Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSam Gash
IN THE NEWS

Sam Gash

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,Sun reporter | September 7, 2007
His name seemed a fitting allusion to what he did on the field. For two years, fullback Sam Gash cleared paths for Ravens running backs, bulldozed would-be tacklers and sprang Jamal Lewis and Terry Allen for sometimes hefty chunks of yardage. Gash was a grunt, a bodyguard, a blocker whose dominant play helped the Ravens win the Super Bowl in January 2001. In three seasons with the team, the fullback carried the ball a total of four times. But it was the road less traveled that earned the two-time Pro Bowl pick the championship ring he slips onto his scarred left hand on Sundays in the fall.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | October 21, 2010
Gash, an assistant with the Detroit Lions, hopes to become a head coach someday Sam Gash, former Ravens fullback, recalls Super Bowl championship season Sam Gash came to town in 2000, with the shirt on his back and a hunger to hit. He left with a Super Bowl ring and the thanks of the fans. Signed quickly as a free agent at the start of training camp, when Ravens' fullback Chuck Evans got hurt, Gash arrived without a change of clothes. No matter. For three years, he wore purple and blocked with a vengence that turned opponents black and blue.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | November 25, 2002
They've shown up with the sniffles. They've worked through sore throats. They've never let a little winter cold or a yearning to avoid a test or fudge a missed homework assignment keep them home. For at least the past 225 days of school, 16 Medfield Heights Elementary pupils have not skipped a day of class. Yesterday, Ravens fullback Sam Gash treated them and their parents, grandparents and teachers to a football game for their efforts. "It's a great way for kids to see how important school is," said Katie Becker, who teaches fourth- and fifth-grade math at Medfield Heights.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,Sun reporter | September 7, 2007
His name seemed a fitting allusion to what he did on the field. For two years, fullback Sam Gash cleared paths for Ravens running backs, bulldozed would-be tacklers and sprang Jamal Lewis and Terry Allen for sometimes hefty chunks of yardage. Gash was a grunt, a bodyguard, a blocker whose dominant play helped the Ravens win the Super Bowl in January 2001. In three seasons with the team, the fullback carried the ball a total of four times. But it was the road less traveled that earned the two-time Pro Bowl pick the championship ring he slips onto his scarred left hand on Sundays in the fall.
SPORTS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,SUN STAFF | August 8, 2002
His mentor has yet to sign, leaving Ravens fullback Alan Ricard to conclude that he is on the right path to keeping his starting job. Ricard studied the way Sam Gash bulldozed defenders the past two seasons, creating holes for Jamal Lewis in 2000, then Terry Allen and Jason Brookins last year. Gash, regarded as one of the top blocking fullbacks in the league, is still an unrestricted free agent. Though the Ravens were in talks with him earlier this off-season, no agreement was reached, and the team will enter the preseason schedule with just Ricard and two undrafted rookie free agents behind him. The Ravens could have pursued Gash again once Ray Lewis signed a revised contract extension last week that gave the them more salary cap room, but instead the team acquired tackle Ethan Brooks and linebacker Bernardo Harris.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | January 12, 2001
The Ravens traveled 20 miles from their Owings Mills complex to practice at PSINet Stadium yesterday. They typically leave Saturday for Sunday road games, but they will depart Baltimore-Washington International Airport at 2 p.m. today for Sunday's AFC championship game against the Raiders at Oakland. Those logistical concerns shouldn't matter, because coach Brian Billick shaved a total of 45 minutes from Ravens' practices this week. "We were much more energetic today," Billick said. "It looks like we're getting our legs back just a little bit. We needed to. [Today]
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | September 3, 2001
A season-ending injury to the star running back and a succession of nicks on the offensive line have led to hand-wringing and hair-pulling among Ravens fans. Forgotten in the consternation over a seemingly fragile ground game, however, is that the blocking schemes include Sam Gash. Gash is the veteran fullback who has two carries to show for the past two seasons. Minuscule production on statistical summaries made him No. 350 among the 500 players Sports Illustrated rated on its Player Value Rankings at the offensive skill positions, but Gash's game isn't about touches.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | October 21, 2010
Gash, an assistant with the Detroit Lions, hopes to become a head coach someday Sam Gash, former Ravens fullback, recalls Super Bowl championship season Sam Gash came to town in 2000, with the shirt on his back and a hunger to hit. He left with a Super Bowl ring and the thanks of the fans. Signed quickly as a free agent at the start of training camp, when Ravens' fullback Chuck Evans got hurt, Gash arrived without a change of clothes. No matter. For three years, he wore purple and blocked with a vengence that turned opponents black and blue.
SPORTS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,SUN STAFF | September 28, 2002
Defensive tackle Maake Kemoeatu approached the Ravens' coaching staff with a simple suggestion on how he could be a more effective player. He was quickly rebuffed. "I told one of the coaches one time that maybe I should try and lose 20 pounds and rush off the edge," said the 6-foot-5, 312-pound Kemoeatu. "They said no. They brought me here to stop the run and clog up the middle. "I'm fine with that. I like that position. That's what I did in college." And that is the primary reason why the undrafted rookie out of Utah has a prominent role in the Ravens' defensive line rotation.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | January 13, 2001
The status of injured strong safety Kim Herring (ankle) and reserve linebacker Cornell Brown (hamstring) will be game-day decisions, but coach Brian Billick and Herrring did not sound encouraging about his chances to play against the Raiders in tomorrow's AFC championship game. "Cornell is looking fairly strong," Billick said. "Kim still has a little tender ankle. We'll see how they feel." Herring suffered an ankle bruise in the Dec. 31 wild-card win over Denver, and did not suit up for the divisional playoff win at Tennessee last Sunday.
