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NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,SUN STAFF | October 29, 2004
Those wishing for a white Christmas might end up with a blue one this year. Proving that it is never too early to start fretting about snow, Baltimore announced yesterday a new weapon in its winter arsenal: blue salt. It is test-driving the blue road salt, and some green as well, not so much to fight ice but to cool people's complaints about tardy snow removal. Officials said they're frustrated each winter with people who call the city to complain that plows haven't been down their street - even when they have.
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FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
Everyone wanted to hang out with John Waters this week. First the members of Future Islands spent time with the Baltimore filmmaker before they played at Hampdenfest Saturday.  Then Patton Oswalt invited him for a drink Sunday. The comedian posted this message on Twitter: "Hey John Waters: I'm at Salt on Pratt St. in Butcher's Hill. I'll be here for the next hour. Drop in, I'll buy you a Clear Eye Susan. " Waters likes to push boundaries in his work, but when it comes to social networking, he likes to do it the old-fashioned way -- in person.  But Rachel Whang, the co-owner of Atomic Books, spotted Oswalt's tweet and passed the message along to Waters.
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ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2013
Jason Ambrose, the co-owner and founding chef of Salt, has agreed to purchase a tavern on Haubert Street in Locust Point. "It won't be anything restaurant-y like Salt," Ambrose said. "It will be a 'bar with food'. " There isn't enough room inside the small establishment for tables, he said After seven years running the kitchen at Salt, Ambrose turned over Salt 's day-to-day kitchen operations to Brian Lavin. Ambrose won't close on the property until early November, he said, and the liquor board must approve the transfer of the liquor license to Ambrose from the property's current owners, Inga and Adam Gardner, who operate a bar a the location named The House.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2014
When Samantha Kuczynski contemplated the biggest dietary problem in her lunch recently, she didn't point to the chicken wrap sandwich or the french fries. It was the dollop of ketchup that caught the eye of the 24-year-old Center Stage props artisan, who was eating outside recently. The World Health Organization has identified "hidden" sugars in processed foods as a major threat to people's weight and teeth - the condiment contains about a teaspoon of sugar in every tablespoon - and the agency proposed earlier this month that people limit the sweetener to just six teaspoons daily.
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick
and The Baltimore Sun
| May 1, 2013
After seven years running his own kitchen at Salt, his Upper Fells Point restaurant that put duck fat fries, Wagyu sliders and changing menus on Baltimore's food map, Jason Ambrose is stepping aside. Ambrose is turning over Salt 's day-to-day kitchen operations to Brian Lavin, who joined the Salt team in 2010 and has been its sous-chef for about a year and a half, according to Ambrose. "I made a decision I was going to take a step out," said Ambrose. "Brian came to me as a line cook with a tremendous interest in food.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | meredith.cohn@baltsun.com | January 22, 2010
The cooks at the Manna House soup kitchen in Baltimore routinely prepare low-salt meals, only to watch most of those sitting at the tables reach for the salt shaker. But that ingrained habit could be broken as the Baltimore Health Department teams up with Manna House and others in an educational program to curb consumption of the mineral so closely linked to cardiovascular disease, the nation's No. 1 killer and an especially intractable problem in poorer neighborhoods. Proponents of the effort say a modest reduction in salt consumption could save 700 lives here a year.
FEATURES
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2013
After seven years running his own kitchen at Salt , his Upper Fells Point restaurant that put duck-fat fries, Wagyu sliders and changing menus on Baltimore's food map, Jason Ambrose is stepping aside. Ambrose is turning over Salt's day-to-day kitchen operations to Brian Lavin, who joined the Salt team in 2010 and has been the restaurant's sous-chef for about a year and a half, according to Ambrose. "I made a decision I was going to take a step out," said Ambrose. "Brian came to me as a line cook with a tremendous interest in food.
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
Everyone wanted to hang out with John Waters this week. First the members of Future Islands spent time with the Baltimore filmmaker before they played at Hampdenfest Saturday.  Then Patton Oswalt invited him for a drink Sunday. The comedian posted this message on Twitter: "Hey John Waters: I'm at Salt on Pratt St. in Butcher's Hill. I'll be here for the next hour. Drop in, I'll buy you a Clear Eye Susan. " Waters likes to push boundaries in his work, but when it comes to social networking, he likes to do it the old-fashioned way -- in person.  But Rachel Whang, the co-owner of Atomic Books, spotted Oswalt's tweet and passed the message along to Waters.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2012
It's Wednesday night in Upper Fells Point and I'm sitting at the bar of the restaurant Salt. The restaurant has entered its chilled-out mode; dinner service ends in a half-hour at 10:30 p.m. A jazzy score - Charles Mingus and Roy Hargrove - murmurs in the background, and a mute TV is ignored in a far corner. A dozen or so green-colored lamps that look like a squadron of flying saucers give the bar a cool, moody glow. Though the atmosphere is serene, the bar, which seats about 12, is full.
