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NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,Contributing Writer | April 22, 1994
The Peruvian poet Cesar Vallejo once wrote, "Something identifies you with the one who leaves you, and it is your common power to return: thus your greatest sorrow."He continued: "Something separates you from the one who remains with you, and it is your common slavery to depart: thus your meagerest rejoicing."Those quotes open the script of Sam Shepard's 1986 play, "A Lie of the Mind," to be performed at Western Maryland College beginning today.On the surface, the play deals with a married couple, with their problems and their families, who are brought into the situation.
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FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,Sun reporter | November 7, 2007
In its 17 years in Baltimore, Everyman Theatre has found a niche in spare sets, even sparer casts and a dedication to modern classics by the likes of Arthur Miller, Sam Shepard and Tennessee Williams. The company has stretched its comfort zone with its share of period pieces, but never further than today as it presents Much Ado About Nothing. It's the Everyman's first full-scale Shakespearean production, the company's coming of age. If you go Much Ado About Nothing at Everyman Theatre, 1727 N. Charles St., runs through Dec. 16. For tickets, call 410-752-2208 or go to everymantheatre.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | September 25, 2003
When Rep Stage in Columbia opens its 2003-2004 season tomorrow with Fool for Love, it will mark the reunion of a director and a kindred playwright. The director is Jackson Phippin, and the playwright is Sam Shepard. Phippin, who directed Shepard's Buried Child at the Virginia Stage Company 20 years ago, said last week, "I share the same sort of sense of theatricality that Shepard has. I like meta-theatrical events, given my past with experimental work." Phippin, who served as associate artistic director of Center Stage from 1979 until 1985, came to Baltimore in the mid-1970s with the experimental troupe KRAKEN.
NEWS
June 11, 2007
Blue traffic lights? Nowadays, the yellow light means "Pedal to the metal." It means, "No way am I catching that red light with the rest of you losers." No one seems to pay attention to that signal anymore. Maybe blue lights will get people's attention? Hey, it's worth a shot. Today baltimoresun.com/cowherd LPGA's trail of emotions Suzann Pettersen's swing coach used to work with Michelle Wie. Yesterday at the LPGA Championship, his current student finished on top, while his former student was last.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 19, 2006
Don't Come Knocking presents its audience with an intriguingly dysfunctional family, and a handful of absurdist laughs. But it rarely strikes the right tone and ultimately falls short of what one would expect from a collaboration between director Wim Wenders and writer Sam Shepard. The film begins as yet another look at the shallowness of Hollywood and the relentlessly formulaic product it dumps on an undemanding public (a theme that ought to be retired immediately, lest it become a cliche itself)
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,Sun reporter | November 7, 2007
In its 17 years in Baltimore, Everyman Theatre has found a niche in spare sets, even sparer casts and a dedication to modern classics by the likes of Arthur Miller, Sam Shepard and Tennessee Williams. The company has stretched its comfort zone with its share of period pieces, but never further than today as it presents Much Ado About Nothing. It's the Everyman's first full-scale Shakespearean production, the company's coming of age. If you go Much Ado About Nothing at Everyman Theatre, 1727 N. Charles St., runs through Dec. 16. For tickets, call 410-752-2208 or go to everymantheatre.
FEATURES
By George Papajohn and George Papajohn,Chicago Tribune | May 27, 1992
CHICAGO -- And now it's the veterinarians' turn to choke on their popcorn.For decades, psychiatrists have been portrayed in the movies as evil or ridiculous a pattern that reached a stomach-turning pinnacle when Dr. Hannibal Lecter, in 1991's "The Silence of the Lambs," became the first known member of the celluloid medical profession to dine on his patients.Over the years, movie audiences also have been exposed to a parade of corrupt lawyers, crazy cops, crooked clergy, repulsive reporters and stereotypes of every shade, creed and origin.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | August 26, 1992
Talk about banging the tin drum of art movie pretentiousness too slowly! Here comes Volker Schlondorff's "Voyager," one of those loony jihads of densely European existentialism that's as light as a potato pancake slathered in sour cream.Destiny! Free will! Coincidence! Incest! Myth! Sam Shepard!The movie, derived from a famous Swiss novel by Max Frisch, is really more a philosophic argument than a story; one feels its incidents being crudely stage-managed to spotlight this or that position rather than the organic and logical emergence of incident out of character.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 8, 2001
"Swordfish" is a souped-up roadster of a film, a relentless action flick that looks great and moves with more grace and speed than seems possible. Sure, it's a bunch of high-gloss candy, but who's going to think about that when there's so much excitement? Top-billed among the cast is John Travolta, obviously praying to the cinema gods that audiences will forget "Battlefield Earth." Here, he's the mysterious Gabriel Shear, and the avenging angel analogy is absolutely intentional. It takes most of the movie for his motives to become clear, even longer to figure out exactly who he is. But there's one thing we're sure of from the beginning: He's in control.
