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Sam Walton

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NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2012
We're trying to plug a few gaps in our electronic dictionary, and one editor has suggested that we make sure that Walmart  is on the list of objectionable words to be flagged, because the  Associated Press Stylebook  specifies Wal-Mart .  I pointed out that  Wal-Mart Stores Inc. , the listing in the stylebook, is the company's corporate name. But its online name is Walmart.com , and Walmart is now how it names individual stores. That, of course, would mean making judgments in context rather than relying reflexively on AP.  Another editor responded, quoting this exchange from the stylebook's online question-and-answer feature:  Q. Wal-Mart or Walmart?
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NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | November 28, 2012
We're officially into Christmas buying season -- when American consumers determine the fate of American retailers and, indirectly, the American economy. What's often forgotten is that consumers are also workers, and if their pay doesn't keep up, they can't keep the economy going. A half-century ago, America's largest private-sector employer was General Motors, whose full-time workers earned an average hourly wage of around $50, in today's dollars, including health and pension benefits.
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NEWS
April 8, 1992
"Anyone willing to work hard, study the business and apply the best principals can do well," Sam Walton once observed. "We learned from everyone else's book and added a few pages of our own."Those few pages profoundly shaped the course of American retailing. Sam Walton, 74, who died Sunday in Little Rock, rewrote the rules of retailing, fusing discount pricing on brand-name goods and small-town locations into an extraordinarily successful merchandising story. His "low prices always" slogan and habit of calling employees "associates" have become standards in the industry.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2012
We're trying to plug a few gaps in our electronic dictionary, and one editor has suggested that we make sure that Walmart  is on the list of objectionable words to be flagged, because the  Associated Press Stylebook  specifies Wal-Mart .  I pointed out that  Wal-Mart Stores Inc. , the listing in the stylebook, is the company's corporate name. But its online name is Walmart.com , and Walmart is now how it names individual stores. That, of course, would mean making judgments in context rather than relying reflexively on AP.  Another editor responded, quoting this exchange from the stylebook's online question-and-answer feature:  Q. Wal-Mart or Walmart?
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 6, 1992
Sam Walton, the founder of Wal-Mart Stores Inc. and one of the most successful merchants of his time, died yesterday at the University of Arkansas Medical Sciences Hospital in Little Rock. He was 74.A spokeswoman at the hospital, where Mr. Walton was admitted a week ago, would not disclose the cause of death, nor would a Wal-Mart spokeswoman.Mr. Walton, declared the wealthiest man in America by Forbes magazine in 1985, had long struggled against two types of cancer, hairy-cell leukemia, which weakens the immune system by attacking white blood cells, and a bone-marrow cancer called multiple myeloma.
FEATURES
By Jeff Danziger and Jeff Danziger,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 25, 1998
"In Sam We Trust (The Untold Story of Sam Walton and How Wal-Mart is Devouring America)," by Bob Ortega. New York Times Business. 384 pages. $35.95.Some years ago when Wal-Mart attacked Vermont, I did a cartoon showing the inside of one of its soulless stores with a sign saying the State of Vermont was now in Aisle 32. One of the editors in Rutland wondered if we would get sued, but after reading Mr. Ortega's book, I'm sure Walton would have considered the cartoon high praise.This is a fine business history, from Walton's first Ben Franklin store, then his Wal-Marts across the South, and finally to his chain of 2,200 stores and more than 450,000 employees.
NEWS
By John Schmeltzer and John Schmeltzer,Chicago Tribune | August 2, 1992
SAM WALTON: MADE IN AMERICA, MY STORY. Sam Walton with John Huey. Doubleday.262 pages. $22.50.SAM WALTON: THE INSIDE STORY OF AMERICA'S RICHEST MAN. Vance H. Trimble. Dutton.308 pages. $19.95. "Hello, friends, I'm Sam Walton, founder and chairman of Wal-Mart Stores."No prelude, no justification, just hello. The folksy, easy-reading tone of the autobiography of Sam Walton, a down-home good old boy, is established in the first sentence of the book's foreword.From that point on, Walton and co-author John Huey take readers through the amazing story of the rise of the nation's premier retail company and the equally amazing tale of the nation's wealthiest individual.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 16, 2002
BENTONVILLE, Ark. - With an oceanic parking lot and the same sort of sign that marks its Supercenter up the street, Wal-Mart's headquarters looks more like a giant discount store than the home of the largest corporation in the world. Tucked away in this remote corner of northwest Arkansas, Wal-Mart has in just 40 years combined ruthless efficiency and relentless expansion to surpass the giants of business, General Motors and Exxon-Mobil. This spring, it was listed at the top of the Fortune 500. But, if the company's literature is to be believed, the soul of Wal-Mart's success lies not in the legion of MBAs at corporate headquarters but in an old five-and-dime on the courthouse square where Sam Walton first got the idea that revolutionized retailing and forever changed life in rural America.
NEWS
By DAVID N. LABAND | April 15, 1992
Clemson, South Carolina. -- Plaudits showered upon Sam Walton at his death. President Bush, who had presented him the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian honor, hailed him as ''an American original who embodied the entrepreneurial spirit and epitomized the American dream.'' Mr. Walton was not lionized merely because of his entrepreneurial spirit; millions of Americans have entrepreneurial spirit. What made Sam Walton unique was his spectacular success as a (dare we say greedy?
