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By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | July 18, 2000
ST. ANDREWS, Scotland - His eyesight is failing, the result of a degenerative condition that prevents him from seeing any shot farther than 50 yards. His legs are wobbly, the result of taking medication more than a year ago that caused them to swell to more than twice their normal size. Sam Snead turned 88 on May 27 , yet remains one of golf's most irascible and irreplaceable figures. He still has nearly the same ability to swing, and zing. The man many consider the most naturally gifted player in history, the man whose 81 victories spread over six decades are PGA Tour records, has returned to the Old Course.
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By BILL ORDINE | February 26, 2008
As if it were a tale written by Damon Runyon, the bookend winners in the eight-horse parlay were named Isn't that Lucky and A Dream Come True, according to a wire service story. A spokesman for the famous English bookmaker shop, William Hill, said the new millionaire, Fred Craggs, 60, from Yorkshire, was unaware that he had just won a king's ransom when he showed up later to make more bets. In contrast, Tiger Woods on Sunday showed what it means to be so good as to leave absolutely nothing to chance.
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SPORTS
April 7, 1994
AUGUSTA, Ga. -- Old champions Gene Sarazen (92), Byron Nelson (82) and Sam Snead (82) were the honorary starters today in the 58th Masters golf tournament. A chilly north wind, gusting to about 25 mph, was blowing into their faces.Former champions Tommy Aaron and Gay Brewer were the first two in the competing field to tee off.* Earlier coverage, Page 9D.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | August 16, 2000
LOUISVILLE, Ky. - At a clinic of PGA champions yesterday at the Valhalla Golf Club, Tiger Woods took out his driver and put on a one-man show. It didn't matter that he wasn't even the closing act - Jack Nicklaus was - or who had gone before him on the practice range stage. On command from master of ceremonies and former PGA champion Lanny Wadkins, Woods hit the kind of low burners that helped him win last month's British Open at St. Andrews, the perfectly shaped draws that led to his 15-stroke victory at Pebble Beach in this year's U.S. Open and the high fades that could bring him another major title here in the 82nd PGA Championship.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | February 26, 2008
As if it were a tale written by Damon Runyon, the bookend winners in the eight-horse parlay were named Isn't that Lucky and A Dream Come True, according to a wire service story. A spokesman for the famous English bookmaker shop, William Hill, said the new millionaire, Fred Craggs, 60, from Yorkshire, was unaware that he had just won a king's ransom when he showed up later to make more bets. In contrast, Tiger Woods on Sunday showed what it means to be so good as to leave absolutely nothing to chance.
SPORTS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 26, 1997
Ben Hogan, the flinty-eyed Texan who was perhaps the most creative shotmaker in the history of golf and one of its most accomplished players, died yesterday morning in Fort Worth, Texas. He was 84.He had been in poor health since undergoing surgery for colon cancer two years ago, then contracting bronchitis soon afterward, according to Valerie Hogan, his wife of 62 years. She said he entered All Saints Hospital in Fort Worth on Thursday morning after suffering a fall at home.Although he was a very private man who preferred in recent years to remain close to his home in Westover Hills and his office at Shady Oaks Country Club, Hogan's influence on the game nonetheless was profound, and his legacy far-reaching.
SPORTS
By Fred Robledo and Fred Robledo,Los Angeles Times | March 3, 1991
A hush fell over the gallery ringing the 18th hole at Riviera Country Club in Los Angeles.Sam Snead, never noted for his putting ability, was surveying a 12-foot birdie putt he needed to catch Ben Hogan and send the 1950 Los Angeles Open into an 18-hole playoff.As he was about to stroke the ball, there was the crack of a tree branch breaking from the weight of a man, who fell.Snead backed off while the gallery laughed.Hogan preferred not to watch. He was sitting with friends in the clubhouse, listening for crowd reaction.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | July 7, 2000
George Archer spends much of his time away from the Senior PGA Tour fishing for trout near his home in Lake Tahoe, Nev. A year ago, Archer and his brother took their now-91-year-old father out with them. "It was cute, my dad caught five, I caught one and my brother caught three," recalled Archer. "My dad said, `Well, I guess I out-fished the boys.' " That's how Archer, 60, feels when he outplays those younger than him on the Senior Tour. It happened in the tour's opening tournament this year, the MasterCard Championship, where Archer won his 19th senior title.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | August 16, 2000
LOUISVILLE, Ky. - At a clinic of PGA champions yesterday at the Valhalla Golf Club, Tiger Woods took out his driver and put on a one-man show. It didn't matter that he wasn't even the closing act - Jack Nicklaus was - or who had gone before him on the practice range stage. On command from master of ceremonies and former PGA champion Lanny Wadkins, Woods hit the kind of low burners that helped him win last month's British Open at St. Andrews, the perfectly shaped draws that led to his 15-stroke victory at Pebble Beach in this year's U.S. Open and the high fades that could bring him another major title here in the 82nd PGA Championship.
