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By Robin Mather Jenkins and Robin Mather Jenkins,Chicago Tribune | December 6, 2006
Well, yes, you could just open a can. But homemade baked beans offer much, much more. They offer a connection to the past. One of my favorite food writers, Della Lutes, opens her 1935 classic The Country Kitchen with an accounting of her father's birthday feast in 1882: "A great pan of beans was baked, nice, white Michigan [or New York State] beans, soaked overnight, parboiled in the early morning with a pinch of soda, then washed in cold water and boiled again with a slab of salt pork and an onion, until the outer skin burst.
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NEWS
By Robin Mather Jenkins and Robin Mather Jenkins,Chicago Tribune | December 6, 2006
Well, yes, you could just open a can. But homemade baked beans offer much, much more. They offer a connection to the past. One of my favorite food writers, Della Lutes, opens her 1935 classic The Country Kitchen with an accounting of her father's birthday feast in 1882: "A great pan of beans was baked, nice, white Michigan [or New York State] beans, soaked overnight, parboiled in the early morning with a pinch of soda, then washed in cold water and boiled again with a slab of salt pork and an onion, until the outer skin burst.
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NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | February 11, 2004
Claudette Chambers of Baltimore requested recipes for real baked-in-the-oven baked beans. Louise Wagner of Sebastopol, Calif., responded with tester Laura Reiley's choice. Wagner wrote: "I found this in a Better Homes and Garden Best Budget Recipes magazine from 1973. Enjoy. We do." Boston Baked Beans Makes 8 servings 16 ounces (2 cups) dry navy beans 2 quarts cold water 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/2 cup molasses 1/3 cup packed brown sugar 1 teaspoon dry mustard 4 ounces salt pork 1 medium onion, chopped Rinse beans; add to water in saucepan.
NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | February 11, 2004
Claudette Chambers of Baltimore requested recipes for real baked-in-the-oven baked beans. Louise Wagner of Sebastopol, Calif., responded with tester Laura Reiley's choice. Wagner wrote: "I found this in a Better Homes and Garden Best Budget Recipes magazine from 1973. Enjoy. We do." Boston Baked Beans Makes 8 servings 16 ounces (2 cups) dry navy beans 2 quarts cold water 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/2 cup molasses 1/3 cup packed brown sugar 1 teaspoon dry mustard 4 ounces salt pork 1 medium onion, chopped Rinse beans; add to water in saucepan.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Sun Staff | February 17, 1999
Myron L. Steckman of Baltimore is ready for some corn bread made with canned whole-kernel corn. Lois Price of Black Butte Ranch, Ore., asked for a recipe for corn chowder with bits of ham in it -- like a dish that is famous in a Michigan restaurant she knows.Tester Laura Reiley chose a corn-bread recipe from Phyllis Bonacci of Duquesne, Pa. For the corn chowder, she picked a recipe sent in by Evelyn Dennett of Rapid City, S.D. It calls for salt pork. Dennett said she believes smoked ham could be substituted for the salt pork, and Reiley agreed.
FEATURES
By Steven Raichlen | September 22, 1991
Clam chowder is probably the nation's most famous chowder. It is traditionally made with quahogs -- large hard-shell clams -- but one could easily use littlenecks or cherrystones. The chowder below has two twists: bacon is added in addition to salt pork and fried julienned leeks are used as a garnish. The recipe comes from Ris Lacoste, chef at 21 Federal St. in Washington.White clam chowder with leeksServes 12.24 quahogs (3 cups clam meat and liquor)3 cups dry white wineapproximately 2 cups fish stock, clam broth, or water6 leeks, trimmed and washed2 onions4 stalks celery3 ounces salt pork6 strips of bacon1/3 cup flour3 large potatoes, peeled and dicedbouquet garni of bay leaf, thyme, and parsleysalt, pepper, and cayenne pepper2 cups peanut oil for frying the leeks1 cup heavy cream4 tablespoons finely chopped chives or parsley3 tablespoons butterScrub the quahogs and place them in a large, covered pot with the wine.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Sun Staff Writer | March 23, 1994
A littleneck clam mixed with a little bit of effort and even a skeptic will probably succumb to the finished product. Clam chowder, clam chowder, it is delicious.William Collevecchio of Baltimore wrote that he wanted a recipe for the chowder which he could "make on a conventional stove."Linda Peters of Columbia and Mrs. J. B. Duvall of Cockeysville sent in recipes using both a tomato base like a Manhattan clam chowder and using a milk base like New England clam chowder. Take your pick.Mrs.
