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By Lita Solis-Cohen and Sally Solis-Cohen and Lita Solis-Cohen and Sally Solis-Cohen,Contributing Writers | July 18, 1993
Summer barbecues aren't where most folks imagine finding hot collectibles, but next time you reach for salt and pepper to sprinkle on the corn, check out the shakers. You might be holding pots of gold. They might be 6-inch-long Japanese ceramic figures of naked sun bathers with "his" and "hers" towels over their loins, a small, mechanical, plastic lawn mower with two shaker pistons, ceramic watermelon slices, miniature lobster claws, sailboats or even Mickey and Minnie Mouse dressed as chefs in aprons and toques.
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NEWS
Kit Waskom Pollard | April 25, 2014
In Maryland, one true harbinger of spring is fresh local asparagus. At Mountain Branch Grille & Pub, executive chef Lee Glanville pairs crunchy grilled stalks of the vegetable with seared scallops, bright corn relish and a smoky and savory tomato vinaigrette. The result is a riot of colors and flavors celebrating the return of spring. SEARED SCALLOPS WITH ASPARAGUS, CORN RELISH AND SMOKED TOMATO VINAIGRETTE Serves four Scallops and asparagus: 12 U/10 dry pack diver scallops Salt and pepper to taste 4 Tablespoons olive oil, divided 3 Tablespoons unsalted butter 20 large asparagus spears, trimmed for grilling 2 cups corn relish 1 cup smoked tomato vinaigrette 1. Prepare grill to cook over high heat.
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NEWS
By Jim Coleman and Candace Hagan and Jim Coleman and Candace Hagan,Knight Ridder / Tribune | March 20, 2005
My Grandmother used to make oxtail soup, but it was thick like a stew. I would like to re-create the dish, but I have no idea where to start. In fact, I have no idea what an oxtail even is. Today, the majority of "oxtails" are simply the tails of cows, but they will work just fine in the re-creation of your grandmother's soup. The only secret I have to share about it if you use another recipe is to blanch them first in a very flavorful liquid. Then cool them down and begin your recipe at that point.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2012
Joann Pelikan from Baltimore was hoping to locate a recipe for a dish she called Spanish steak. She said she enjoyed eating this when she was growing up in the 1960s and described it as steak that was slow-cooked with green pepper, onions and ketchup to yield a tender piece of meat with a tasty sauce. Mary Rostek from Perry Hall thought Pelikan's request sounded very much like the steak Creole she has been making since she was married in 1948. Her recipe calls for using individual cubed steaks that are made from beef that is taken from the top or bottom round and tenderized (or cubed)
FEATURES
December 26, 1990
This delicious, filling recipe takes about 20 minutes to prepare and one hour to cook, perfect for long, cold winter nights.Chuckwagon Beef Stew 1 pound beef round, cut into 3/4 -inch cubesSalt and pepper1 tablespoon vegetable oil1 large onion, coarsely chopped1 garlic clove, minced1/2 teaspoon marjoram1 bay leaf1 pound red potatoes, cut into one-inch chunks2 large carrots, thickly sliced1/4 pound green beans, cut into 1-inch lengthsSeason beef lightly with...
NEWS
By Annette Gooch and Annette Gooch,Universal Press Syndicate | January 30, 2000
Long before there were climate-controlled crispers, the root cellar kept the kitchen supplied with fresh vegetables during the cold months. Carrots, beets and other edible roots are still good keepers, staying crisp and sweet for weeks if properly stored. Shredded or diced for salads, their fresh color and flavor brighten winter meals. In this recipe, the earthy sweetness of the beets balances the slight bitterness of the endive and the tang of the vinaigrette. This dressing is thicker than most vinaigrettes.
FEATURES
By Sherrie Clinton and Sherrie Clinton,Evening Sun Staff | September 4, 1991
GUY REINBOLD, EXECUTIVE chef at the Stouffer Harborplace Hotel, has got 2,000 people coming to dinner Saturday night but he's not worried. In his ready room, tucked away in the Stouffer kitchens, Reinbold's got charts, seating plans, lists, day-by-day schedules and all the other paraphernalia needed to bring off what is certain to be one of Baltimore's most glittering fundraisers.The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's gala, with ticket prices ranging from $100 to $500 per person, will be held throughout The Gallery at Harborplace and the Stouffer ballrooms.
