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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 2, 2003
SAMARRA, Iraq - U.S. commanders vowed yesterday that the killing of as many as 54 insurgents in this central Iraqi town would serve as a lesson to those fighting the United States, but Iraqis disputed the death toll and said anger against the United States would only rise. Accounts of a three-hour battle fought in the alleys and streets of Samarra on Sunday diverged radically, with Iraqis claiming only eight people had been killed, several of them civilians. At the morgue, Adnan Sahib Dafar, 52, an ambulance driver, pointed to a dead woman on a steel tray.
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NEWS
By Tina Susman and Tina Susman,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 19, 2007
BAGHDAD -- U.S.-led forces did battle with Shiite Muslim militiamen in southern Iraq yesterday and killed at least 20 suspected fighters, the military said, while car bombs and other violence left at least 40 people dead in the capital following days of calm brought on by a curfew. Violence also erupted again in Samarra, north of Baghdad, the site of a bombing last Wednesday that targeted a revered Shiite shrine and prompted officials to clamp curfews on Baghdad and Samarra. Police said four people died when a suicide bomber rammed his car into a Samarra school that was being used to house police officers.
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NEWS
By Colin McMahon and Colin McMahon,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 2, 2004
BAGHDAD, Iraq - Acting on a vow to take back what a senior Iraqi leader called an "outlaw city," U.S. and Iraqi forces seized large parts of Samarra yesterday in fighting that reportedly killed at least 100 guerrillas. An American soldier was killed and at least four were wounded, the military said, in battles that began on the city's outskirts and jumped from street to street as the Iraqi National Guard and U.S. armor and warplanes chased insurgents. About 80 percent of the city was in U.S. and Iraqi hands by evening, the Iraqi Interior Ministry said.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service. | June 14, 2007
BAGHDAD -- Two explosions that appeared to have been set by Sunni extremists with al-Qaida links toppled yesterday the twin golden minarets that were most of what remained of one of Iraq's most revered Shiite shrines after a devastating bombing by al-Qaida last year. The bombing 16 months ago proved a watershed, engulfing the country in a wave of sectarian killing that pushed Sunnis and Shiites toward civil war. With American and Iraqi forces unable to restrain soaring levels of killing that saw as many as 3,000 Iraqi civilians dying every month by the end of last year, President Bush ordered nearly 30,000 additional American troops deployed here in a so-called surge aimed at pulling the country back from the abyss.
NEWS
By Tina Susman and Tina Susman,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 19, 2007
BAGHDAD -- U.S.-led forces did battle with Shiite Muslim militiamen in southern Iraq yesterday and killed at least 20 suspected fighters, the military said, while car bombs and other violence left at least 40 people dead in the capital following days of calm brought on by a curfew. Violence also erupted again in Samarra, north of Baghdad, the site of a bombing last Wednesday that targeted a revered Shiite shrine and prompted officials to clamp curfews on Baghdad and Samarra. Police said four people died when a suicide bomber rammed his car into a Samarra school that was being used to house police officers.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 30, 2003
SAMARRA, Iraq - Facing continued attacks on U.S. soldiers and a growing number of confrontations between Americans and Iraqis, U.S. military officials said yesterday that they would begin sending more soldiers on patrols in areas where anti-American sentiment is rising. The decision came as U.S. officials debate whether the U.S. military force in Iraq needs to be larger and to remain in Iraq longer than Pentagon officials had anticipated and whether the U.S. civil administration in Iraq should be overhauled for the second time in a month.
NEWS
By Louise Roug and Louise Roug,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 9, 2006
CAMP SPEICHER, IRAQ -- Sgt. Chris Dyer, 24, had just returned to Iraq from his home in Pinson, Tenn. It had taken him three days to get back to this airfield near Tikrit - via Atlanta, Amsterdam and Kuwait. In that time, Americans had gone to the polls, the House of Representatives had changed hands, and his boss, Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld, had resigned. "Wow," said Dyer, momentarily speechless as he read the headlines on a laptop. Sitting on a cot across the room, Spc. Jonathan Yoder also expressed surprise.
