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December 22, 2009
Mexico City lawmakers on Monday made the city the first in Latin America to legalize same-sex marriage, a change that will give homosexual couples more rights, including allowing them to adopt children. The bill passed the capital's local assembly 39-20 to the cheers of supporters who yelled: "Yes, we could! Yes, we could!" Mexico City's left-led assembly has made several decisions unpopular elsewhere in this deeply Roman Catholic country, including legalizing abortion in the first 12 weeks of pregnancy.
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By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2014
The nation's largest lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender civil rights organization has listed U.S. Rep. Andy Harris -- a Baltimore County Republican -- among the nation's "most anti-equality members of Congress. " The Human Rights Campaign said Tuesday that Harris made its new "Hall of Shame" list of 19 legislators nationwide for having "gone out of his way to sponsor nearly every anti-LGBT bill introduced in the House" since he arrived there in 2010. The list, which also includes high-profile legislators such as Rep. Michele Bachmann (R-MN)
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NEWS
By Annie Linskey | annie.linskey@baltsun.com | January 28, 2010
Advocates of same-sex marriage in Maryland say they don't anticipate any big victories in the State House this year, despite the recent adoption of more permissive laws in the District of Columbia, New Hampshire and elsewhere. Instead, proponents of a broader definition of marriage are thinking long-term. For the first time, they are launching a fundraising and lobbying effort to target individual state legislators who they say are unfriendly to their cause. Still, the issue promises to generate lots of debate in Annapolis over the next three months.
NEWS
October 6, 2014
Marriage equality took one of its biggest leaps forward today without anything happening at all. By deciding not to hear any of the same-sex marriage cases appealed to it, the Supreme Court immediately voided bans on gay marriage in five more states - Utah, Oklahoma, Virginia, Indiana and Wisconsin - and likely did so in six others that are part of the same appellate circuits. It was the largest number of states to realize marriage equality on one day, topping the three (including Maryland)
NEWS
By Shauna Miller and Capital News Service | March 29, 2010
When Attorney General Douglas Gansler issued his February opinion recognizing same-sex marriages from out of state, it made Maryland the next state to watch on gay marriage. But instead of using the opinion to launch a renewed effort to legalize gay marriage in Maryland, advocates are taking a different, counterintuitive tack: Stalling. That's because a referendum is likely to follow passage of any new marriage law, and voters have not favored gay marriage in states where a popular vote was held.
NEWS
By Keith L. Alexander and Ann E. Marimow and The Washington Post | March 4, 2010
Just sitting down at a desk at the marriage bureau at D.C. Superior Court on Wednesday was too much for Angelisa Young. She cried so hard that she eventually had to bury her face in her fiancee's chest. About a half-hour later, Young and her partner, Sinjoyla Townsend, who met 13 years ago in a constitutional law class at the University of the District of Columbia, became the first same-sex couple to apply to be married in the district as the city officially joined five states in allowing gay marriage.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | February 20, 2008
Societies that are tolerant, free and diverse tend to be richer and happier than societies that aren't. Maryland has shown this for decades. Now is the time to extend the legacy by legalizing same-sex marriage. The move would beam welcome signals not just to gays and lesbians but to all members of the young "creative class" who represent the economic and social future. Not coincidentally, it's the right thing to do. More and more research shows how inextricably linked tolerance and prosperity really are. No religion, race or sexual orientation has a monopoly on talent.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 25, 2006
BOSTON -- Gov. Mitt Romney filed a lawsuit yesterday asking the state's highest court to order the Legislature to vote on a constitutional amendment banning same-sex marriage or to place it on the 2008 ballot if lawmakers do not tackle it. The Legislature voted 109-87 on Nov. 9 to recess a constitutional convention before the measure was taken up, which appeared to kill it. The convention was recessed until Jan. 2, the last day of the legislative session....
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman | February 29, 2008
More than a dozen state lawmakers testified yesterday in favor of legalizing same-sex marriage in Maryland, an unusual show of legislative support even as it is unclear if proponents will be able to muster the votes for passage this year. The House Judiciary Committee also heard bills that would establish civil unions or domestic partnerships and a bill to put a constitutional amendment outlawing same-sex marriage on the November ballot. "You don't have to like us," Del. Heather R. Mizeur, who is openly gay, testified.
