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By Edward Rothstein and Edward Rothstein,New York Times News Service | August 16, 1992
Towering above the Salzburg Festival concert halls is the Monchsberg, an enormous cliff. The theaters were originally going to be built on top of the mountain, where one can walk today on paved paths offering panoramic views of farms, valleys and the church spires of the old city.Instead, the connection to nature was made even more intimate: the theaters were built into the cliff's base. Fifty thousand tons of rock were blasted away to construct the Large Festival Hall in 1960.The oldest hall, called the Summer Riding School, was once an arena where bearbaiting and horse displays were presented for the local princely households.
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By JOHN FLEMING and JOHN FLEMING,ST. PETERSBURG TIMES | July 23, 2006
MOZART WAS NOT A NATURE lover. On all his youthful travels by horse-drawn coach throughout Europe as a prodigy, he rarely commented on the landscape that he passed through in letters to family and friends. He loved cosmopolitan cities such as Paris, London and Vienna. Yet the closest I felt to Mozart on a recent trip to Austria came in a bucolic setting, the Monchsberg, a forested ridge above his hometown of Salzburg. I had spent the previous day and a half wandering around churches, cemeteries, a mansion and a fortress, all with connections to the composer.
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FEATURES
January 27, 2006
Jan. 27-- 1756: Composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart was born in Salzburg, Austria. 1973: The Vietnam peace accords were signed in Paris.
FEATURES
January 27, 2006
Jan. 27-- 1756: Composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart was born in Salzburg, Austria. 1973: The Vietnam peace accords were signed in Paris.
TRAVEL
By JOHN FLEMING and JOHN FLEMING,ST. PETERSBURG TIMES | July 23, 2006
MOZART WAS NOT A NATURE lover. On all his youthful travels by horse-drawn coach throughout Europe as a prodigy, he rarely commented on the landscape that he passed through in letters to family and friends. He loved cosmopolitan cities such as Paris, London and Vienna. Yet the closest I felt to Mozart on a recent trip to Austria came in a bucolic setting, the Monchsberg, a forested ridge above his hometown of Salzburg. I had spent the previous day and a half wandering around churches, cemeteries, a mansion and a fortress, all with connections to the composer.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Contributing writer | March 1, 1992
The St. Mary's College music department seems to have a thing for composers from Salzburg, Austria, whose names begin with "M."Last year in Annapolis, there was a delightful evening of Mozart, commemorating the bicentennial of the death of Salzburg's most talented son.This year, the St. Mary's College Choir, The Tidewater Ensemble and eight soloists came to venerable St. Anne's Church in Annapolis togive the U.S. premiere of "Missa in labore requires" (Mass...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | August 12, 2001
SALZBURG -- This is one of Austria's most tradition-conscious cities, a place where the face of history looks down from nearly every impeccably maintained building, a place where you can dine in a restaurant -- St. Peter Stiftskeller -- that has been serving continually for about 1,200 years now. With such a noble past, this pristine, picture-postcard spot inevitably exudes a certain air of primness and propriety. But beneath the surface lingers an old streak of irreverence. You can find it in St. Sebastian's Cemetery.
TRAVEL
November 16, 2008
Best European cities to visit 1 Florence, Italy 2 Rome 3 Salzburg, Austria 4 Venice, Italy 5 Vienna, Austria 6 Barcelona, Spain 7 Paris 8 Bruges, Belgium 9 Siena, Italy 10 Prague, Czech Republic Source: Conde Nast Travel Readers Choice Awards
NEWS
By Neal R. Peirce | April 7, 1997
SALZBURG, Austria -- Is the nation-state at the end of its 500-year run? Is it about to succumb to economic globalization, resurgent regions or ethnic and tribal rivalries?Neal R. Peirce writes a column on state and urban affairs.Pub Date: 4/03/97
TRAVEL
By San Jose (Calif.) Mercury News) | April 20, 2008
Can you recommend any family resorts that would provide a multigenerational vacation? Here are a few we can suggest: Hilton Hawaiian Village Beach Resort (hiltonhawaiianvillage.com) in Waikiki, Hawaii: There are plenty of programs and demonstrations on Hawaiian culture, and kids will enjoy the daily wildlife feedings of penguins, turtles, ibis and carp. While parents learn to make leis or play the ukulele (or just lounge on the beach), kids can join full- or half-day programs in the Express Keiki Club.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | August 12, 2001
SALZBURG -- This is one of Austria's most tradition-conscious cities, a place where the face of history looks down from nearly every impeccably maintained building, a place where you can dine in a restaurant -- St. Peter Stiftskeller -- that has been serving continually for about 1,200 years now. With such a noble past, this pristine, picture-postcard spot inevitably exudes a certain air of primness and propriety. But beneath the surface lingers an old streak of irreverence. You can find it in St. Sebastian's Cemetery.
FEATURES
By Edward Rothstein and Edward Rothstein,New York Times News Service | August 16, 1992
Towering above the Salzburg Festival concert halls is the Monchsberg, an enormous cliff. The theaters were originally going to be built on top of the mountain, where one can walk today on paved paths offering panoramic views of farms, valleys and the church spires of the old city.Instead, the connection to nature was made even more intimate: the theaters were built into the cliff's base. Fifty thousand tons of rock were blasted away to construct the Large Festival Hall in 1960.The oldest hall, called the Summer Riding School, was once an arena where bearbaiting and horse displays were presented for the local princely households.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Contributing writer | March 1, 1992
The St. Mary's College music department seems to have a thing for composers from Salzburg, Austria, whose names begin with "M."Last year in Annapolis, there was a delightful evening of Mozart, commemorating the bicentennial of the death of Salzburg's most talented son.This year, the St. Mary's College Choir, The Tidewater Ensemble and eight soloists came to venerable St. Anne's Church in Annapolis togive the U.S. premiere of "Missa in labore requires" (Mass...
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2007
Pulling their strings Experience Mozart like you never have before when the Salzburg Marionettes perform The Magic Flute. The troupe of puppeteers is from the famous Salzburg Marionette Theatre in Austria, and they stand above the stage, controlling near-life-size puppets with a variety of strings as the puppets perform operas, ballets and other interpretive dance. The troupe will also perform a one-hour abbreviated version of Engelbert Humperdinck's Hansel and Gretel. The Salzburg Marionettes will perform 7:30 p.m.-9:30 p.m. Saturday at Shriver Hall, 3400 Charles St. Admission is $19-$39.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | October 24, 1998
150 years ago in The Sun Oct. 25: RUNAWAY SLAVES -- On Saturday night, the 14th of October, two slaves, the property of Col. Miller and Major Rohrback, of Sharpsburg, Md., made tracks for Pennsylvania. They were arrested the next day (Sunday) in Chambersburg, Pa., and have since been placed in possession of their owners.100 years ago in The Sun Oct. 28: The question whether a girl who is obliged to support herself is better off in a store or factory than she is as a domestic is developing considerable interest.
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