NEWS
October 4, 2004
NATIONAL Tourists camp out near volcano Tourists camped out along park roads, hoping to catch a glimpse of the seething Mount St. Helens without being overcome by ash and smoke as scientists warned that an eruption appeared imminent yesterday. The mountain's alert was raised to Level 3, the highest possible, after a volcanic tremor was detected Saturday. However, scientists said they do not expect anything close to the devastation of the 1980 explosion. [Page 3a] Rice defends Hussein theory National security adviser Condoleezza Rice yesterday defended her characterization of Saddam Hussein's nuclear capabilities in the months before the Iraq invasion, even as a published report said government experts had cast doubt at the time.
NEWS
By Thomas S. Mulligan and Suhail Ahmed and Thomas S. Mulligan and Suhail Ahmed,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 3, 2004
AD DAWR, Iraq - As U.S.-led forces consolidated their control over rebellious Samarra yesterday, humanitarian officials described a hellish scene in the city after a two-day offensive by 5,000 U.S. and Iraqi troops. The morgue in Samarra's main hospital was overflowing, requiring corpses to be laid on the floor in an unrefrigerated hall, said Nura abid Bakir, director of the Red Crescent branch in the northern province of Salahuddin, where Samarra is located. She cited reports from Red Crescent volunteers who had visited the hospital.
NEWS
By Garrett Therolf and Garrett Therolf,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 11, 2007
BAGHDAD -- U.S. and Iraqi troops have imposed a strict security crackdown in Samarra, a stronghold of the Sunni insurgency, prompting residents to complain that basic necessities such as drinking water have not reached the city for seven days. The restrictions follow incidents last week when militants linked to al-Qaida in Iraq flew black flags in the streets of the city and a suicide car bomber rammed a car into the police headquarters Sunday, killing 12 officers, including the police chief, Col. Jaleel Nahi Hassoun, and disabling the city's water system.
NEWS
By Garrett Therolf and Garrett Therolf,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 11, 2007
BAGHDAD -- U.S. and Iraqi troops have imposed a strict security crackdown in Samarra, a stronghold of the Sunni insurgency, prompting residents to complain that basic necessities such as drinking water have not reached the city for seven days. The restrictions follow incidents last week when militants linked to al-Qaida in Iraq flew black flags in the streets of the city and a suicide car bomber rammed a car into the police headquarters Sunday, killing 12 officers, including the police chief, Col. Jaleel Nahi Hassoun, and disabling the city's water system.
NEWS
By Louise Roug and Louise Roug,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 9, 2006
CAMP SPEICHER, IRAQ -- Sgt. Chris Dyer, 24, had just returned to Iraq from his home in Pinson, Tenn. It had taken him three days to get back to this airfield near Tikrit - via Atlanta, Amsterdam and Kuwait. In that time, Americans had gone to the polls, the House of Representatives had changed hands, and his boss, Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld, had resigned. "Wow," said Dyer, momentarily speechless as he read the headlines on a laptop. Sitting on a cot across the room, Spc. Jonathan Yoder also expressed surprise.
NEWS
By Caesar Ahmed and Raheem Salman and Caesar Ahmed and Raheem Salman,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 30, 2005
BAGHDAD, Iraq - Gunmen stormed the former insurgent bastion of Samarra in northern Iraq yesterday, killing at least two elite police commandos and injuring as many as six. Witnesses said armed men in as many as 10 civilian cars marauded through Samarra, a historic Tigris River shrine city filled with archaeological treasures. They attacked a building used by security forces with mortars and rocket-propelled-grenade launchers. The gunmen then surrounded the hospital and began shooting at it until Iraqi and U.S. reinforcements arrived, witnesses said.
NEWS
By Edmund Sanders and Edmund Sanders,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 9, 2004
BAGHDAD, Iraq - Two months after U.S. forces declared that they had pacified Samarra, the restive city erupted in violence again with a string of attacks yesterday that killed at least four Iraqis, damaged a U.S. military convoy and caused the local police chief to announce his resignation. The strikes followed a month of car bombs, ambushes and bloodshed in the Iraqi city that shook residents, closed businesses and disrupted voter registration efforts. In announcing his resignation over a mosque loudspeaker, Maj. Gen. Talib Shamil Samarriee said insurgents had attacked his home and tried to kidnap his son at school, where teachers hid the boy to save him. Gunmen attacked the chief's car. "I came according to the wish of the sons of the city in order to serve this city and to present any assistance I can," the police commander said.
