Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSam Cooke
IN THE NEWS

Sam Cooke

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and The Baltimore Sun | January 20, 2012
In 2007, legendary singer Etta James was booked for the PAETEC Jazz Festival in downtown Baltimore. I interviewed her a few weeks before the show -- but she later had to back out due to health problems. Here is part of the interview, which was never published before. Apparently, when James used to play Baltimore back in the '50s and '60s, she was quite the target. Etta, do you have any memories of Baltimore from back in the day? I used to go to Baltimore at least two or three times a year, at the Royal Theatre.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2012
The temptation to talk about Allen Stone's look - the long, straggly blond hair, his trademark Seattle Supersonics jersey and those chunky reading glasses a great-grandmother might consider out of style - completely disappears once he opens his mouth. That's because a voice like Stone's warm tenor sounds like a product of a forgotten, pre-Auto-Tune era. Stone, who is currently opening for Jack's Mannequin but will perform his own headlining set at the 8x10 on Sunday, is one of the most promising and surprising soul singers in years.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Sun Staff Writer | February 13, 1995
Sam Cooke emerges from this biography perhaps even more intriguing than he had previously been, and for that one has to thank Daniel Wolff. "You Send Me" is a solidly written effort that not only helps the reader understand the late singer, but establishes his place in music and in American society.For Mr. Wolff sees Cooke (1931-1964) as more than an uncommonly gifted singer who became a star in the fields of gospel, rhythm and blues and pop. Cooke's rise from modest beginnings in South Side Chicago to international fame coincided with the changing situation of blacks in America.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and The Baltimore Sun | January 20, 2012
In 2007, legendary singer Etta James was booked for the PAETEC Jazz Festival in downtown Baltimore. I interviewed her a few weeks before the show -- but she later had to back out due to health problems. Here is part of the interview, which was never published before. Apparently, when James used to play Baltimore back in the '50s and '60s, she was quite the target. Etta, do you have any memories of Baltimore from back in the day? I used to go to Baltimore at least two or three times a year, at the Royal Theatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
By RASHOD D. OLLISON | November 3, 2005
I enter Peter Guralnick's room at the Hotel George in Washington. And after we exchange hellos and shake hands, the author asks about my grandmother. I stop for a moment at the table where we're about to settle down for our interview, wondering why in the world he wants to know about my grandmother. "Did she like the Johnnie Taylor story?" Peter asks. The mental fog suddenly lifts. Oh, yeah. The Johnnie Taylor story. Six years ago, when I was a music writer intern in Dallas, I interviewed Peter for a profile I wrote on the late soul-blues star.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Staff | July 17, 2003
If you listen to Sam Cooke and feel nothing, if your emotions don't soar, dip, plummet and rise again, then somebody needs to call the undertaker before you stink up the room. Your soul has apparently left your body. There's no pulse. You are dead, my friend. Sam Cooke's music is an experience. The man didn't just sing a tune, he completely embodied it. He causes what I call "soulquakes"; that's when the feeling of a song touches so deeply that things within begin to shift. The hands may tremble, tears may fall.
NEWS
June 4, 2000
Johnnie Taylor, 62, a soul legend whose 1976 "Disco Lady" was a hit on the dance floor and on the pop charts, died of an apparent heart attack Wednesday in Dallas. The Crawfordsville, Ark., native was nicknamed the "Philosopher of Soul" by Memphis' Stax Records. Mr. Taylor was a protege of Sam Cooke and took over the Soul Stirrers after Cooke left gospel for rhythm and blues in the 1950s. In 1968, he scored his first No. 1 on the R&B charts with "Who's Making Love," followed by other hits.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | June 6, 1995
Rock stars rarely improve with age. Some do, of course, but most end up offering increasingly threadbare variations on what they did in their youth. Whether it's Chuck Berry and Jerry Lee Lewis or Mick Jagger and Paul McCartney, the story remains the same; read between the lines of even the most favorable reviews, and what you'll find isn't "this is the best they've ever been" but just "not bad for old guys."By rights, Rod Stewart ought to be at the head of that class. His slide began almost two decades ago, and he moved from the pre-fab disco of "Da Ya Think I'm Sexy?"
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | July 26, 1991
Although it was meant as a christening, last night's season-opening concert at the Pier 6 Concert Pavilion was in some ways more like a wedding.There was something old: headliner Ben E. King. There was also something new, namely the pavilion itself. King's set had plenty that was borrowed, including songs by Sam Cooke, Otis Redding and the Shirelles, and anyone looking for something blue need only have glanced at the neon "Harborlights Concerts" sign above the stage.Mostly, though, it was like a wedding in the sense that it seemed to herald a bright and productive future -- provided, of course, the evening's few awkward moments were simply the result of a new situation and not signals of trouble ahead.