NEWS
By Lisa Schwarzbaum and Lisa Schwarzbaum,Special to the Sun | March 9, 1997
"Salt," by Earl Lovelace. Persea Books. 260 pages. $22.95.In an ideal bookshop, something as fragrant as Trinidadian writer Earl Lovelace's newest novel would come boxed together with a packet of spices, a CD of West Indian music and a string hammock in which to swing as the author's melodious riffs and billows of language propel this lovely, passionate story on its gentle course.As it is, you can almost-almost-sniff the scents of Lovelace's home island in this busy and satisfying story - a "political" novel in which everyday human hubbub speaks as eloquently as any political oration.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2014
A relentless winter has left local governments scrambling to replenish their supplies of road salt and some consumers finding empty shelves when they turn to hardware stores for ice-melting materials. State officials say they have enough salt to meet immediate needs, but at least one county was rationing its use Monday to stretch existing supplies, and local government spending for salt has climbed drastically from recent years. Even before this week's snow, Baltimore County road crews had spread about three times the salt used to improve traction and melt snow and ice on roads last year - about 108,000 tons compared with about 37,000.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2014
Stores in the Baltimore area have reported a shortage in rock salt supply leading up to a storm that could bring half a foot of snow across the region. Residents buying up the salt for their sidewalks and driveways to combat recent snow and ice have caused eight or nine Home Depot stores in the area to run low, a supervisor at the chain's Catonsville location said. While commercial shelves are bare, the state's supplies are in good shape - the State Highway Administration, which maintains all numbered routes across Maryland, estimated that its salt stockpiles are around 80 percent.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | January 23, 2014
Ed Levy from Baltimore was hoping I would be able to get the recipe for the salted chocolate caramel pie that he and his wife so enjoyed at Bottega, the new restaurant located in the Station North neighborhood in Baltimore. It was one of two desserts on the menu the night he and his wife dined there with friends, and they all thought it was one of the single best desserts they had ever had. They ordered one slice to share and liked it so much they asked for a second. I contacted Adrien Aeschliman, the chef-owner of Bottega, and he graciously provided me with his recipe for the pie. He said he adapted it from a recipe from Marlow & Sons restaurant in Brookyln, N.Y. This deliciously decadent creation may not be for the inexperienced cook.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | December 16, 2013
Icy conditions and crashes were reported on several Harford County roads overnight Sunday, the Harford County Department of Emergency Services said. The State Highway Administration encountered icy conditions on several roads it maintains in Harford. County government and Harford County Public opened at their normal times Monday morning and roads were largely clear of ice in time for the morning rush Monday, emergency services spokesman Bob Thomas said. "Spotty patches of ice but for the most part traffic is moving at the posted speed limits," Thomas said at about 10:15 a.m. "The Emergency Operations Center was not activated over the weekend for Saturday's snow event.  [The Department of Emergency Services is]
NEWS
December 11, 2013
I was particularly pleased to read Gregory Wilburn's letter advocating for the state to rein in the use of road salt ( "Road salt is killing Garrett County," Dec. 7). Sellers of road salt have long promoted it as a "cheap" solution to melt snow and ice. However, independent studies have shown that government use actually costs about $1,200 per ton in infrastructure damage - in addition to the upfront expense and shipping costs. The studies flagged deteriorating infrastructure, polluted water sources and contaminated soil - all at taxpayers expense.
NEWS
December 10, 2013
On Sunday morning, I ventured out to do my grocery shopping before the snow storm arrived. Being a native of Western New York, I favor the familiar offerings of Wegmans, so I have little difficulty justifying the drive from Baltimore to Columbia every week. As I was leaving the store, the snow had begun in Columbia, and I anticipated some slow going for the drive home. I progressed up Route 29, and the snow became heavier to the point of obscuring the lane lines. People from snowy areas would not call this heavy snow since visibility was still fair, but it was persistent and a healthy amount creating challenging driving conditions.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Donna Crivello and By Donna Crivello,Special to the Sun | January 6, 2002
Salt: A World History, by Mark Kurlansky. Walker & Company. 484 pages. $28. Do we really know about salt? There it sits rather meekly on the dining table sharing a position with pepper. We reach for it to make our food taste better, even though we're cautioned against it, and some of us have recently found new respect for its pure form: fleur de sel. Perhaps some our sketchy memory of history might bring up the salt wars, or even Gandhi's salt marches. From earliest recorded history, salt was at the center of the world economy.
NEWS
By Katherine Richards and Katherine Richards,Staff Writer | January 26, 1994
As yet another winter storm bore down on the mid-Atlantic states yesterday, Carroll highway officials said they were running out of road salt.Several municipalities and Carroll County Public Schools also faced shortages because they depend upon the county for their salt supply."
NEWS
December 7, 2013
The Maryland State Highway Administration is destroying Mountain Maryland. During the winter of 2012, the agency applied 48,352 tons of salt on 600 lane-miles of highway in Garrett County. That is more than 80 tons per lane-mile of highway. During the same winter, the Upper Peninsula of Michigan received 305 inches of snowfall - 50 percent more than Garrett County - yet used only 24 tons of salt per lane-mile. Other locations, such as Minnesota and Maine, used only 10 to12 tons per lane mile during the same season.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2013
Jason Ambrose, the co-owner and founding chef of Salt , has agreed to purchase a tavern on Haubert Street in Locust Point. "It won't be anything restaurant-y like Salt," Ambrose said. "It will be a 'bar with food.' " There isn't enough room inside the small establishment for tables, he said After seven years running the kitchen at Salt, Ambrose turned over day-to-day kitchen operations to Brian Lavin . Ambrose won't close on the property until early November, he said, and the liquor board must approve the transfer of the liquor license to Ambrose from the property's current owners, Inga and Adam Gardner, who operate a bar at the location named The House . Ambrose said he hopes to have the Locust Point bar open in early 2014.
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