NEWS
By Alex Rodriguez and Alex Rodriguez,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 7, 2004
BAGHDAD, Iraq - Militants unleashed a series of car bomb attacks and ambushes in the city of Samarra and across central Iraq yesterday, killing about 30 people, wounding nearly two dozen Americans and undercutting U.S. claims that rebel violence in the region had been brought under control. In Samarra, attacks targeted police stations and a U.S.-Iraqi military convoy and occurred within minutes of one another, suggesting they may have been part of a coordinated assault. Most of the 29 dead were Iraqi police officers.
NEWS
October 4, 2004
NATIONAL Tourists camp out near volcano Tourists camped out along park roads, hoping to catch a glimpse of the seething Mount St. Helens without being overcome by ash and smoke as scientists warned that an eruption appeared imminent yesterday. The mountain's alert was raised to Level 3, the highest possible, after a volcanic tremor was detected Saturday. However, scientists said they do not expect anything close to the devastation of the 1980 explosion. [Page 3a] Rice defends Hussein theory National security adviser Condoleezza Rice yesterday defended her characterization of Saddam Hussein's nuclear capabilities in the months before the Iraq invasion, even as a published report said government experts had cast doubt at the time.
NEWS
By Edmund Sanders and Edmund Sanders,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 9, 2004
BAGHDAD, Iraq - Two months after U.S. forces declared that they had pacified Samarra, the restive city erupted in violence again with a string of attacks yesterday that killed at least four Iraqis, damaged a U.S. military convoy and caused the local police chief to announce his resignation. The strikes followed a month of car bombs, ambushes and bloodshed in the Iraqi city that shook residents, closed businesses and disrupted voter registration efforts. In announcing his resignation over a mosque loudspeaker, Maj. Gen. Talib Shamil Samarriee said insurgents had attacked his home and tried to kidnap his son at school, where teachers hid the boy to save him. Gunmen attacked the chief's car. "I came according to the wish of the sons of the city in order to serve this city and to present any assistance I can," the police commander said.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service. | June 14, 2007
BAGHDAD -- Two explosions that appeared to have been set by Sunni extremists with al-Qaida links toppled yesterday the twin golden minarets that were most of what remained of one of Iraq's most revered Shiite shrines after a devastating bombing by al-Qaida last year. The bombing 16 months ago proved a watershed, engulfing the country in a wave of sectarian killing that pushed Sunnis and Shiites toward civil war. With American and Iraqi forces unable to restrain soaring levels of killing that saw as many as 3,000 Iraqi civilians dying every month by the end of last year, President Bush ordered nearly 30,000 additional American troops deployed here in a so-called surge aimed at pulling the country back from the abyss.
NEWS
By Thomas S. Mulligan and Edmund Sanders and Thomas S. Mulligan and Edmund Sanders,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 4, 2004
SAMARRA, Iraq - U.S. military officials said yesterday that they had regained control over this insurgent stronghold 60 miles north of Baghdad, recording a significant victory in their bid to recapture rebel-held areas in Iraq before the January election. As residents of Samarra ventured out for the first time in three days, U.S. forces launched predawn airstrikes on Fallujah, another Sunni Triangle city that has become a "no-go zone" for U.S. and Iraqi troops. The U.S. military said it killed several militants and destroyed a large cache of ammunition.
NEWS
By Thomas S. Mulligan and Suhail Ahmed and Thomas S. Mulligan and Suhail Ahmed,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 3, 2004
AD DAWR, Iraq - As U.S.-led forces consolidated their control over rebellious Samarra yesterday, humanitarian officials described a hellish scene in the city after a two-day offensive by 5,000 U.S. and Iraqi troops. The morgue in Samarra's main hospital was overflowing, requiring corpses to be laid on the floor in an unrefrigerated hall, said Nura abid Bakir, director of the Red Crescent branch in the northern province of Salahuddin, where Samarra is located. She cited reports from Red Crescent volunteers who had visited the hospital.
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