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By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | November 6, 1997
The outbreak of intestinal illness among people who attended a church supper in St. Mary's County is a sobering reminder of the risk posed by salmonella -- the leading cause of foodborne sickness in the United States.And the death of an elderly woman -- who was among the 143 people who reportedly got sick after the dinner -- illustrates the fact that the aged are particularly at risk for serious and even fatal complications of the bacterial infection.Health officials in St. Mary's County do not know what caused the disease, but are leaning toward turkey as a possible culprit.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 27, 2000
Agriculture Department officials say they are discussing the possibility of easing their new standards for preventing salmonella contamination in ground beef used for the nation's school lunch program. The reconsideration, provoked by criticism from the food industry, has angered consumer advocates. Since June, the department, which provides 70 percent of the ground beef used in schools, has required that every batch it buys be free of salmonella, bacteria responsible for about 600 deaths and 1.4 million illnesses last year.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,U.S. Department of Agriculture | December 12, 1991
Fresh from celebrating her roommate's birthday at a cozy Baltimore restaurant, the 20-year-old Loyola College student retired contentedly for the night. The piquant flavor of Caesar salad lingered as a pleasant memory. She drifted into sleep.With a start, she awoke a few hours later with knife-like stomach pains. Then came a cascading series of symptoms: intense vomiting, diarrhea, muscle pains, and alternating fevers and chills that left her too weak to climb stairs without help.After three days of escalating misery, she checked into the hospital, where doctors found her blood pressure dangerously low and her kidneys verging on failure.
NEWS
By Nick Miroff and Lyndsey Layton and Nick Miroff and Lyndsey Layton,The Washington Post | February 14, 2009
WASHINGTON - The peanut company at the center of the nationwide salmonella scare has filed for Chapter 7 bankruptcy protection and will begin liquidating its assets as a crush of legal claims pile up against Lynchburg, Va.-based Peanut Corp. of America. "Given that PCA is under criminal investigation, I'm not surprised they've gone bankrupt," said Bill Marler, a Seattle-based lawyer representing 47 clients who are suing the company, including family members of two victims who died after reportedly consuming peanut products tainted with salmonella.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Dan Thanh Dang and Peter Jensen and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF Sun staff writers JoAnna Daemmrich, Michael Dresser and Neal Thompson contributed to this article | November 6, 1997
CHAPTICO -- One person has died from food poisoning and at least 143 others became sick after eating a stuffed ham, turkey and fried oyster dinner at a small Catholic church in this tiny Southern Maryland community.Health officials said yesterday that the culprit is salmonella, a bacterium that is a common source of food poisoning.The incident represents the largest salmonella outbreak in Maryland in at least five years.Investigators have not determined what specific food triggered the illness that spread among the 1,400 people who purchased a dinner Sunday afternoon at the annual Fall Festival at Our Lady of the Wayside Church in Chaptico, little more than a crossroads about 40 miles southeast of Washington.
NEWS
October 24, 1999
To kill the salmonella organism, the temperature of an egg or egg dish must reach a temperature of 160 degrees (or be held at 140 degrees for 3 1/2 minutes). A quick-read thermometer provides a quick, easy way to measure the internal temperature of egg dishes. -- Cole's Cooking A to Z
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Contributing Writer | October 5, 1993
Q: Should I pay attention to my wife when she says that we should not order Caesar salads in restaurants?A: The easy answer is to tell you that you should always listen to what your wife says. She may not be right on every occasion, but it is true that Caesar salad dressing, made with raw eggs, has been responsible for many outbreaks of gastrointestinal illness due to contamination of eggs with salmonella bacteria.These bacteria pose no threat when eggs are properly cooked, but salmonella may infect the intestine if you eat foods containing raw or undercooked eggs.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | November 10, 1997
HELEN -- For lovers of Southern Maryland's church dinners, the best and worst possible outcomes from last week's salmonella outbreak occurred yesterday in St. Mary's County.At St. Joseph's Roman Catholic Church's annual dinner in Helen, hundreds of parishioners, neighbors and county officials -- all with hearty appetites -- gobbled plates of old or salted ham, turkey, oysters, kale and green beans. Many said they attended to show their support for the area's tradition, including some who had recovered from being ill with salmonella.
FEATURES
By Charlyne Varkonyi | July 24, 1991
Every time someone gives advice on how to avoid salmonella food poisoning, he or she suggests substituting pasteurized eggs that have been heated to kill the bacteria rather than the troublesome raw eggs.Good advice. But pasteurized eggs just haven't been readily available for the home cook locally.The wait is almost over. Table Ready Egg, a pasteurized and homogenized whole egg product from Papetti's Hygrade Egg Products Inc. of Elizabeth, N.J., should be in the dairy cases of Baltimore's major chain supermarkets right after Labor Day, according to president Arthur Papetti.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | November 26, 1997
Health officials investigating the salmonella poisoning of nearly 750 people at a church supper in St. Mary's County this month have determined that the stuffed hams served to patrons were contaminated during the cooking and cooling processes at two local markets.The officials said yesterday that they will not penalize the markets."We're not considering taking any action," said Dr. Ebenezer Israel, county health officer. "If we felt there were serious problems at either of the [markets], we would deny them an operating permit.
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