NEWS
By Nia-Malika Henderson and Nia-Malika Henderson,[sun reporter] | December 10, 2006
Annapolis worker returns to his roots to record solo CD It was the Shirelles that got Anthony J. Spencer singing back in the 1960s - they were the girl group and, at 10, he could match their pitch. By the time he was 14, Spencer was leading a local rhythm and blues band, Tra and the Diamonds. They went into the studio and recorded a song about good loving called "Run To Me" - "If you ever want to mess around, run to me, if you ever want to paint the town, run to me" - before Spencer knew much about love.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Colleen Dorsey, b | August 23, 2011
With a B.A. in dance and psychology, 24-year-old Melissa Talleda keeps busy, dancing and choreographing with Baltimore modern dance company the Collective and teaching preschool children in Bolton Hill life skills such as manners, sharing and respect. She took some time to talk with b in the days preceding the Collective's newest show, a collaborative effort between the dancers, Baltimore band The Water and DJ Relax. Check out her talent on Friday, but check out her answers now: Worst pet peeve?
ENTERTAINMENT
By RASHOD D. OLLISON | March 6, 2008
I remember standing in the sun - sipping my overpriced, overly sweetened lemonade - and thinking, "I want to like him, but I just don't know." Ryan Shaw was on the main stage during last year's Artscape, singing his heart out to a largely indifferent crowd. Granted, it was early in the afternoon and most were probably waiting for the fiery reggae of Burning Spear, the evening's headliner. But the Georgia soul singer with the blond-tipped dreadlocks managed to engage the mostly white, middle-age folks near the front of the stage.
NEWS
By Nia-Malika Henderson and Nia-Malika Henderson,[sun reporter] | December 10, 2006
Annapolis worker returns to his roots to record solo CD It was the Shirelles that got Anthony J. Spencer singing back in the 1960s - they were the girl group and, at 10, he could match their pitch. By the time he was 14, Spencer was leading a local rhythm and blues band, Tra and the Diamonds. They went into the studio and recorded a song about good loving called "Run To Me" - "If you ever want to mess around, run to me, if you ever want to paint the town, run to me" - before Spencer knew much about love.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jim Farber and Jim Farber,McClatchy-Tribune | October 26, 2006
John Legend is betting his career on the public's escalating disgust. "Millions of people hate what's on the radio right now," he says. "I also hate what's on the radio right now. So I've put my bet on being different." His new single couldn't be more so. "Save Room" oozes with vintage lounge soulfulness, suggesting something sung by Tom Jones in 1968. In fact, Legend swiped the song's surging organ hook from "Stormy," a hit by the Classics IV that dates back to the Nixon administration.
ENTERTAINMENT
By RASHOD D. OLLISON | November 3, 2005
I enter Peter Guralnick's room at the Hotel George in Washington. And after we exchange hellos and shake hands, the author asks about my grandmother. I stop for a moment at the table where we're about to settle down for our interview, wondering why in the world he wants to know about my grandmother. "Did she like the Johnnie Taylor story?" Peter asks. The mental fog suddenly lifts. Oh, yeah. The Johnnie Taylor story. Six years ago, when I was a music writer intern in Dallas, I interviewed Peter for a profile I wrote on the late soul-blues star.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | October 23, 2003
Gavin DeGraw is hungry. He's walking around downtown New Orleans in the afternoon, looking for a decent spot where he can grab something. In a few hours, the singer-songwriter will be back on the road, en route to a gig in Arkansas. Right now, though, DeGraw chats on his cell phone about his life, his music and how the two come together on his impressive debut, Chariot. "I love to be on stage," says the native New Yorker, 26. "Just the opportunity to play live has been great. People need to know that what they're hearing on record is real."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Colleen Dorsey, b | August 23, 2011
With a B.A. in dance and psychology, 24-year-old Melissa Talleda keeps busy, dancing and choreographing with Baltimore modern dance company the Collective and teaching preschool children in Bolton Hill life skills such as manners, sharing and respect. She took some time to talk with b in the days preceding the Collective's newest show, a collaborative effort between the dancers, Baltimore band The Water and DJ Relax. Check out her talent on Friday, but check out her answers now: Worst pet peeve?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | October 23, 2003
Gavin DeGraw is hungry. He's walking around downtown New Orleans in the afternoon, looking for a decent spot where he can grab something. In a few hours, the singer-songwriter will be back on the road, en route to a gig in Arkansas. Right now, though, DeGraw chats on his cell phone about his life, his music and how the two come together on his impressive debut, Chariot. "I love to be on stage," says the native New Yorker, 26. "Just the opportunity to play live has been great. People need to know that what they're hearing on record is real."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Staff | July 17, 2003
If you listen to Sam Cooke and feel nothing, if your emotions don't soar, dip, plummet and rise again, then somebody needs to call the undertaker before you stink up the room. Your soul has apparently left your body. There's no pulse. You are dead, my friend. Sam Cooke's music is an experience. The man didn't just sing a tune, he completely embodied it. He causes what I call "soulquakes"; that's when the feeling of a song touches so deeply that things within begin to shift. The hands may tremble, tears may fall.
NEWS
June 4, 2000
Johnnie Taylor, 62, a soul legend whose 1976 "Disco Lady" was a hit on the dance floor and on the pop charts, died of an apparent heart attack Wednesday in Dallas. The Crawfordsville, Ark., native was nicknamed the "Philosopher of Soul" by Memphis' Stax Records. Mr. Taylor was a protege of Sam Cooke and took over the Soul Stirrers after Cooke left gospel for rhythm and blues in the 1950s. In 1968, he scored his first No. 1 on the R&B charts with "Who's Making Love," followed by other hits.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.