SPORTS
By Ivan Maisel and Ivan Maisel,Dallas Morning News | May 26, 1991
FORT WORTH, Texas -- He is in a match he admits he can't win, which may be a first for Lanny Wadkins. He is 41 years old. The end of his PGA Tour career is three-up with three to play -- dormie, the golfing term is.Wadkins is running out of holes. Not even the man considered by his peers as the best match-play golfer in spikes can win this one.But if age is going to beat him, it had better make some birdies. Literally and figuratively, Wadkins hasn't stopped firing at the pins."The only thing that bothered me when I got to be 40 was the sense of urgency," Wadkins said.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | July 18, 2000
ST. ANDREWS, Scotland - His eyesight is failing, the result of a degenerative condition that prevents him from seeing any shot farther than 50 yards. His legs are wobbly, the result of taking medication more than a year ago that caused them to swell to more than twice their normal size. Sam Snead turned 88 on May 27 , yet remains one of golf's most irascible and irreplaceable figures. He still has nearly the same ability to swing, and zing. The man many consider the most naturally gifted player in history, the man whose 81 victories spread over six decades are PGA Tour records, has returned to the Old Course.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | July 7, 2000
George Archer spends much of his time away from the Senior PGA Tour fishing for trout near his home in Lake Tahoe, Nev. A year ago, Archer and his brother took their now-91-year-old father out with them. "It was cute, my dad caught five, I caught one and my brother caught three," recalled Archer. "My dad said, `Well, I guess I out-fished the boys.' " That's how Archer, 60, feels when he outplays those younger than him on the Senior Tour. It happened in the tour's opening tournament this year, the MasterCard Championship, where Archer won his 19th senior title.
SPORTS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 26, 1997
Ben Hogan, the flinty-eyed Texan who was perhaps the most creative shotmaker in the history of golf and one of its most accomplished players, died yesterday morning in Fort Worth, Texas. He was 84.He had been in poor health since undergoing surgery for colon cancer two years ago, then contracting bronchitis soon afterward, according to Valerie Hogan, his wife of 62 years. She said he entered All Saints Hospital in Fort Worth on Thursday morning after suffering a fall at home.Although he was a very private man who preferred in recent years to remain close to his home in Westover Hills and his office at Shady Oaks Country Club, Hogan's influence on the game nonetheless was profound, and his legacy far-reaching.
SPORTS
April 7, 1994
AUGUSTA, Ga. -- Old champions Gene Sarazen (92), Byron Nelson (82) and Sam Snead (82) were the honorary starters today in the 58th Masters golf tournament. A chilly north wind, gusting to about 25 mph, was blowing into their faces.Former champions Tommy Aaron and Gay Brewer were the first two in the competing field to tee off.* Earlier coverage, Page 9D.
SPORTS
By Ivan Maisel and Ivan Maisel,Dallas Morning News | May 26, 1991
FORT WORTH, Texas -- He is in a match he admits he can't win, which may be a first for Lanny Wadkins. He is 41 years old. The end of his PGA Tour career is three-up with three to play -- dormie, the golfing term is.Wadkins is running out of holes. Not even the man considered by his peers as the best match-play golfer in spikes can win this one.But if age is going to beat him, it had better make some birdies. Literally and figuratively, Wadkins hasn't stopped firing at the pins."The only thing that bothered me when I got to be 40 was the sense of urgency," Wadkins said.
SPORTS
By Fred Robledo and Fred Robledo,Los Angeles Times | March 3, 1991
A hush fell over the gallery ringing the 18th hole at Riviera Country Club in Los Angeles.Sam Snead, never noted for his putting ability, was surveying a 12-foot birdie putt he needed to catch Ben Hogan and send the 1950 Los Angeles Open into an 18-hole playoff.As he was about to stroke the ball, there was the crack of a tree branch breaking from the weight of a man, who fell.Snead backed off while the gallery laughed.Hogan preferred not to watch. He was sitting with friends in the clubhouse, listening for crowd reaction.
SPORTS
February 3, 1992
PEBBLE BEACH, Calif. -- The thoughts went tumbling through his mind, Mark O'Meara said, when he watched Jeff Sluman's 20-foot putt fall into the cup on the 72nd hole yesterday."
SPORTS
April 15, 1999
PGA TourMCI ClassicSite: Hilton Head Island, S.C.Schedule: Today-Sunday.Course: Harbour Town Golf Links (6,916 yards, par 71).Purse: $2.5 million.Winner's share: $450,000.TV: The Golf Channel (today, 1: 30-4 p.m.; tomorrow, 4-6: 30 p.m.) and CBS (Saturday-Sunday, 3-6 p.m.).Last year: Davis Love routed the field, winning by seven strokes over Glen Day.Last week: Jose Maria Olazabal won his second Masters by two strokes over Love. Olazabal never three-putted in the tournament.Notes: Tiger Woods makes his first career appearance at the MCI Classic.
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