Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSalmonella
IN THE NEWS

Salmonella

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 29, 2010
Amid the sour partisan rancor in Washington, there is a glimmer of sweet hope. The FDA Food Safety Modernization Act stands a good chance to pass the Senate on Monday night. The bill, which increases the Food and Drug Administration's authority over the food supply, has been worked on by Republicans and Democrats for two years. The finished product, while not a four-star creation, is certainly palatable. The bill would give the FDA mandatory recall authority — a power it oddly now lacks — as well as the authority to test widely for dangerous pathogens and trace the outbreaks back to their source.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | August 14, 2014
McCormick & Co. Inc. has recalled its ground oregano spice because of possible salmonella contamination. The voluntary recall of McCormick's .75 ounce Ground Oregano bottle with "best by" dates of Aug. 21, 2016 and Aug. 22, 2016 does not apply to any other McCormick ground, whole or oregano leaves products. The recall affects 1,032 cases that were shipped to Maryland and 40 other states. Salmonella is an organism that can cause serious or fatal infections in young children and people who are elderly or have weakened immune systems.
Advertisement
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | June 19, 2012
The University of Maryland School of Medicine's Center for Vaccine Development has won a $4 million grant to develop a new vaccine to prevent non-typhoidal Salmonella. The center will partner with Indian vaccine maker Bharat Biotech on the project, which will be fast-tracked. The type of Salmonella is common - and deadly - particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. The funding comes from the Wellcome Trust , Maryland officials said. “It's an imprimatur because of the prestige associated with the Trust's involvement, the rigorous vetting process, and the opportunity for the University of Maryland, in collaboration with Bharat, to bring forth a potentially life-saving vaccine for a very underserved population.” said Dr. Myron Levine, the Simon and Bessie Grollman Distinguished Professor of Medicine and center, director in a statement.
NEWS
May 26, 2014
Folks ready to fire up their outdoor grill on Memorial Day face a deadly choice of inflicting food poisoning or cancer on family and friends: food poisoning by E. coli and Salmonella bacteria, if they under-cook the meat; cancer, if they heat meat to the point of creating cancer-causing compounds. Luckily, a bunch of enterprising food manufacturers and processors have met this challenge head-on by developing a great variety of healthful, delicious and convenient, un-chicken, veggie burgers and soy dogs.
BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | August 14, 2014
McCormick & Co. Inc. has recalled its ground oregano spice because of possible salmonella contamination. The voluntary recall of McCormick's .75 ounce Ground Oregano bottle with "best by" dates of Aug. 21, 2016 and Aug. 22, 2016 does not apply to any other McCormick ground, whole or oregano leaves products. The recall affects 1,032 cases that were shipped to Maryland and 40 other states. Salmonella is an organism that can cause serious or fatal infections in young children and people who are elderly or have weakened immune systems.
NEWS
May 26, 2014
Folks ready to fire up their outdoor grill on Memorial Day face a deadly choice of inflicting food poisoning or cancer on family and friends: food poisoning by E. coli and Salmonella bacteria, if they under-cook the meat; cancer, if they heat meat to the point of creating cancer-causing compounds. Luckily, a bunch of enterprising food manufacturers and processors have met this challenge head-on by developing a great variety of healthful, delicious and convenient, un-chicken, veggie burgers and soy dogs.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2012
After years of complex research, a small team of University of Maryland scientists says it has developed a simple solution to a killer Third World disease using salt. It's a bit more complicated than ordinary table salt, though the crystals have the same origins. The salt forms around an ancient microbe that has been genetically manipulated to act as a vaccine for salmonella, responsible for hundreds of thousands of deaths a year globally. Discovered decades ago and the subject of intense research by many scientists, the microbe, called Haloarchaea, turns out to be such a good platform for vaccines that it could be employed against a variety of afflictions in poor and rich countries alike, said Shiladitya DasSarma, professor of microbiology and immunology in Maryland's School of Medicine.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis | September 8, 1992
Q: Should I pay attention to my wife when she says that we should not order Caesar salads in restaurants?A: The easy answer is to tell you that you should always listen to what your wife says. She may not be right on every occasion, but it is true that Caesar salad dressing, made with raw eggs, has been responsible for many outbreaks of gastrointestinal illness due to contamination of eggs with Salmonella bacteria. These bacteria pose no threat when eggs are properly cooked, but Salmonella may infect the intestine if you eat foods containing raw or under-cooked eggs.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 6, 1991
Millions of turtle eggs exported from the United States to be hatched and the turtles sold as pets may harbor strains of salmonella bacteria that are resistant to antibiotics and could pose a serious international health threat to young children, U.S. and Canadian health officials say.Salmonella carried by healthy reptiles and livestock can infect people and cause severe abdominal cramps, nausea, diarrhea and vomiting. The condition is rarely fatal in adults, but in young children it can require hospitalization.