NEWS
By RONA MARECH and RONA MARECH,SUN REPORTER | October 14, 2005
The Bible came out, the rainbow pin went on, rhetorical swords were sharpened, and mutual respect was declared. Despite the passionate presentations, few of the approximately 160 attendees seemed swayed at this week's debate in Columbia about same-sex marriage. But participants agreed that such public discussions are critical with the definition of marriage in Maryland at stake. The state legislature is likely to return to the issue of gay rights when it reconvenes, and the Baltimore Circuit Court is due to issue a decision soon in a closely watched case that will determine whether a 1972 state law prohibiting gay men and lesbians from marrying violates the state constitution.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
The U.S. Supreme Court is meeting on Monday for the first time since June, and could make a decision to hear a new same-sex marriage case. On the justices' agenda for the closed-door conference are appeals to cases in Indiana, Oklahoma, Utah, Virginia and Wisconsin, won by gay couples that favor a Supreme Court decision on their lower court victories. Four out of nine justices would have to vote to take up any particular case , and they are under no obligation to do so and could hold off on deciding whether to consider one of the cases until a later conference.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2014
A federal judge in Washington has dismissed the high-profile discrimination lawsuit of a Gallaudet University official who claimed she was unfairly demoted for signing a petition to put Maryland's same-sex marriage law to referendum. U.S. District Judge James E. Boasberg ruled April 14 that Angela McCaskill, Gallaudet's former chief diversity officer, had failed to show she had been discriminated against under the D.C. Human Right's Act -- whether for her religion, political beliefs or identity as a straight woman -- or that the university had acted negligently.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2014
Johns Hopkins University will bestow an honorary degree next month on Edith "Edie" Windsor, the woman who successfully challenged the constitutionality of the federal law banning same-sex marriage. Windsor's attorney in last year's historic U.S. Supreme Court victory, Roberta Kaplan, will also receive an honorary degree at the May 22 commencement ceremony on the university's Homewood campus. The two women, lauded as heroes of the gay rights movement, are two of seven "distinguished achievers" being honored by Hopkins.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2014
That pesky question of whether marriage is a fundamental right under the Constitution? It's back. Or, more to the point, same-sex marriage advocates are getting closer than ever to getting the Supreme Court to actually answer it once and for all. The "fundamental" question has become a laser focus of advocates since the Supreme Court skirted around it in two rulings last summer, one allowing gay marriage to move forward in California and another...
FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2014
The generation gap that many credit with moving the needle on same-sex marriage apparently crosses party lines. According to a new Pew Research Center survey , 61 percent of Republicans under 30 -- a clear majority -- favor allowing same-sex marriage, while 35 percent oppose it. That's a marked difference from both their older counterparts and the party at large. Only 27 percent of Republicans over 50 support allowing gay and lesbian couples to wed, according to the poll, compared with 39 percent approval from Republicans overall.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector and Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2014
Maryland Attorney General Doug Gansler said Friday that same-sex marriages performed in Utah -- but thrown into question there amid a court battle -- will be recognized in Maryland. "It is an affront to the idea of basic human rights that the battle for full marriage equality in this country remains in headlines and courtrooms,” Gansler said. In an interview, Gansler predicted that controversy in Utah could put the constitutionality of gay marriage to rest. "This might be the issue, then, that answers the question for everybody," he said.  Utah temporarily became the 18th state in the country to legalize same-sex marriages on Dec. 20 after U.S. District Judge Robert Shelby ruled the state's ban on such marriages was unconstitutional.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH MEHREN and ELIZABETH MEHREN,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 22, 2006
BOSTON -- The couple who lent their name to the lawsuit that legalized same-sex marriage in Massachusetts have separated, a family spokesman confirmed yesterday. Julie Goodridge, 49, and Hillary Goodridge, 50, were married May 17, 2004, the first day that same-sex couples were permitted to wed in Massachusetts under the terms of Goodridge v. Department of Public Health. The landmark 4-3 decision by this state's Supreme Judicial Court revolutionized the concept of marriage as Massachusetts became the first state to extend marriage rights to same-sex couples.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,Sun reporter | December 1, 2006
Just days before Maryland's highest court hears arguments over whether the state's gay men and lesbians have the right to wed, a group of sociologists, psychologists and child-welfare advocates spoke out yesterday in support of same-sex marriage. They said they based their support on years of scientific research concluding that gays and lesbians can be as effective parents as heterosexuals and that the children of gay parents develop just as well as children of opposite-sex couples. "There is absolutely no scientific basis for legal discrimination against gay and lesbian couples and families regarding their rights to parent and marry as everyone else does," said Ruth Fassinger, a psychology professor at the University of Maryland during a news conference held at the Baltimore headquarters of the Maryland chapter of the National Association of Social Workers.
FEATURES
By Michael Gold, The Baltimore Sun | January 6, 2014
The Supreme Court halted same-sex marriages in Utah on Monday in the wake of a federal judge's ruling that would have made Utah the 18th state to allow same-sex marriages. The court's unsigned order puts same-sex weddings on hold in Utah pending the final appeal of a Dec. 20 decision made by U.S. District Court Judge Robert Shelby. Shelby found Utah's same-sex marriage ban to be unconstitutional and mandated an immediate end to Utah's law barring same-sex marriage. Same-sex couples began to get marriage licenses shortly thereafter.
FEATURES
By Michael Gold, The Baltmiore Sun | December 23, 2013
Ohio must recognize same-sex marriages held in other states on Ohio death certificates, a federal judge decided Monday in a case sparked by an Ohio couple's July wedding on the BWI Thurgood Marshall Airport tarmac. "The right to remain married ... is a fundamental liberty interest appropriately protected by the Due Process Clause of the United States Constitution," U.S. District Judge Timothy Black wrote in a narrow ruling that does not overturn Ohio's same-sex marriage ban. In July, Black initially issued a temporary injunction for John Arthur and Jim Obergefell, requiring state officials to recognize the couple's Maryland marriage on Arthur's death certificate.
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