FEATURES
By Gail Forman | June 30, 1991
For this year's Fourth of July menu, give up the "hot dogs, hamburgers, corn on the cob and ice cream" idea of tradition and take the advice Martha Washington offered women of her day: Rediscover the recipes of our Colonial ancestors.One person who took Martha Washington's advice to heart was Amelia Simmons, author of "American Cooking," considered the first truly American cookbook and a direct ancestor of "The Boston Cooking School Cook-Book" (1796). Her 47 pages of New England recipes highlight staples such as corn, beans, squash, potatoes, pumpkin and apples and dishes such as pumpkin pudding, ash cakes, slapjacks, Indian pudding, baked beans, roast game and boiled seafood.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | January 8, 1997
A great beef bourguignon can be unforgettable.But it is not always easy to reproduce. Toni Davis of Glen Burnie wrote, "Years ago there was a restaurant in Dundalk called the Brentwood Inn. They served a beef bourguignon [that] was the best I have ever had anywhere. I've tried recipes from lots of different cookbooks but cannot duplicate this version," she wrote.A recipe that chef Gilles Syglowski calls "very good," was sent in by Barbara Lee of Lutherville.Lee's beef bourguignon2 cups red wine1 carrot, sliced1 onion, sliced4 sprigs parsley1 clove garlic, minced2 tablespoons salad oil1 bay leaf1/8 teaspoon thyme1/2 teaspoon salt1/2 teaspoon pepper3 pounds chuck roast cut in 2-inch cubes2 tablespoons butter2 tablespoons flour1/2 cup beef consomme1/4 pound salt pork, diced24 small white onionsCombine first 10 ingredients in a large bowl and add beef.
FEATURES
By CATHY THOMAS | December 25, 1994
Enjoy the warmth you're feeling today -- that Christmas glow won't last. The holiday spirit will fade in a couple of days and then it will hit -- it's winter! Time for scarves, gloves, long johns, boots and bean soup. Growing up, my brothers and I relished bean-soup night -- a frequent cold-weather event when Dad took over the stove and rustled up a large pot brimming with white beans, chunks of vegetables and a meaty hambone.We swilled down this hearty concoction with delight while Dad pontificated about the virtues of the noble dried bean.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Sun Staff | February 17, 1999
Myron L. Steckman of Baltimore is ready for some corn bread made with canned whole-kernel corn. Lois Price of Black Butte Ranch, Ore., asked for a recipe for corn chowder with bits of ham in it -- like a dish that is famous in a Michigan restaurant she knows.Tester Laura Reiley chose a corn-bread recipe from Phyllis Bonacci of Duquesne, Pa. For the corn chowder, she picked a recipe sent in by Evelyn Dennett of Rapid City, S.D. It calls for salt pork. Dennett said she believes smoked ham could be substituted for the salt pork, and Reiley agreed.
FEATURES
By Eric Asimov and Eric Asimov,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 23, 1997
Vermont's gentle beauty reveals itself modestly as you thread your way by car over the rolling hills and streams, past white churches, village greens and town gazebos. Unlike the magnificence of a Pacific seascape, or the reverence inspired by the Rockies, this landscape offers tranquillity.And so it is with food. Vermont has no shortage of pretentious inns and restaurants, generally clustered around ski resorts and promising epicurean delights at New York prices. Their allegiance is not to durable, purposeful Vermont but to a tourist trade that wants to travel without leaving home.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | January 8, 1997
A great beef bourguignon can be unforgettable.But it is not always easy to reproduce. Toni Davis of Glen Burnie wrote, "Years ago there was a restaurant in Dundalk called the Brentwood Inn. They served a beef bourguignon [that] was the best I have ever had anywhere. I've tried recipes from lots of different cookbooks but cannot duplicate this version," she wrote.A recipe that chef Gilles Syglowski calls "very good," was sent in by Barbara Lee of Lutherville.Lee's beef bourguignon2 cups red wine1 carrot, sliced1 onion, sliced4 sprigs parsley1 clove garlic, minced2 tablespoons salad oil1 bay leaf1/8 teaspoon thyme1/2 teaspoon salt1/2 teaspoon pepper3 pounds chuck roast cut in 2-inch cubes2 tablespoons butter2 tablespoons flour1/2 cup beef consomme1/4 pound salt pork, diced24 small white onionsCombine first 10 ingredients in a large bowl and add beef.
