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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | November 24, 1991
Richard Strauss' "Salome" is the opera for people who hate opera -- it's non-stop action, violence and lurid sex in a single 90-minute act. It's as scary and bloody as the best Brian DePalma movies and as kitschy as one by Cecil B. DeMille -- Salome's striptease leads to the beheading of John the Baptist. No wonder sopranos, conductors and record companies love it.The latest entries in the "Salome" sweepstakes come from Deutsche Grammophon and Sony Classical. The former features Giuseppe Sinopoli conducting the orchestra of the German Opera of Berlin and a cast headed by the young American soprano, Cheryl Studer; the latter has Zubin Mehta conducting the Berlin Phiharmonic and a cast that stars Eva Marton in the title role.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2014
Richard Strauss never lacks for attention, but the 150th anniversary of his birth this year offers a good excuse to get even more immersed in his brilliant music. The National Symphony Orchestra has gone all out honoring the composer. A couple weeks ago, there was a sizzling semi-staged version of "Der Rosenkavalier" featuring an exceptional cast. Over the weekend, there was an all-Strauss program that included more opera -- the Recognition Scene from "Elektra" and the finale to "Salome.
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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | August 6, 1995
Richard Strauss, "Salome," performed by Christoph Von Dohnanyi conducting the Vienna Philharmonic; Catherine Malfitano (Salome), Bryn Terfel (Jochanaan), Herod (Kenneth Riegel), Herodias (Hanna Schwarz), Narraboth (Kim Begley), London 444 178-2. Strauss, "Salome," performed by Seiji Ozawa conducting the Dresden State Orchestra; Jessye Norman (Salome), James Morris (Jochanaan), Herod (Walter Raffeiner), Herodias (Kerstin Witt), Narraboth (Richard Leech), Philips 432 153-2.These competing versions of "Salome" each have something to sell: Philips has Jessye Norman in the title role; London has Christoph Von Dohnanyi conducting.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel, assistant editor, b | June 17, 2012
Think Dick Cheney's thoughts on torture are extreme? Meet the Authority. Meet them and be afraid. Very afraid. Because underneath the sheen of gentility, bureaucratic formalities and a really sweet reception area, the Authority is pretty vicious.  Indeed, Nan Flanagan was murdered and they want to get the bottom of it. But seriously, silver pulsating through Bill and Eric's veins during interrogation? Whatever happened to we want to live with the humans peacefully?  The bulk of the second episode of the season was set at the Vampire Authority headquarters in what appears to be an underground labyrinth of a warehouse (it's super dark)
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,sun music critic | January 20, 2007
Seeking an escape from the at-long-last cold front? You need head no farther south than Washington, where the National Symphony Orchestra is offering a sizzling concert version of Richard Strauss' Salome. Thursday night's performance at the Kennedy Center easily added up to one of the season's hottest events, and the repeats today and Monday have "don't miss" written all over them. Salome will be repeated at 1:30 p.m. today and 8 p.m. Monday at the Kennedy Center Concert Hall, Virginia and New Hampshire avenues Northwest, Washington.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 15, 2004
Within the span of about 90 minutes, Richard Strauss' Salome encapsulates the eternal tug of war between good and evil - and many gray shades in between. This 1905 opera, like the Oscar Wilde play that inspired it, provides a hallucinatory take on the familiar Bible story, creating a high-sensory realm where ideals and desires collide and collapse. Like a colossal car wreck, the appalling sight at the end has audiences craning their necks to see; it's impossible to look away. The Baltimore Opera Company's production of Salome reconfirms the work's strange pull.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | January 24, 2003
Ataste of tragedy, comedy and psycho-sexuality is in store for the Baltimore Opera Company's audiences during the 2003-2004 season. The total dosage of operatic fare will be smaller - four productions instead of the current five. Like most other arts organizations in the country, the company is feeling the pinch of harder economic times. It also has been dealing with considerable uncertainty over the start of planned renovations at the Lyric Opera House. "We thought we would have to leave the theater in March 2004," BOC general director Michael Harrison said, "so that complicated everything.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | April 12, 2002
Long before the dawn of shock movies, there was shock opera. Nearly a century later, Richard Strauss' Salome can still stun and inflame the senses. Things certainly get pretty hot in the Washington Opera's production at the Kennedy Center. It offers a physically ideal soprano who truly inhabits the title role and an unabashed emphasis on the raw sexual current that relentlessly propels Salome to its gruesome conclusion. Slyvie Valayre's voice cannot always slice through Strauss' beefy orchestra or produce a tingly sensation with its tonal brilliance.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 11, 2004
Dance for me, Salome." With that seemingly innocent request, Herod Antipas, Tetrarch of Judea, unleashes not only a famously diaphanous display, but a force of imposing evil. By agreeing to her lecherous stepfather's request, Salome gains access to the thing she most covets - the head of John the Baptist on a silver charger. Her Dance of the Seven Veils represents one of the ultimate exercises in decadence, which no doubt explains why it has been immortalized so brilliantly in literature, art and music.
