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By Special to The Sun | December 9, 1990
AUSTIN, Texas -- Loyola College hit 68 percent from the field in the last 20 minutes and came away with an 85-72 victory over Sam Houston State in the consolation game of the Longhorn Classic at the Erwin Special Events Center on the University of Texas campus.Kevin Green scored a game-high 28 points for Loyola (3-4), including 20 in the second half, when the Baltimore school made 17 of its 25 shots from the field. After a controlled first half (eight turnovers, the lowest in a first half this year)
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 9, 2004
Thank goodness for Davy Crockett; without him, the Alamo could have proven the blandest heroic siege in movie history. Advance billing has trumpeted The Alamo as a true depiction of the battle that swayed Texans' hearts and minds toward independence - a problematic assertion, given how little really is known of what actually happened on that February morning back in 1836. All the fort's defenders died, meaning history has had to rely on legend and the accounts of the victorious Mexicans, who failed to report in detail the manner in which the rebellious Texans were killed.
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SPORTS
By Bill Free and Bill Free,SUN STAFF | December 29, 1997
OKLAHOMA CITY -- After flirting with big-time basketball success on the road for five weeks, the Coppin State basketball team ran out of gas last night.The sluggish Eagles might have receded to their lowest ebb in 12 years under Fang Mitchell with a 64-59 loss to Sam Houston State in the consolation game of the All-College Tournament at the Myriad Center.Coppin (3-6) didn't look at all like the same team that had outplayed defending national champion Arizona for 30 minutes earlier this month or the squad that beat Missouri in Columbia and took Iowa State to overtime in Ames before losing in early December.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | December 31, 2003
Eighth-ranked Cardinal Gibbons overcame an 11-point halftime deficit to win the championship of the Ray Mullis Invitational, 75-72, over No. 17 Lansdowne. Leon Williams capped a big fourth quarter for Gibbons, in which the host Crusaders outscored the Vikings 25-14. Williams made the first of two free throws to put Gibbons up 73-72, then hit a layup with 7.8 seconds left after the Crusaders (10-2) grabbed the rebound off his missed second attempt. Ken Hasbrouck scored 20 points, including 15 in the fourth quarter, to help the rally.
FEATURES
By Gaile Robinson and Gaile Robinson,FORT WORTH STAR-TELEGRAM | December 4, 1998
The tree is the most profound sight at the Alamo.Anyone who has been to Texas' most famous historical attraction in the last half of this century knows immediately which tree: the enormous, undulating live oak that dominates the courtyard.The Alamo tree is for sale; so are offspring of the Civil War battlefields -- Pickett's Charge Black Walnut from Gettysburg, and the Antietam Sycamore. Cuttings and seedlings from many of America's most famous trees are being sold by American Forests, the oldest nonprofit conservation organization in the United States, through its Historic & Famous Trees program.
NEWS
September 24, 2003
On September 21, 2003 MARY JANE "TEENIE" (nee Scott) HOUSTON of Ellicott City; beloved wife of the late James E. Houston, Sr.; devoted mother of James E. Houston, Jr., Carolyn Johnson, Lee Kelly, Mary Young, William Houston, Martha Ebb, Sam Houston, Melba Jones, Lawrence Houston, Lawren Houston and the late John Houston and Helen Davenport. Ms. Houston was predeceased by her 16 siblings. She is also survived by two sons-in-law, three daughters-in-law, 48 grandchildren, 73 great grandchildren, 30 great-great grandchildren, one special niece Rose and a host of other nieces, nephews, other relatives and friends.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | April 24, 2001
HUNTSVILLE, TEXAS - People visit this East Texas town to catch a glimpse of its seven-story statue of favorite son Sam Houston. They shop the quaint row of antique stores, painted in desert shades to resemble a western frontier town. Or they hike in the Huntsville State Park and Sam Houston National Forest or scuba dive in an old limestone quarry. But despite the town's best efforts, Huntsville is known best for killing people. This is the capital punishment capital of the country. Officials at the Huntsville "Walls" Unit prison have executed about one-third of the roughly 700 inmates put to death nationwide since the U.S. Supreme Court reinstated the death penalty in 1976.
NEWS
By Michael Lind | August 20, 1992
POLITICS," Henry Adams observed, "is the systematic organization of hatreds."In Houston the country-club Republicans supplied the organization and the Buchanan-Robertson brigades supplied the hatreds.Even as the Democratic fringe was being shown the door by the party's new leadership, the GOP was surrendering to its own fringe, the San Jacinto Republicans.San Jacinto is the marshy site near the convention center where, in 1836, Gen. Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna managed to turn his overwhelming advantages over Sam Houston's small army of rebel Texans into a debacle.
SPORTS
By Jerry Bembry | December 10, 1990
A year ago, the Loyola Greyhounds had won one of eight games and was a team looking for answers. They would finish 4-24, and the future didn't look too bright.Things are different this season. Loyola raised its record to 3-4 Saturday with an 85-72 win over Sam Houston State in the consolation game of the Longhorn Classic in Austin, Texas.After the Greyhounds lost to Towson State, 62-60, in the championship game of the Beltway Classic Dec. 1, coach Tom Schneider wanted someone to take the scoring burden off guards Kevin Green and Tracy Bergan.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | December 31, 2003
Eighth-ranked Cardinal Gibbons overcame an 11-point halftime deficit to win the championship of the Ray Mullis Invitational, 75-72, over No. 17 Lansdowne. Leon Williams capped a big fourth quarter for Gibbons, in which the host Crusaders outscored the Vikings 25-14. Williams made the first of two free throws to put Gibbons up 73-72, then hit a layup with 7.8 seconds left after the Crusaders (10-2) grabbed the rebound off his missed second attempt. Ken Hasbrouck scored 20 points, including 15 in the fourth quarter, to help the rally.
