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Sam Lacy

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NEWS
May 2, 2013
Thank you to Charlie Vascellaro for enlightening us about the hard work and persistence of Sam Lacy ("How Sam Lacy helped integrate baseball," April 23). Mr. Vascellaro and Mr. Lacy's love of the game and passion for fairness can make all Baltimoreans very proud. Mary Garson, Baltimore
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SPORTS
Sports Digest | October 17, 2013
Colleges Dacres' late goal caps rally as No. 8 UMBC men edge Vermont, 2-1 Senior midfielder Kadeem Dacres headed home the game-winning goal with 12 seconds to play as visiting UMBC rallied for a 2-1 soccer victory at Vermont. The eighth-ranked Retrievers won in Burlington for the first time since 2004 and improved to 11-1-1 overall and 2-0-1 in America East play. The Catamounts (7-3-3, 1-2-0) lost for the first time at home (5-1-1) in 2013. UMBC drew a foul 30 yards from the goal with 25 seconds remaining in the half.
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SPORTS
By Kevin Cowherd and The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2013
The new Jackie Robinson movie “42” starring Chadwick Boseman, Nicole Beharie and Harrison Ford is getting mixed reviews for its depiction of the man who broke baseball's color barrier. But at least one local person is incensed that the Warner Bros. film fails to mention the role played by Sam Lacy, the long-time sports editor and columnist of the Baltimore Afro-American newspaper, in Robinson's ascension to the major leagues with the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1947. “I think it's a travesty,”Tim Lacy, Sam Lacy's son, said of his father's exclusion in “42.” “Because if you know the story, [Sam Lacy]
NEWS
May 2, 2013
Thank you to Charlie Vascellaro for enlightening us about the hard work and persistence of Sam Lacy ("How Sam Lacy helped integrate baseball," April 23). Mr. Vascellaro and Mr. Lacy's love of the game and passion for fairness can make all Baltimoreans very proud. Mary Garson, Baltimore
NEWS
By Charlie Vascellaro | April 22, 2013
Like most films depicting historic accounts of real-life events, the bio-epic "42" carries the immediate disclaimer that it is based on a true story, leaving room for interpretive analysis and creative license. Consequently, dramatic interpretations are by their nature subject to scrutiny and debate. While the film sticks close to the well-chronicled historic record regarding Jackie Robinson's unique place in time as the first African American to play in the major leagues, its sins are mostly of omission.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Steadman and John Steadman,Sun Staff | January 24, 1999
"Fighting for Fairness: The Life Story of Hall of Fame Sportswriter Sam Lacy," by Sam Lacy with Moses J. Newson. Tidewater. 240 pages. $29.95.Energized by a sense of fair play and a typewriter that could spit fire, Sam Lacy stands as a freedom fighter, a sentinel at-the-ready, as he has fought the last 60-plus years to make the sports world a better place for humanity -- demolishing barriers and hoping to make the spirit of fun and games reflect the true ideals of life. His only objective was to press on.The specific cause of the black man, along with a desire to gain a level field for women athletes, has constantly drawn his attention.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | October 21, 1993
When Sam Lacy walked into his surprise party Tuesday morning and everybody started singing "Happy Birthday," he sang along for a moment, grandly and on-key, and then threw in a postscript."
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | April 15, 2003
SAM LACY WILL turn 100 years old in the fall, and he's still got plenty to say. So naturally, he showed up yesterday morning at the Baltimore Afro-American, as he has for the past 64 years, to write his sports column and take part in the business of the day: writing not only about games but how they connect to the human conscience. He is, in all fairness, slowing down a little. Until three years ago, when he was a mere 96, Lacy would drive in from Washington in the pre-dawn hours, write his column, and then head out to the links for nine holes of golf.
NEWS
By CHRIS LAMB | February 18, 1996
In late February 1946, Sam Lacy of the Baltimore Afro-American was in Daytona Beach, Florida, to report on the spring training of the Montreal Royals of the International League, the Brooklyn Dodgers' top minor league team. For the first time in the 20th century, a black man would take the field in a game in so-called organized professional baseball.The story of baseball's first integrated spring training was largely neglected by the country's mainstream press, which failed to give it the social or cultural context it deserved.
FEATURES
By Marilyn McCraven and Marilyn McCraven,SUN STAFF | April 1, 1997
Sam Lacy stretches the slim, tapered fingers of his left hand and ticks off the "best remembered" stories of his 60-year writing career.There's track star Wilma Rudolph winning three Olympic gold medals in Rome. Joe Louis defeating Max Schmeling. Tennis great Althea Gibson winning titles at Forest Hills and Wimbledon, and Arthur Ashe doing the same 20 years later.And, oh yes, enough Jackie Robinson stories to fill a book."People often ask me what was the biggest story I've covered," says Lacy, at 93 still a columnist with the Baltimore Afro-American newspaper.
