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June 27, 2008
On June 19, 2008 SALVADOR CRUZ LOPEZ. No viewing of remains. The family will receive friends at the CHATMAN-HARRIS FUNERAL HOME EAST, 4210 Belair Road Saturday 12 p.m. Memorial Services will begin at 12:30 p.m. Interment private.
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SPORTS
By Ryan Bacic and The Baltimore Sun | June 8, 2014
LANDOVER -  As the Spanish national soccer team headed into its final warm-up game before leaving for Brazil, and with one last chance to work out any kinks before setting out to defend its World Cup crown, manager Vicente del Bosque wanted his team to show him something. "The most important thing for us," del Bosque said at his news conference Friday, "is that the 23 players that we have are peaking at the right time for the World Cup. " Del Bosque's side did, in the end, secure a 2-0 win Saturday over El Salvador before an announced 53,267 at FedEx Field.
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NEWS
By Georgie Anne Geyer | October 7, 1991
Washington -- ALL DURING the Reagan presidential years, "E Salvador" became the incessant catchword among critics for everything that seemed wrong with U.S. policies in Central America. Under the Bush presidency, we exercise our short memories by forgetting it even exists.Yet, last month the terrible 12-year conflict in that crowded, tragic country of 4.5 million may finally have ended. And its GeorgieAnneGeyerending may point the way to solutions for other similarly tormented countries.This major security agreement signed on Sept.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2013
Julio T. "Speedy" Gonzalez, who had been honorary consul to El Salvador and a successful Baltimore shipping executive whose motto was "My sales territory is the entire world," died Thursday from complications of diabetes at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. He was 88. "Everyone knew Speedy because he was active in the port and attended all port events," said Helen Delich Bentley, the former congresswoman and chairwoman of the Federal Maritime Commission. "It was a small company but very active.
FEATURES
By Pamela Constable and Pamela Constable,Boston Globe | May 31, 1994
It was the most notorious open secret of a civil war rife with atrocity and cover-up: the reported army massacre of an entire hamlet in El Salvador, airily denied by the army and cynically papered over by U.S. officials determined not to let the excesses of their military wards undermine the crusade to stop communism in Central America.Despite newspaper accounts and eyewitness testimony, it took a decade for the full facts to emerge about what happened at El Mozote in December 1981.The story of that tortuous process makes Mark Danner's meticulous reconstruction of this war crime and its aftermath as instructive as it is horrifying to read.
NEWS
By Heather Tepe and Heather Tepe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 16, 2000
WHEN EMILIA Costa, a 17-year-old resident of Hickory Ridge, arrived in the small village of Santa Marta, El Salvador, last month, she said she felt like a "spectacle." "They had never seen people who looked like us," Emilia said. "We were bombarded by children, and they were staring. It was very warm but overwhelming." Emilia, a member of the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Columbia, joined a group of teens and chaperons from the River Road Unitarian Church in Bethesda for a two-week trip to El Salvador.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | January 15, 2001
Two Baltimore-based international relief organizations are sending money and workers to help with recovery efforts in the earthquake that shook Central America on Saturday. Kenneth F. Hackett, executive director of Baltimore-based Catholic Relief Services, said the organization's 20 staff members in San Salvador - four of them American - were reportedly unharmed and have been working with the Red Cross and Green Cross at rescue efforts in the Las Colinas neighborhood west of San Salvador, El Salvador's capital, where a landslide buried scores of houses.
NEWS
By FIONA NEILL | September 12, 1993
San Salvador. -- For 12 years left-wing rebels of the Farabundo Marti National Liberation Front (FMLN) waged one of Latin America's most successful guerrilla wars.Today, the former guerrillas have set up offices in middle-class neighborhoods in San Salvador and take business management courses funded by the U.S. government. Next March the FMLN -- former Marxist revolutionaries who eschewed electoral politics -- will run in general elections as a legal political party for the first time.The FMLN has won national and international respect for its role in consolidating peace in El Salvador.
NEWS
By Hugh Dellios and Hugh Dellios,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 25, 2004
SAN SALVADOR, El Salvador - President-elect Tony Saca has vowed to continue his predecessor's brotherly relationship with the United States, but that might not assure that El Salvador remains in the Bush administration's military coalition in Iraq. The token unit of 370 Salvadoran troops serving in the Middle East has become all the more important symbolically after Spain and Honduras said they probably would not renew their troop deployments in June. Nicaraguan troops pulled out last month.
TRAVEL
By Ann Schlott Hillers and Ann Schlott Hillers,Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2008
The flight attendant was skeptical. "You're getting off in El Salvador?" he asked. I nodded. "You don't need arrival forms if you are traveling on to Costa Rica," he said. "We're going to El Salvador," I told him. With some hesitation he handed me paperwork to enter the country. Our family of five, including three boys ages 4 to 7, was traveling to this Central American nation of 7 million, encouraged by a nonstop flight and the online discovery of a colonial town called Suchitoto. Blogs called it the next Antigua, Guatemala, or Granada, Nicaragua.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2013
After Jurgen Klinsmann took over the U.S. national soccer team nearly two years ago, the positive results were not immediate. As recently as late May, when the Americans lost a friendly to Belgium, there were questions about whether the former German star and coach was a good fit. While the 2013 CONCACAF Gold Cup is clearly not the World Cup in terms of competition or worldwide significance, Klinsmann's imprint is becoming apparent as the U.S....