NEWS
September 24, 2003
On September 21, 2003 MARY JANE "TEENIE" (nee Scott) HOUSTON of Ellicott City; beloved wife of the late James E. Houston, Sr.; devoted mother of James E. Houston, Jr., Carolyn Johnson, Lee Kelly, Mary Young, William Houston, Martha Ebb, Sam Houston, Melba Jones, Lawrence Houston, Lawren Houston and the late John Houston and Helen Davenport. Ms. Houston was predeceased by her 16 siblings. She is also survived by two sons-in-law, three daughters-in-law, 48 grandchildren, 73 great grandchildren, 30 great-great grandchildren, one special niece Rose and a host of other nieces, nephews, other relatives and friends.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | April 24, 2001
HUNTSVILLE, TEXAS - People visit this East Texas town to catch a glimpse of its seven-story statue of favorite son Sam Houston. They shop the quaint row of antique stores, painted in desert shades to resemble a western frontier town. Or they hike in the Huntsville State Park and Sam Houston National Forest or scuba dive in an old limestone quarry. But despite the town's best efforts, Huntsville is known best for killing people. This is the capital punishment capital of the country. Officials at the Huntsville "Walls" Unit prison have executed about one-third of the roughly 700 inmates put to death nationwide since the U.S. Supreme Court reinstated the death penalty in 1976.
FEATURES
By Gaile Robinson and Gaile Robinson,FORT WORTH STAR-TELEGRAM | December 4, 1998
The tree is the most profound sight at the Alamo.Anyone who has been to Texas' most famous historical attraction in the last half of this century knows immediately which tree: the enormous, undulating live oak that dominates the courtyard.The Alamo tree is for sale; so are offspring of the Civil War battlefields -- Pickett's Charge Black Walnut from Gettysburg, and the Antietam Sycamore. Cuttings and seedlings from many of America's most famous trees are being sold by American Forests, the oldest nonprofit conservation organization in the United States, through its Historic & Famous Trees program.
SPORTS
By Bill Free and Bill Free,SUN STAFF | December 29, 1997
OKLAHOMA CITY -- After flirting with big-time basketball success on the road for five weeks, the Coppin State basketball team ran out of gas last night.The sluggish Eagles might have receded to their lowest ebb in 12 years under Fang Mitchell with a 64-59 loss to Sam Houston State in the consolation game of the All-College Tournament at the Myriad Center.Coppin (3-6) didn't look at all like the same team that had outplayed defending national champion Arizona for 30 minutes earlier this month or the squad that beat Missouri in Columbia and took Iowa State to overtime in Ames before losing in early December.
SPORTS
May 26, 1996
BaseballBrett Butler was released from Emory University Hospital in Atlanta yesterday, four days after the Los Angeles Dodgers outfielder had a cancerous lymph node removed from his neck."
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | April 15, 1995
It might take a Texas-size measure of stamina and fortitude, but if you can hang on through the first hour of "James Michener's 'Texas' " at 9 tomorrow night on ABC (WMAR-Channel 2), you've weathered the worst of this so-so miniseries.Things get a lot better in Monday night's conclusion of this four-hour fictionalized history of Texas. But "uneven" doesn't begin to cover what you'll see.The low end of the experience begins tomorrow night, when you realize in the opening minutes that Patrick Duffy is playing Stephen F. Austin with a range not quite worthy of the adjective "wooden."
SPORTS
May 26, 1996
BaseballBrett Butler was released from Emory University Hospital in Atlanta yesterday, four days after the Los Angeles Dodgers outfielder had a cancerous lymph node removed from his neck."
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | April 15, 1995
It might take a Texas-size measure of stamina and fortitude, but if you can hang on through the first hour of "James Michener's 'Texas' " at 9 tomorrow night on ABC (WMAR-Channel 2), you've weathered the worst of this so-so miniseries.Things get a lot better in Monday night's conclusion of this four-hour fictionalized history of Texas. But "uneven" doesn't begin to cover what you'll see.The low end of the experience begins tomorrow night, when you realize in the opening minutes that Patrick Duffy is playing Stephen F. Austin with a range not quite worthy of the adjective "wooden."
NEWS
By Michael Lind | August 20, 1992
POLITICS," Henry Adams observed, "is the systematic organization of hatreds."In Houston the country-club Republicans supplied the organization and the Buchanan-Robertson brigades supplied the hatreds.Even as the Democratic fringe was being shown the door by the party's new leadership, the GOP was surrendering to its own fringe, the San Jacinto Republicans.San Jacinto is the marshy site near the convention center where, in 1836, Gen. Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna managed to turn his overwhelming advantages over Sam Houston's small army of rebel Texans into a debacle.
SPORTS
By Jerry Bembry | December 10, 1990
A year ago, the Loyola Greyhounds had won one of eight games and was a team looking for answers. They would finish 4-24, and the future didn't look too bright.Things are different this season. Loyola raised its record to 3-4 Saturday with an 85-72 win over Sam Houston State in the consolation game of the Longhorn Classic in Austin, Texas.After the Greyhounds lost to Towson State, 62-60, in the championship game of the Beltway Classic Dec. 1, coach Tom Schneider wanted someone to take the scoring burden off guards Kevin Green and Tracy Bergan.
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