NEWS
April 27, 2013
Thanks for your wonderful article about Sam Lacy ("How Sam Lacy helped integrate baseball," April 22). My husband and I were privileged to know Mr. Lacy during the last decade of his life and to hear directly from him what it was like during the days when Jackie Robinson broke into the majors. Sam's omission from "42" is indeed a travesty, to quote his son Tim. An equally apt word would be injustice. We are grateful to you for enlightening The Sun's readers about the pivotal role this modest, quiet, determined and gentle man played in establishing Major League Baseball as we know it today, and in recognizing that Jackie Robinson did indeed have the guts to let his skill do the fighting for him. Jan Roth
NEWS
By Charlie Vascellaro | April 22, 2013
Like most films depicting historic accounts of real-life events, the bio-epic "42" carries the immediate disclaimer that it is based on a true story, leaving room for interpretive analysis and creative license. Consequently, dramatic interpretations are by their nature subject to scrutiny and debate. While the film sticks close to the well-chronicled historic record regarding Jackie Robinson's unique place in time as the first African American to play in the major leagues, its sins are mostly of omission.
NEWS
April 19, 2013
Having just seen the wonderful film, "42," the other day, I, too, was struck by the absence of a mention of the Baltimore Afro-American's Sam Lacy in the sports reporting of such a momentous time in baseball, America's and civil rights history. Your article, "Sam Lacy's son upset by father's absence from '42'" (April 16) reveals Tim Lacy's surprise and hurt by the absence of any mention of his father's name despite all of his reporting as an eyewitness to history with Wendell Smith (the Pittsburgh Courier editor-reporter featured in the movie)
SPORTS
By Kevin Cowherd and The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2013
The new Jackie Robinson movie “42” starring Chadwick Boseman, Nicole Beharie and Harrison Ford is getting mixed reviews for its depiction of the man who broke baseball's color barrier. But at least one local person is incensed that the Warner Bros. film fails to mention the role played by Sam Lacy, the long-time sports editor and columnist of the Baltimore Afro-American newspaper, in Robinson's ascension to the major leagues with the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1947. “I think it's a travesty,”Tim Lacy, Sam Lacy's son, said of his father's exclusion in “42.” “Because if you know the story, [Sam Lacy]
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | May 18, 2003
AN ARMY travels on its stomach, a city on the creative passion of its citizens - its small businessmen, its neighborhood volunteers, its gadflies, raconteurs and colorful characters. These are the relatively anonymous dreamers and risk-takers, the opinion leaders who care about neighborhoods, who make opportunities for young people, who help government see the right thing and how to do it. These people honor their convictions even when it brings them pain and setback. They do what they do because they can do no other.
SPORTS
By Christian Ewell and Christian Ewell,SUN STAFF | May 17, 2003
WASHINGTON - Sam Lacy, the Baltimore sportswriter hailed for his efforts to erase baseball's color line, was laid to rest yesterday after an understated farewell that echoed the manner of his life. The crowd at the funeral - including Baltimore Mayor Martin O'Malley and Pro Football Hall of Famer Lenny Moore - was large enough to fill only half of Mount Zion Baptist Church in the city's Northwest section. For much of the program, the tone was one of restrained celebration of a life that lasted 99 years before Lacy died of heart and kidney failure May 8. Perhaps staid was best, as Lacy's contributions spoke for themselves during his 69 years in journalism - including 59 at The Afro-American - pre-dating Jackie Robinson's integration of major league baseball and probably outlasting the prolonged career of Michael Jordan.
NEWS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,SUN STAFF | July 26, 1998
It is spring training 1948, and Jackie Robinson is dogging it. The Brooklyn Dodgers' Rookie of the Year arrives four days late and 15 pounds overweight, and spends much of practice joking with reporters.Sam Lacy is not among them. To the sports editor of the Baltimore Afro-American Robinson appears blase, indifferent. And fat. Disgraceful, writes Lacy, the lone scribe - black or white - to rebuke the Dodgers star for his "lackadaisical attitude" and for "laying down" on the job.Within a week, Robinson is his old self - lean, focused and bent on proving Lacy wrong.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal and Ken Rosenthal,SUN COLUMNIST | April 23, 1998
Ninety-four years of swimming upstream, and you'd think it would be enough for Sam Lacy just to tread water.Not a chance.Lacy is still working, still writing, still making waves.Check out this week's edition of the Afro-American. Lacy's column calls for the end of the designated hitter, arguing that the only way to stop pitchers like Randy Johnson and Roger Clemens from throwing at hitters is to force them to bat.Another story with his byline states that the Orioles built their 10-2 record by feasting on weaker opponents, and suggests that Texas manager Johnny Oates and pitching coach Dick Bosman were stealing signs last weekend.
NEWS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,SUN STAFF | May 10, 2003
Sam Lacy, a Baltimore sportswriter whose crusade for integration rattled the cage of big league baseball and helped erase the game's color line more than a half-century ago, died Thursday of heart and kidney failure at Washington Hospital Center in Washington, D.C. He was 99. In a professional career that spanned eight decades, Mr. Lacy always kept his edge. His columns in the Afro-American agitated for change, championed the underdog and chronicled the rise of black athletes, especially early on, when minorities were largely ignored by the mainstream press.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | April 15, 2003
SAM LACY WILL turn 100 years old in the fall, and he's still got plenty to say. So naturally, he showed up yesterday morning at the Baltimore Afro-American, as he has for the past 64 years, to write his sports column and take part in the business of the day: writing not only about games but how they connect to the human conscience. He is, in all fairness, slowing down a little. Until three years ago, when he was a mere 96, Lacy would drive in from Washington in the pre-dawn hours, write his column, and then head out to the links for nine holes of golf.
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