NEWS
September 8, 1996
Ljuba Welitsch,83, a Bulgarian-born soprano renowned for her interpretation of Richard Strauss' "Salome," died Sept. 1 in Vienna.Born Ljuba Velickova, Welitsch rose to stardom in her debut, a special performance of "Salome" to celebrate Strauss' 80th birthday at the Vienna State Opera.Welitsch won praise for performing the title roles of "Aida" and "Tosca," and Tatyana in "Eugene Onegin." She also gained fame for her interpretation of Donna Anna in "Don Giovanni."Lelooska,63, a master carver and storyteller who dedicated much of his life to the preservation of Northwest American Indian culture, died Thursday in Ariel, Wash.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,sun music critic | January 20, 2007
Seeking an escape from the at-long-last cold front? You need head no farther south than Washington, where the National Symphony Orchestra is offering a sizzling concert version of Richard Strauss' Salome. Thursday night's performance at the Kennedy Center easily added up to one of the season's hottest events, and the repeats today and Monday have "don't miss" written all over them. Salome will be repeated at 1:30 p.m. today and 8 p.m. Monday at the Kennedy Center Concert Hall, Virginia and New Hampshire avenues Northwest, Washington.
SPORTS
By Ryan Young and Ryan Young,SUN STAFF | July 13, 2004
In time, Salome Devidze hopes to be among the top 20 women's tennis players in the world, competing for big prize money on the sport's grandest stages. In time. This week, the 18-year-old is in Baltimore for the Holabird Sports 10K, a United States Tennis Association satellite tournament at Druid Hill Park, where the top prize is less than $2,000 and at times the cheering section yesterday consisted only of her mother. It's a start. But considering the alternative, the setting is just fine with Devidze, the tournament's No. 3 seed, who has been playing tennis since she was 6. Without a chance encounter almost a decade ago, she wouldn't even be in Baltimore this week.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 16, 2004
With congressional hearings on indecency leading to new protections of public sensibilities (at least on TV and radio), and a hit, Bible-based movie generating vociferous debate on anti-Semitism and artistic license, it couldn't be a better time to encounter Richard Strauss' opera Salome or Bach's St. John Passion. Both works - the Baltimore Opera Company has a well-worth-catching production of Salome running through Sunday; the Annapolis Chorale will perform the Bach piece on Saturday - raise some of the same issues that have been swirling around Mel Gibson's The Passion of the Christ.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 15, 2004
Within the span of about 90 minutes, Richard Strauss' Salome encapsulates the eternal tug of war between good and evil - and many gray shades in between. This 1905 opera, like the Oscar Wilde play that inspired it, provides a hallucinatory take on the familiar Bible story, creating a high-sensory realm where ideals and desires collide and collapse. Like a colossal car wreck, the appalling sight at the end has audiences craning their necks to see; it's impossible to look away. The Baltimore Opera Company's production of Salome reconfirms the work's strange pull.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 11, 2004
Dance for me, Salome." With that seemingly innocent request, Herod Antipas, Tetrarch of Judea, unleashes not only a famously diaphanous display, but a force of imposing evil. By agreeing to her lecherous stepfather's request, Salome gains access to the thing she most covets - the head of John the Baptist on a silver charger. Her Dance of the Seven Veils represents one of the ultimate exercises in decadence, which no doubt explains why it has been immortalized so brilliantly in literature, art and music.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | September 30, 2003
Just when you thought the only financial news in the classical music business is bad news, a refreshing contrast comes from the Baltimore Opera. "The figures are still being audited," says company general director Michael Harrison, "but we believe they will show that we ended the 2002-2003 season with a very modest operating surplus. It has been a very, very difficult year. The ticket goal was a tough one; we had to raise money to make up for not making our projected ticket sales. A lot of people who are extremely dedicated to the company came to the fore and have made Herculean strides in their giving."
NEWS
By Dorothea Straus JTC and Dorothea Straus JTC,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 15, 1997
"Inventing Memory: A Novel of Mothers and Daughters," by Erica Jong. HarperCollins. 312 pages. $24.95The title of Erica Jong's new novel might seem to be an oxymoron. But I believe that good fiction remembers, and memory benefits, from the spice of imagination. This blend is demonstrated with brio, in Jong's first novel, "Fear of Flying," which recounts the adventures of its heroine, a type of late 20th centuryAmerican-Jewish Moll Flanders."Inventing Memory," however, denies its title by being pure contrivance.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 16, 2004
With congressional hearings on indecency leading to new protections of public sensibilities (at least on TV and radio), and a hit, Bible-based movie generating vociferous debate on anti-Semitism and artistic license, it couldn't be a better time to encounter Richard Strauss' opera Salome or Bach's St. John Passion. Both works - the Baltimore Opera Company has a well-worth-catching production of Salome running through Sunday; the Annapolis Chorale will perform the Bach piece on Saturday - raise some of the same issues that have been swirling around Mel Gibson's The Passion of the Christ.
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