BUSINESS
By Gerald Graham and Gerald Graham,Knight-Ridder | March 25, 1991
Wal-Mart, far and away the best performing retailer in the nation by all standards, will likely reach annual sales of $96 billion by the year 2000.Without a doubt Sam Walton has one of the most outstanding performance records of any leader. And all of this grew from Walton's first store, a Ben Franklin, which ended 1945 with sales of $80,000.Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter Vance Trimble, in his unauthorized biography "Sam Walton," records the major reasons for Walton's success:* Sincere customer appreciation.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 16, 2002
BENTONVILLE, Ark. - With an oceanic parking lot and the same sort of sign that marks its Supercenter up the street, Wal-Mart's headquarters looks more like a giant discount store than the home of the largest corporation in the world. Tucked away in this remote corner of northwest Arkansas, Wal-Mart has in just 40 years combined ruthless efficiency and relentless expansion to surpass the giants of business, General Motors and Exxon-Mobil. This spring, it was listed at the top of the Fortune 500. But, if the company's literature is to be believed, the soul of Wal-Mart's success lies not in the legion of MBAs at corporate headquarters but in an old five-and-dime on the courthouse square where Sam Walton first got the idea that revolutionized retailing and forever changed life in rural America.
FEATURES
By Jeff Danziger and Jeff Danziger,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 25, 1998
"In Sam We Trust (The Untold Story of Sam Walton and How Wal-Mart is Devouring America)," by Bob Ortega. New York Times Business. 384 pages. $35.95.Some years ago when Wal-Mart attacked Vermont, I did a cartoon showing the inside of one of its soulless stores with a sign saying the State of Vermont was now in Aisle 32. One of the editors in Rutland wondered if we would get sued, but after reading Mr. Ortega's book, I'm sure Walton would have considered the cartoon high praise.This is a fine business history, from Walton's first Ben Franklin store, then his Wal-Marts across the South, and finally to his chain of 2,200 stores and more than 450,000 employees.
NEWS
By ANDREW RATNER | July 20, 1996
AFTER A FAMILY outing this summer to Fallingwater, the exquisite home designed by Frank Lloyd Wright that's been rTC called the ''best American building of the last 125 years,'' I left with mixed emotions.Perched atop a waterfall in southwest Pennsylvania, the structure is a masterpiece. It inspires awe, especially when one considers that Mr. Wright composed its modern lines back in the 1930s. The historic landmark is well worth the four-hour trip for Baltimoreans.But Fallingwater wasn't built for living.
FEATURES
By Christine Dugas and Christine Dugas,Newsday | July 9, 1993
Tom and Lorrie Lemke, a young San Diego couple, recently appeared on the Oprah Winfrey show to discuss their thrifty lifestyle. As Mr. Lemke enthusiastically described clipping coupons, making pasta at home, and hunting for early bird restaurant specials, the audience snickered.But the group wasn't laughing when the Lemkes, parents of two small children, said they have managed to save $50,000 in the past four years."Some people think we're nickel-and-diming it, but those nickels and dimes are going to add up and going to help put our kids through college," Mr. Lemke said.
BUSINESS
By TOM PETERS | April 26, 1993
You've sweated blood on a 45-minute presentation for your division general manager. I'd wager he responds in one of two ways:Scenario No. 1: "That's a really interesting analysis. The marketing research folks, especially Sally Another-Analysis, could give you a hand in fleshing it out. Oh, yeah, the cost thing just seems too low to me. Marty Nitpick, in finance, is a genius with stuff like that. I'll tell him to expect your call."Why don't you schedule an hour on my calendar, for another look, in a couple weeks.
NEWS
October 14, 1992
Forget all the fancy new retailing concepts -- hypermarts, category killers and discount stores. The idea that seems to have really filled a merchandising void in Carroll County is the old-fashioned Pennsylvania Dutch Farmers Market that opened last Friday in Crossroads Shopping Center in Westminster.At noon, in the rain no less, there wasn't a parking space to be found. Hungry people were waiting 20 minutes for a hot roast pork, fresh ham or turkey sandwiches at the Pennsylvania Smokehouse stand.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder | December 27, 1991
JODIE FOSTER, cited for her role as a psycho-stalking cop in the movie "Silence of the Lambs," plus her film directorial debut in "Little Man Tate," was picked as Entertainer of the Year in this week's Entertainment Weekly."
NEWS
October 14, 1992
Forget all the fancy new retailing concepts -- hypermarts, category killers and discount stores. The idea that seems to have really filled a merchandising void in Carroll County is the old-fashioned Pennsylvania Dutch Farmers Market that opened last Friday in Crossroads Shopping Center in Westminster.At noon, in the rain no less, there wasn't a parking space to be found. Hungry people were waiting 20 minutes for a hot roast pork, fresh ham or turkey sandwiches at the Pennsylvania Smokehouse stand.
NEWS
By John Schmeltzer and John Schmeltzer,Chicago Tribune | August 2, 1992
SAM WALTON: MADE IN AMERICA, MY STORY. Sam Walton with John Huey. Doubleday.262 pages. $22.50.SAM WALTON: THE INSIDE STORY OF AMERICA'S RICHEST MAN. Vance H. Trimble. Dutton.308 pages. $19.95. "Hello, friends, I'm Sam Walton, founder and chairman of Wal-Mart Stores."No prelude, no justification, just hello. The folksy, easy-reading tone of the autobiography of Sam Walton, a down-home good old boy, is established in the first sentence of the book's foreword.From that point on, Walton and co-author John Huey take readers through the amazing story of the rise of the nation's premier retail company and the equally amazing tale of the nation's wealthiest individual.
NEWS
By DAVID N. LABAND | April 15, 1992
Clemson, South Carolina. -- Plaudits showered upon Sam Walton at his death. President Bush, who had presented him the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian honor, hailed him as ''an American original who embodied the entrepreneurial spirit and epitomized the American dream.'' Mr. Walton was not lionized merely because of his entrepreneurial spirit; millions of Americans have entrepreneurial spirit. What made Sam Walton unique was his spectacular success as a (dare we say greedy?
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