NEWS
By Linda Gassenheimer and Linda Gassenheimer,McClatchy-Tribune | April 9, 2008
Herb-crusted lamb steaks served on a bed of creamy spinach is a perfect dish for any weeknight. Tender, juicy lamb steaks are cut through the leg to make a piece of meat 3/4 -inch to 1-inch thick with a slice of bone in the center. If you don't see it in the meat case, ask the butcher to cut it for you. Lamb goes best with Spanish rioja. Florentine Lamb Serves 2 3 medium garlic cloves, crushed 2 teaspoons chopped dried rosemary 2 tablespoons plain bread crumbs salt and freshly ground pepper olive-oil spray 2 (6- to 7-ounce)
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 6, 1997
"A program for rational entertaining in an irrational age" is Molly O'Neill's stated mantra in her new book, "The Pleasure of Your Company" (Viking, 1997).This delectable recipe from her book can be served as an entree or alongside grilled fish or chicken. A full-bodied Greek-style salad is suggested for our menu in keeping with a vegetarian theme. For dessert, serve fresh pineapple slices tossed with honey and lime.Couscous-stuffed eggplantServes 44 small Asian or Italian eggplants3 cups cooked couscous4 plum tomatoes, diced3 cloves garlic, minced1/4 cup pine nuts, toasted2 tablespoons fresh cilantro, chopped1/2 jalapeno pepper, finely chopped1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice1 teaspoon ground cuminsalt and pepper to tasteHeat oven to 425 degrees.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | August 10, 1994
I have never met a combination salt shaker and pepper grinder that I liked.By itself, a salt shaker is a practical kitchen helper. The same can be said for a pepper mill. But when the two get together, it's like Abbott joining up with Costello, Beavis with Butt-head. The result is trouble.The pepper mill stops grinding and when, in anger, you turn the device over to examine the bottom of the grinder, the salt pours out the top. It is one of life's minor, but persistent, frustrations. You would think that a society that has come up with the microwave oven, the frost-free refrigerator and the cupcake with the creamy surprise inside could come up with a dependable combination salt shaker and pepper mill.
NEWS
By Linda Gassenheimer and Linda Gassenheimer,McClatchy-Tribune | May 13, 2009
Savor a taste of Italy in only minutes with fish fillets topped with fresh tomato slices and melted parmesan cheese. Penne pasta tossed with fresh spinach completes this colorful dinner. Buy whatever white fish looks best at the market or use flash-frozen fillets, which I've found have a fresh flavor. Measure the thickness of the fish and cook 10 minutes per inch. Wine suggestion: I'd sip a nice Italian chianti. spinach penne pasta Cook: 10 minutes Makes: 2 servings 1/4 pound penne pasta 4 cups washed, ready-to-eat spinach 2 teaspoons olive oil salt and freshly ground pepper Bring 3 to 4 quarts of water to a boil in a large pot. Cook pasta 10 minutes or according to package instructions.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,kate.shatzkin@baltsun.com | October 22, 2008
Keep this recipe handy for post-Thanksgiving leftovers - it'll take care of your extra turkey meat and any stray sweet potatoes. It works for brunch or dinner. And, even if it's not Thanksgiving and you're buying a pre-cooked turkey breast on sale, it's economical. shopping list Sweet potatoes: $1 Butter: 12 cents Olive oil: 34 cents Red onion: 50 cents Red bell pepper: $1.99 Turkey breast: $6.99 Eggs: 67 cents From the pantry: salt, pepper TOTAL: $11.61* Note: Prices are based on the amount of each ingredient used in the recipe.
NEWS
By Joe Gray and Joe Gray,Chicago Tribune | July 30, 2008
Tacos are a traditional food of Mexico, sure, but they also provide a canvas for endless improvisation. This version is mostly true to its roots until you get to the topping, flavored with North African harissa. Made with red chiles, spices and oil, the sauce delivers a spiciness that can vary in heat levels. Stirred into mayonnaise, an idea borrowed from Wave Restaurant in Chicago, it makes a crowd-pleasing dip for fingerling potatoes or a topping for just about any savory dish, such as these tacos.