NEWS
June 11, 2007
Blue traffic lights? Nowadays, the yellow light means "Pedal to the metal." It means, "No way am I catching that red light with the rest of you losers." No one seems to pay attention to that signal anymore. Maybe blue lights will get people's attention? Hey, it's worth a shot. Today baltimoresun.com/cowherd LPGA's trail of emotions Suzann Pettersen's swing coach used to work with Michelle Wie. Yesterday at the LPGA Championship, his current student finished on top, while his former student was last.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 19, 2006
Don't Come Knocking presents its audience with an intriguingly dysfunctional family, and a handful of absurdist laughs. But it rarely strikes the right tone and ultimately falls short of what one would expect from a collaboration between director Wim Wenders and writer Sam Shepard. The film begins as yet another look at the shallowness of Hollywood and the relentlessly formulaic product it dumps on an undemanding public (a theme that ought to be retired immediately, lest it become a cliche itself)
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | September 25, 2003
When Rep Stage in Columbia opens its 2003-2004 season tomorrow with Fool for Love, it will mark the reunion of a director and a kindred playwright. The director is Jackson Phippin, and the playwright is Sam Shepard. Phippin, who directed Shepard's Buried Child at the Virginia Stage Company 20 years ago, said last week, "I share the same sort of sense of theatricality that Shepard has. I like meta-theatrical events, given my past with experimental work." Phippin, who served as associate artistic director of Center Stage from 1979 until 1985, came to Baltimore in the mid-1970s with the experimental troupe KRAKEN.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 8, 2001
"Swordfish" is a souped-up roadster of a film, a relentless action flick that looks great and moves with more grace and speed than seems possible. Sure, it's a bunch of high-gloss candy, but who's going to think about that when there's so much excitement? Top-billed among the cast is John Travolta, obviously praying to the cinema gods that audiences will forget "Battlefield Earth." Here, he's the mysterious Gabriel Shear, and the avenging angel analogy is absolutely intentional. It takes most of the movie for his motives to become clear, even longer to figure out exactly who he is. But there's one thing we're sure of from the beginning: He's in control.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,Contributing Writer | April 22, 1994
The Peruvian poet Cesar Vallejo once wrote, "Something identifies you with the one who leaves you, and it is your common power to return: thus your greatest sorrow."He continued: "Something separates you from the one who remains with you, and it is your common slavery to depart: thus your meagerest rejoicing."Those quotes open the script of Sam Shepard's 1986 play, "A Lie of the Mind," to be performed at Western Maryland College beginning today.On the surface, the play deals with a married couple, with their problems and their families, who are brought into the situation.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | August 26, 1992
Talk about banging the tin drum of art movie pretentiousness too slowly! Here comes Volker Schlondorff's "Voyager," one of those loony jihads of densely European existentialism that's as light as a potato pancake slathered in sour cream.Destiny! Free will! Coincidence! Incest! Myth! Sam Shepard!The movie, derived from a famous Swiss novel by Max Frisch, is really more a philosophic argument than a story; one feels its incidents being crudely stage-managed to spotlight this or that position rather than the organic and logical emergence of incident out of character.
SPORTS
By Diane Pucin and Diane Pucin,Knight-Ridder | July 6, 1992
PORTLAND, Ore. -- To all those who find 50-point basketball victories repugnant, tough luck.That's the word from the U.S. Olympic men's basketball team. Having won every game by about the 10-minute mark of the first half, having outdunked the other nine teams combined (62-56), having posed for more pictures than Miss America, Team USA is ready for Barcelona.After the United States beat Venezuela, 127-80, yesterday to win the gold medal at the Tournament of the Americas, Larry Bird grabbed the microphone.
SPORTS
By Diane Pucin and Diane Pucin,Knight-Ridder | July 6, 1992
PORTLAND, Ore. -- To all those who find 50-point basketball victories repugnant, tough luck.That's the word from the U.S. Olympic men's basketball team. Having won every game by about the 10-minute mark of the first half, having outdunked the other nine teams combined (62-56), having posed for more pictures than Miss America, Team USA is ready for Barcelona.After the United States beat Venezuela, 127-80, yesterday to win the gold medal at the Tournament of the Americas, Larry Bird grabbed the microphone.
FEATURES
May 8, 2006
Critic's Pick-- Elite troops in Somalia are trapped in a deadly firefight in Black Hawk Down (8 p.m.-11:30 p.m., FX), starring Sam Shepard, above.
FEATURES
By George Papajohn and George Papajohn,Chicago Tribune | May 27, 1992
CHICAGO -- And now it's the veterinarians' turn to choke on their popcorn.For decades, psychiatrists have been portrayed in the movies as evil or ridiculous a pattern that reached a stomach-turning pinnacle when Dr. Hannibal Lecter, in 1991's "The Silence of the Lambs," became the first known member of the celluloid medical profession to dine on his patients.Over the years, movie audiences also have been exposed to a parade of corrupt lawyers, crazy cops, crooked clergy, repulsive reporters and stereotypes of every shade, creed and origin.
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