | July 22, 1994
WASHINGTON -- No one has benefited more from Pete Sampras' absence at the Legg Mason Tennis Classic than qualifier Michael Tebbutt.Tebbutt, the 145th-ranked player in the world, reached the quarterfinals yesterday by beating 69th-ranked Chuck Adams, 7-5, 4-6, 7-6 (10-8), in a wild match on Court 1 at the William H. G. FitzGerald Tennis Center.To face Adams, Tebbutt had to defeat Sampras' replacement, Mark Knowles."I feel lucky," Tebbutt said of not facing the No. 1-ranked Sampras, who pulled out of the tournament with an ankle injury.
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By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Sun Staff Correspondent | September 3, 1991
NEW YORK -- Years from now, they will talk of this day and night when the old man showed that if you can run, you can win. From the outside, others would speak of the miracles in the U.S. Open of 1991.But up close, right next to the stage at Louis Armstrong Stadium, all you could see and hear was this 39-year-old man running from end to end, grunting on every shot, his sneakers squeaking on the hard court. He was chasing balls into flowerpots, tearing into the net and showing exactly why he'll remain forever young.
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By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Staff Correspondent | September 10, 1990
NEW YORK -- Imagine, an American men's tennis player who doesn't surround himself with an entourage, wear a fluorescent outfit or turn a bad call into a three-part tragedy.And get this: the kid's heroes are Aussies. Not Mad Max or Crocodile Dundee. Guys named Laver and Rosewall, gentleman champions who knew how to play, knew how to win and knew how to lose.It sounds too good to be true. But Pete Sampras is the real thing, the throwback dressed in white who rushes the net and comes to play the big game: serve and volley.
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By Phil Jackman and Phil Jackman,SUN STAFF | September 22, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Pete Sampras is Randy Johnson with a tennis racket.The show he put on yesterday while blowing away Patrick Rafter, 6-7 (6-8), 6-1, 6-1, 6-4, giving the United States a decisive third match in a 4-1 Davis Cup semifinal victory over Australia, lent new meaning to the words domination and perfection.Sampras served 18 times, excluding the first-set tiebreaker, and lost just 15 points. He hit 14 aces and had just one double fault in the 2-hour, 19-minute match.Rafter didn't win a single point on Sampras' serve in the 25-minute second set. He scored only five of 21 points against Sampras' usual 120-mph lightning bolts in the 24-minute third set. Rafter never got to a break point.
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By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | September 4, 1996
NEW YORK -- This was the match everyone was geared up for at the U.S. Open. A match between No. 1 Pete Sampras and the big-serving Mark Philippoussis.Because Philippoussis beat Sampras in straight sets at the Australian Open, and because he can match Sampras big serve for big serve, observers anticipate another upset every time they meet.But in their match at Wimbledon, Sampras stalked off with a quick three-set victory over the 20-year-old Australian.And last night, in a scene reminiscent of something out of "Raiders of the Lost Ark," where Indiana Jones gets tired of watching some bad guy demonstrate his sword skills and simply shoots him, Sampras got his first break on Philippoussis' second service game and galloped away into the night, 6-3, 6-3, 6-4.The final game was all anyone needed to know about this match.
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By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 26, 2000
WIMBLEDON, England - Forget Wimbledon's whiners. Ignore the championship pretenders. Until further notice, Wimbledon is running on Pete Sampras time. Tennis' grass-court king opens defense of his Wimbledon crown on Centre Court today against Jiri Vanek, beginning a march that he hopes will lead to a seventh men's championship and record 13th Grand Slam trophy. When it comes to making tennis history, Sampras adamantly refuses to be rushed. "I don't look at the record as something I want to get over with," he said last week during final preparations for a Wimbledon campaign that could take him past Australia's Roy Emerson as the all-time Grand Slam king.
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By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 6, 1997
WIMBLEDON, England -- This is between Pete Sampras and history.Today, Sampras faces Cedric Pioline of France in the men's final at Wimbledon. And he aims for greatness, trying to become the first American man to win four Wimbledon singles titles.John McEnroe couldn't do it. Neither could Jimmy Connors.But here's Sampras, all grace and grit, at the height of his game, and still, there is a sense that fans don't care much.Around Wimbledon, he earns polite applause.Back home in America, he gets lost in a galaxy of big-time stars.
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By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Staff Writer | September 8, 1992
NEW YORK -- Pete Sampras. Remember him? Once, he was the future of American tennis, the 17-year-old who smiled a lot, said all the right things and won the 1990 U.S. Open with 100 aces.Then he had trouble adjusting to life in the tennis fast-lane. He played too often for too much money, and forgot how to win the only titles that count for something more than cash -- the Grand Slams.But Sampras is back at the Open, older, wiser and definitely a factor to win another title.Yesterday, he won a second straight five-set match, beating Guy Forget, of France, 6-3, 1-6, 1-6, 6-4, 6-3.The victory helped Sampras erase an awful memory, his 1991 Davis Cup collapse against Forget in Lyons, France.
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By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 5, 1997
WIMBLEDON, England -- The good news for Cedric Pioline is he advanced to the Wimbledon final yesterday.The bad news is, so did Pete Sampras.Pioline, of France, sent Michael Stich, of Germany, into retirement, winning a taut, terrific semifinal, 6-7 (2-7), 6-2, 6-1, 5-7, 6-4.In an earlier match, Sampras, the No. 1 seed, played like a man on a mission, overwhelming Todd Woodbridge, of Australia, 6-2, 6-1, 7-6 (7-3).In tomorrow's final at Centre Court, Sampras will aim to become the first American man to win four Wimbledon singles titles.
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By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Staff Writer | July 4, 1993
WIMBLEDON, England -- It is out with the old and in with the new this Fourth of July on Wimbledon's Centre Court.The past champions have been dispatched, and in their places stand two Americans, Pete Sampras and Jim Courier, the top two players in the world.Each is seeking to fulfill a childhood dream and win his first Wimbledon title. And each brings a big heart and big serve to the task.The only question is, will this matchup be a Yankee Doodle Dandy or Boredom on the Fourth of July?The serve is the key to Wimbledon glory.
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