FEATURES
By CATHY THOMAS | December 25, 1994
Enjoy the warmth you're feeling today -- that Christmas glow won't last. The holiday spirit will fade in a couple of days and then it will hit -- it's winter! Time for scarves, gloves, long johns, boots and bean soup. Growing up, my brothers and I relished bean-soup night -- a frequent cold-weather event when Dad took over the stove and rustled up a large pot brimming with white beans, chunks of vegetables and a meaty hambone.We swilled down this hearty concoction with delight while Dad pontificated about the virtues of the noble dried bean.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Sun Staff Writer | March 23, 1994
A littleneck clam mixed with a little bit of effort and even a skeptic will probably succumb to the finished product. Clam chowder, clam chowder, it is delicious.William Collevecchio of Baltimore wrote that he wanted a recipe for the chowder which he could "make on a conventional stove."Linda Peters of Columbia and Mrs. J. B. Duvall of Cockeysville sent in recipes using both a tomato base like a Manhattan clam chowder and using a milk base like New England clam chowder. Take your pick.Mrs.
FEATURES
By Steven Raichlen | September 22, 1991
Clam chowder is probably the nation's most famous chowder. It is traditionally made with quahogs -- large hard-shell clams -- but one could easily use littlenecks or cherrystones. The chowder below has two twists: bacon is added in addition to salt pork and fried julienned leeks are used as a garnish. The recipe comes from Ris Lacoste, chef at 21 Federal St. in Washington.White clam chowder with leeksServes 12.24 quahogs (3 cups clam meat and liquor)3 cups dry white wineapproximately 2 cups fish stock, clam broth, or water6 leeks, trimmed and washed2 onions4 stalks celery3 ounces salt pork6 strips of bacon1/3 cup flour3 large potatoes, peeled and dicedbouquet garni of bay leaf, thyme, and parsleysalt, pepper, and cayenne pepper2 cups peanut oil for frying the leeks1 cup heavy cream4 tablespoons finely chopped chives or parsley3 tablespoons butterScrub the quahogs and place them in a large, covered pot with the wine.
FEATURES
By Eric Asimov and Eric Asimov,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 23, 1997
Vermont's gentle beauty reveals itself modestly as you thread your way by car over the rolling hills and streams, past white churches, village greens and town gazebos. Unlike the magnificence of a Pacific seascape, or the reverence inspired by the Rockies, this landscape offers tranquillity.And so it is with food. Vermont has no shortage of pretentious inns and restaurants, generally clustered around ski resorts and promising epicurean delights at New York prices. Their allegiance is not to durable, purposeful Vermont but to a tourist trade that wants to travel without leaving home.
NEWS
By Christine Dobmeier, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2012
Each week a nutritionist from the University of Maryland Medical Center provides a guest post to The Baltimore Sun's health blog Picture of Health (baltimoresun.com/pictureofhealth). This week, Christine Dobmeier, RD CSR LDN, weighs in on the 1812 diet. Baltimore is embarking on the bicentennial celebration of the War of 1812. With the focus on history with the upcoming events around town, it's interesting to think about how people in 1812 lived their everyday lives, including what they ate. Were their diets similar to ours or drastically different?
FEATURES
By Gail Forman | June 30, 1991
For this year's Fourth of July menu, give up the "hot dogs, hamburgers, corn on the cob and ice cream" idea of tradition and take the advice Martha Washington offered women of her day: Rediscover the recipes of our Colonial ancestors.One person who took Martha Washington's advice to heart was Amelia Simmons, author of "American Cooking," considered the first truly American cookbook and a direct ancestor of "The Boston Cooking School Cook-Book" (1796). Her 47 pages of New England recipes highlight staples such as corn, beans, squash, potatoes, pumpkin and apples and dishes such as pumpkin pudding, ash cakes, slapjacks, Indian pudding, baked beans, roast game and boiled seafood.
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