SPORTS
By Jordan Littman and Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2013
Before playing El Salvador in the CONCACAF quarterfinals at M&T Bank Stadium, U.S. midfielder Mix Diskerud had some painful memories of last summer's 3-3 tie with the Central American team in the Under-23 Olympic qualifying team. The tying goal came four minutes into added time and cost the U.S. a spot in the London Games. Diskerud, playing with the U.S. national team this year for the first time, said after Sunday's 5-1 win that he still thinks about last summer's game. It doesn't help that a teammate from his club team in Norway, Jaime Alas , constantly sends him a reminder.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2013
After the U.S. men's national soccer team lost a friendly to Belgium in May, a disgusted coach Jurgen Klinsmann tried to talk about what positives the Americans could get out of the surprising defeat. “I'd rather play Belgium 10 more times than El Salvador for the 100 th time because that's where you learn,” Klinsmann said.  Klinsmann is hopeful that his team, which has won seven straight official games, is not given a similar lesson Sunday when it meets El Salvador in a 4 p.m. quarterfinal of the 2013 CONCACAF Gold Cup at M&T Bank Stadium.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2013
The U.S. men's national soccer team's first appearance in Baltimore since 1997 took a couple of interesting twists this week leading up to Sunday's CONCACAF Gold Cup quarterfinal against El Salvador at M&T Bank Stadium. The first came Wednesday when U.S. coach Jurgen Klinsmann was the only one of the managers in this grouping to fully exercise an option to make as many as four personnel changes. While that didn't come as a total surprise considering Klinsmann's willingness to work his roster around the needs of the players' club season, what seems a bit stunning is that Sunday's games will be played before a sellout crowd in excess of 71,000.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2010
In 10 short words, the United States government has given a Salvadoran family living in Maryland an unexpected gift — the assurance that it will not be torn apart by deportation. " DHS, hereby, moves to withdraw its appeal on this matter," wrote Nelson A. Vargas-Padilla, deputy chief counsel in the Department of Homeland Security's Baltimore office, on Nov. 18. With that terse statement, the government reversed its earlier decision to appeal an immigration judge's ruling that granted asylum to Maria Canales de Maldonado and her son, Pablo, 18. Mother and son fled a gang in El Salvador that killed another son and continued to menace the family.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,scott.calvert@baltsun.com | September 27, 2009
The 12-year-old boy's harrowing story tumbled out: Tormented by a gang in his native El Salvador. Sent by his terrified mother to sneak into the United States in search of safety. Nabbed by Border Patrol agents in Texas. Told he'd have to go back home, whatever the consequences. Santos Maldonado-Canales badly wanted to stay, and now, sitting in a plush Baltimore law firm in August 2008, his hopes rested with an earnest young lawyer. At 27, Azim Chowdhury was two years out of law school and knew nothing about immigration law. A partner at the Duane Morris firm had given him the case as part of its mission to offer free representation.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 3, 1998
SAN SALVADOR, El Salvador -- After 17 years of silence, all four of the former National Guardsmen convicted of killing three American nuns and a lay worker here in 1980 have said for the first time that they acted only after receiving "orders from above."The declarations, made from prison, are an important development in the case because El Salvador and the United States have always officially argued that the killers acted on their own. Human rights groups and relatives of the victims, however, have always maintained that the executions were ordered, approved and directed by the military authorities.
NEWS
By Sarah Park and Sarah Park,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 20, 2004
SAN MIGUEL, El Salvador - On Thursdays, she brings out the knife. The dull steak blade is part of an unimpressive array of tools - nose, fingers, plastic tub, afternoon sun - that Angela Maritza Carballo uses to detect contraband in packages being sent to the United States from this smallest of Central American countries. She is the sole inspector for Umana Express, one of hundreds of mom-and-pop courier services that have linked families in El Salvador and the United States for more than 20 years.
SPORTS
By From Sun staff and news services | June 4, 2009
Soccer Costa Rica beats U.S., 3-1, in World Cup qualifier Alvaro Saborio scored 79 seconds in, the second-fastest goal against the United States in a World Cup qualifier, and host Costa Rica coasted to a 3-1 victory Wednesday night in San Jose. Celso Borges added a goal in the 13th minute, and Pablo Herrera sealed the victory for 41st-ranked Costa Rica when he made it 3-0 in the 69th. Landon Donovan scored the U.S. goal when he converted a penalty kick in the second minute of second-half stoppage time.
NEWS
May 18, 2009
ISAAC LEVI Longtime Associated Press correspondent Isaac "Nick" Levi, who chronicled Latin America for the Associated Press during a wide-ranging four-decade career, died Friday of complications of pneumonia. He was 76. Levi joined the AP in Argentina in 1963 and worked there and in Uruguay until 1969. He became bureau chief in Santiago, Chile, covering the rise of leftist President Salvador Allende, before moving to head AP's Lima, Peru, bureau in 1973 as the region was wracked by coups and civil conflicts.
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