SPORTS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,SUN STAFF | September 24, 2003
Every once in a while, when Ravens fullback Alan Ricard has a free moment during the offseason, he will take a drive past his former place of employment in Houston, then thank heavens he is playing professional football. You might not consider being a car salesman at a Ford dealership the world's worst job, yet it was for Ricard, who left the profession in 1999 after a month's stint. "That just wasn't me," said the relatively low-key Ricard. Ricard was living with his sister in Houston after being cut by the Dallas Cowboys during training camp that year.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | November 25, 2002
They've shown up with the sniffles. They've worked through sore throats. They've never let a little winter cold or a yearning to avoid a test or fudge a missed homework assignment keep them home. For at least the past 225 days of school, 16 Medfield Heights Elementary pupils have not skipped a day of class. Yesterday, Ravens fullback Sam Gash treated them and their parents, grandparents and teachers to a football game for their efforts. "It's a great way for kids to see how important school is," said Katie Becker, who teaches fourth- and fifth-grade math at Medfield Heights.
SPORTS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,SUN STAFF | September 28, 2002
Defensive tackle Maake Kemoeatu approached the Ravens' coaching staff with a simple suggestion on how he could be a more effective player. He was quickly rebuffed. "I told one of the coaches one time that maybe I should try and lose 20 pounds and rush off the edge," said the 6-foot-5, 312-pound Kemoeatu. "They said no. They brought me here to stop the run and clog up the middle. "I'm fine with that. I like that position. That's what I did in college." And that is the primary reason why the undrafted rookie out of Utah has a prominent role in the Ravens' defensive line rotation.
SPORTS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,SUN STAFF | August 8, 2002
His mentor has yet to sign, leaving Ravens fullback Alan Ricard to conclude that he is on the right path to keeping his starting job. Ricard studied the way Sam Gash bulldozed defenders the past two seasons, creating holes for Jamal Lewis in 2000, then Terry Allen and Jason Brookins last year. Gash, regarded as one of the top blocking fullbacks in the league, is still an unrestricted free agent. Though the Ravens were in talks with him earlier this off-season, no agreement was reached, and the team will enter the preseason schedule with just Ricard and two undrafted rookie free agents behind him. The Ravens could have pursued Gash again once Ray Lewis signed a revised contract extension last week that gave the them more salary cap room, but instead the team acquired tackle Ethan Brooks and linebacker Bernardo Harris.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | September 3, 2001
A season-ending injury to the star running back and a succession of nicks on the offensive line have led to hand-wringing and hair-pulling among Ravens fans. Forgotten in the consternation over a seemingly fragile ground game, however, is that the blocking schemes include Sam Gash. Gash is the veteran fullback who has two carries to show for the past two seasons. Minuscule production on statistical summaries made him No. 350 among the 500 players Sports Illustrated rated on its Player Value Rankings at the offensive skill positions, but Gash's game isn't about touches.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | January 13, 2001
The status of injured strong safety Kim Herring (ankle) and reserve linebacker Cornell Brown (hamstring) will be game-day decisions, but coach Brian Billick and Herrring did not sound encouraging about his chances to play against the Raiders in tomorrow's AFC championship game. "Cornell is looking fairly strong," Billick said. "Kim still has a little tender ankle. We'll see how they feel." Herring suffered an ankle bruise in the Dec. 31 wild-card win over Denver, and did not suit up for the divisional playoff win at Tennessee last Sunday.
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht | December 29, 1998
PreseasonCoach Ted Marchibroda stubbornly refused to acknowledge the obvious regarding his offensive backfield. He stuck with Jay Graham at tailback, even though Errict Rhett, acquired in a February trade for a third-round draft pick, outplayed Graham in training camp and the preseason. Four days before the season opener, Marchibroda gave Rhett the job, which did wonders for Graham's confidence.Season openerFans will remember the game as a dark comedy of errors that set the tone for a lost season.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,SUN STAFF | December 5, 2000
In an attempt to shut off any outside diversions, the Ravens have decided to open negotiations with all 14 players who will be unrestricted free agents at season's end. By the Ravens' line of thinking, initiating talks shows their determination to keep this team intact and maintains focus in pursuit of their first trip to the playoffs. The Ravens have five starters - quarterback Trent Dilfer, center Jeff Mitchell, linebacker Jamie Sharper, safety Kim Herring and fullback Sam Gash - among their unrestricted free agents and plan to keep their side of the negotiations in-house until the off-season.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | January 12, 2001
The Ravens traveled 20 miles from their Owings Mills complex to practice at PSINet Stadium yesterday. They typically leave Saturday for Sunday road games, but they will depart Baltimore-Washington International Airport at 2 p.m. today for Sunday's AFC championship game against the Raiders at Oakland. Those logistical concerns shouldn't matter, because coach Brian Billick shaved a total of 45 minutes from Ravens' practices this week. "We were much more energetic today," Billick said. "It looks like we're getting our legs back just a little bit. We needed to. [Today]
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,SUN STAFF | December 5, 2000
In an attempt to shut off any outside diversions, the Ravens have decided to open negotiations with all 14 players who will be unrestricted free agents at season's end. By the Ravens' line of thinking, initiating talks shows their determination to keep this team intact and maintains focus in pursuit of their first trip to the playoffs. The Ravens have five starters - quarterback Trent Dilfer, center Jeff Mitchell, linebacker Jamie Sharper, safety Kim Herring and fullback Sam Gash - among their unrestricted free agents and plan to keep their side of the negotiations in-house until the off-season.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.