NEWS
By Linda Gassenheimer and Linda Gassenheimer,McClatchy-Tribune | April 9, 2008
Herb-crusted lamb steaks served on a bed of creamy spinach is a perfect dish for any weeknight. Tender, juicy lamb steaks are cut through the leg to make a piece of meat 3/4 -inch to 1-inch thick with a slice of bone in the center. If you don't see it in the meat case, ask the butcher to cut it for you. Lamb goes best with Spanish rioja. Florentine Lamb Serves 2 3 medium garlic cloves, crushed 2 teaspoons chopped dried rosemary 2 tablespoons plain bread crumbs salt and freshly ground pepper olive-oil spray 2 (6- to 7-ounce)
NEWS
By Renee Enna | April 2, 2008
The blank canvas of a pizza crust lends itself to a vegetarian supper. Fresh tarragon provides a peppery kick, and packaged, thinly sliced almonds deliver crunch and a good source of protein. As for the tomatoes, we're using tangy Campari. We're starting with a prebaked crust (we especially like the unseasoned Mama Mary's version), but feel free to use the ready-made dough sold at many specialty grocers. Remember: Thinner dough cooks faster and has fewer calories. Renee Enna writes for the Chicago Tribune, which provided the recipe analysis.
NEWS
By [ELIZABETH LARGE] | March 30, 2008
SANDY'S BARGAIN CENTER 1029 W. 36th St., Hampden / / 410-235-3848 / / Open Monday through Saturday 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sunday 10 a.m.-5 p.m. ........................ THINK OF SANDY'S BARGAIN CENter as the Wal-Mart of Hampden, only locally owned and without the employee issues. Plus, you get all the funky charm you've come to love and expect from this neighborhood. Owner Sandy Piper relocated her shop to this spot recently because, as she says, "The Avenue is where it's at." Now that 36th Street has so many antiques stores, specialty boutiques and restaurants, she adds, there's nothing quite like her store on Hampden's main street.
NEWS
By Newsday | January 28, 2007
The sweet flavor of oranges in this dish is balanced by a fairly assertive mustard flavor. If you prefer mustard to be less prominent, cut back to 2 teaspoons. Six cups of cabbage may seem like a lot, but bear in mind that it "shrinks" once dressed, and you'll end up with about 4 cups of salad. When you want orange segments, first peel an orange. Use a small paring knife to cut on each side of the membranes; wedge-shaped segments will pop right out. ORANGE COLESLAW Serves 6 1/2 cup light mayonnaise 1 tablespoon cider vinegar 1 tablespoon prepared yellow mustard 1 teaspoon sugar 1 teaspoon grated orange zest 1/4 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper 6 cups shredded cabbage segments from 2 medium oranges, coarsely chopped Combine the mayonnaise, vinegar, mustard, sugar, orange zest, salt and pepper in a small bowl.
FEATURES
April 10, 1991
The Mushroom Council says button or medium-sized mushrooms are best for sauteing and for slicing in salads. Large mushrooms work well for stuffing, broiling, grilling, or as an ingredient in stews and soups.When shopping, look for firm mushrooms. If you want young mushrooms, look for those with the veil -- the membrane between the stem and cap -- still attached. Open-veiled mushrooms are still delicious -- just more mature, the Mushroom Council says.Garden Baked Potatoes2 tablespoons olive oil8 ounces fresh mushrooms, sliced1 small red bell pepper, seeded and cut into 1-inch squares1 large clove garlic, minced2 tablespoons water1 1/2 tablespoons lemon juiceSalt and pepper, to taste2 baked potatoes (about 6 ounces each)
NEWS
By Joe Gray and Joe Gray,Chicago Tribune | March 5, 2008
This pasta dish features Italian flavors, but I'm sure many would point out that Italians don't put chicken in their pasta dishes. Instead, they would serve it as a second course. But who has time to eat that way on busy weeknights? So this recipe incorporates quickly sauteed chicken, using easy-to-cut-up tenders. To save money, you can use whole chicken breasts and cut them up yourself. Buy good-quality pitted olives by-the-pound at the olive bars featured in many supermarkets. Joe Gray writes for the Chicago Tribune, which provided the recipe analysis.
NEWS
By Joe Gray and Joe Gray,Chicago Tribune | December 5, 2007
The small fruit of the towering date palm tree grows in large bunches of more than 20 pounds, with up to 1,000 dates per bunch. According to The Oxford Companion to Food, by Alan Davidson, dates are originally from North Africa and the Middle East, but most dates sold in the United States are grown in California, where they flourish in very hot, desert conditions. The fruit is 1 to 2 inches long, thin-skinned, with a soft, yielding, very sweet flesh wrapped around a long, narrow pit. Dates have a high sugar content, making them a good source of energy with no fat. They also provide some fiber, protein and vitamin A, and a good bit of potassium.
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