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By Los Angeles Times | April 2, 1993
SAN SALVADOR, El Salvador -- Two army officers convicted in the 1989 murders of six Jesuit priests, their cook and her daughter were ordered released from prison yesterday as part of a new blanket amnesty sponsored by President Alfredo Cristiani.In response to U.S. pressure, however, government officials now say the amnesty, decreed last month for all Salvadorans guilty of war crimes, will not be granted to leftist guerrillas who killed U.S. servicemen during the conflict.The officers convicted in the Jesuits' murders, Col. Guillermo Alfredo Benavides and Lt. Yusshy Rene Mendoza, had been sentenced to 30 years in prison.
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NEWS
By Clifford Krauss and Clifford Krauss,New York Times News Service | March 21, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The Reagan administration knew more tha it publicly disclosed about some of the worst human rights abuses in El Salvador's civil war and withheld the information from Congress, declassified cables and interviews with former government officials indicate.Charges that the Reagan administration, and to a lesser extent the Carter and Bush administrations, may have covered up evidence of abuses to win congressional approval of about $6 billion in aid were revived with the release last week of a United Nations-sponsored report documenting widespread human rights violations by the Salvadoran military.
NEWS
By JORGE G. CASTANEDA | March 19, 1993
Princeton, New Jersey. -- The report of the U.N. Commission on the Truth in El Salvador is meant to be a forward-looking document: a necessary condition for pursuing the pacification, reconciliation and reform process set in motion by the peace agreements signed in January 1992. But the report is, necessarily, about the past: about the war that racked that small country for a decade.The commission blames the guerrillas for the murder of 11 mayors, as well as for a series of assassinations carried out by the rebels in the capital.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | December 14, 1992
SAN SALVADOR, El Salvador -- Forty-eight hours before the formal end to El Salvador's civil war, leftist guerrillas, government officials and mediators were locked in intense negotiations yesterday over important political reforms, including long-term security for former rebel fighters.The brinkmanship comes even as Vice President Dan Quayle and other regional leaders prepare to attend tomorrow's ceremony in San Salvador marking the conclusion of 12 years of war between rebels and U.S.-backed forces.
NEWS
December 13, 1992
Tuesday, El Salvador's Marxist rebels are to surrender the last of their arms bringing to a close a 12-year civil war that cost more than 70,000 lives and more than $4 billion in American taxpayers' money.In the days before the historic moment, Dr. Robert Kirschner, the deputy Cooke Country medical examiner, was putting together a puzzle of skull and bone.Dr. Kirschner and a colleague, Clyde Snow, a medical anthropologist from Oklahoma, had assembled similar puzzles in Argentina, Guatemala and South Korea.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Staff Writer | November 8, 1992
Call it the Chinese-Salvadoran connection.An ethnic marriage of convenience is flourishing in the Baltimore area's Chinese restaurants. Chinese restaurateurs are hiring Salvadorans as busboys, dishwashers and sometimes waiters and cooks.Miguel Angel Rivera, 39, was among the first Salvadorans to make the connection. In 1986, he came to a Chinese restaurant in Randallstown as a busboy."The first six months here I didn't see another Hispanic," Mr. Rivera says."I worked amid 10 Chinese guys.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 25, 1992
SAN SALVADOR, El Salvador -- A confidential list o Salvadoran officers to be purged from their military posts next month for reasons including human rights violations includes the defense minister, his deputy minister and more than 110 officers, according to people familiar with the list.The purge orders, seen as one of the most serious tests of civilian authority over the armed forces, have raised tensions to a new level here as a series of important deadlines, established in the peace accord reached last year, slip by."
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Staff Writer | June 14, 1992
Swamped with Salvadoran applicants seeking work-permit extensions, federal officials in Baltimore are telling the immigrants to apply by mail or consult non-profit agencies for help.Advocates praised the plan for saving Salvadorans, most of whom live in the Washington suburbs, a trip to Baltimore and for allowing the immigrants to keep their work permits while waiting for an extension. But they also said the plan burdens low-budget, non-profit agencies."All the administrative burden is being shifted from the INS [Immigration and Naturalization Service]
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Staff Writer | June 14, 1992
Swamped with Salvadoran applicants seeking work-permit extensions, federal officials in Baltimore are telling the immigrants to apply by mail or consult non-profit agencies for help.Advocates praised the plan for saving Salvadorans, most of whom live in the Washington suburbs, an unwanted trip to Baltimore and for allowing the immigrants to keep their work permits while waiting for an extension.But they also said the plan burdens low-budget, non-profit agencies."All the administrative burden is being shifted from the INS [Immigration and Naturalization Service]
NEWS
By Georgie Anne Geyer | April 7, 1992
THE LAST week of March, two D.C. City Council members took an interesting, unannounced trip to El Salvador.Frank Smith and Harry Thomas flew to San Salvador on March 23, without notifying either the American Embassy there or the Salvadoran Embassy here, and traveled around for a week, largely to formerly Marxist rebel-held territory.Members of the curious 16-member delegation, which included immigration activists from D.C., made it clear when they returned home a week later where their sympathies lay. They spoke of observing naked children running around town squares and of an undetonated bomb on church steps with the words on it: "Made in the U.S.A."
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