NEWS
By Douglas M. Birch and Douglas M. Birch,SUN STAFF | November 13, 1997
The state medical examiner ruled yesterday that the death of a St. Mary's County woman was caused by eating salmonella-tainted food at a church supper.Dr. John E. Smialek released a statement confirming suspicions that the death of Grace Oatley, 81, of Chaptico was due to the Nov. 2 outbreak.She died the evening of Nov. 4.Nearly 750 people became ill after they ate a ham-and-turkey dinner at Our Lady of the Wayside Church in Chaptico.Health officials said a Baltimore woman who died after eating food from the supper was likely a heart attack victim.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2012
After years of complex research, a small team of University of Maryland scientists says it has developed a simple solution to a killer Third World disease using salt. It's a bit more complicated than ordinary table salt, though the crystals have the same origins. The salt forms around an ancient microbe that has been genetically manipulated to act as a vaccine for salmonella, responsible for hundreds of thousands of deaths a year globally. Discovered decades ago and the subject of intense research by many scientists, the microbe, called Haloarchaea, turns out to be such a good platform for vaccines that it could be employed against a variety of afflictions in poor and rich countries alike, said Shiladitya DasSarma, professor of microbiology and immunology in Maryland's School of Medicine.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | June 19, 2012
The University of Maryland School of Medicine's Center for Vaccine Development has won a $4 million grant to develop a new vaccine to prevent non-typhoidal Salmonella. The center will partner with Indian vaccine maker Bharat Biotech on the project, which will be fast-tracked. The type of Salmonella is common - and deadly - particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. The funding comes from the Wellcome Trust , Maryland officials said. “It's an imprimatur because of the prestige associated with the Trust's involvement, the rigorous vetting process, and the opportunity for the University of Maryland, in collaboration with Bharat, to bring forth a potentially life-saving vaccine for a very underserved population.” said Dr. Myron Levine, the Simon and Bessie Grollman Distinguished Professor of Medicine and center, director in a statement.
HEALTH
Andrea K. Walker | April 16, 2012
Federal health regulators have linked a recent salmonella outbreak in several states, including 11 people infected in Maryland, to yellowfin tuna produced at a California company. Moon Marine USA Corp. of Cupertino, CA. , has voluntarily recalled more than 58,000 pounds of tuna labeled Nakaochi Scrape, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration said Friday.  Nakaocho Scrape is tuna backmeat with a ground up appearance that is scraped from the bones of the fish. The product isn't sold to individual consumers, but may have been used to make sushi, sashimi, ceviche and other dishes available at grocery stores and restaurants.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2012
Eight people in Maryland are among 93 across the country who have been sickened by a salmonella outbreak with a possible link to sushi, according to state health officials. The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention began investigating the outbreak in January, and the first Maryland cases were discovered last month, said Alvina Chu, an epidemiologist and chief of the division of outbreak investigation at the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. The strain being investigated is salmonella bareilly , and infections have been reported in 19 states and the District of Columbia.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | April 3, 2012
State health officials are warning Marylanders that baby rabbits, turtles, chicks, ducklings and other animals popular around the Easter holiday can spread salmonella and other harmful bacteria to people. Since September 2001, six people in Maryland have contracted bacterial infections from baby turtles, or those with shells less than four inches wide, according to the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. Five of the cases required hospitalizations. U.S. Food and Drug Administration rules don't allow the sale of baby turtles, but in three of the cases the turtles were bought from a neighborhood baby turtle vendor.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker | May 3, 2011
Giant Food said today it is recalling vegetable snack packages made by Mann Packing that contain celery, carrots and tomatoes. The grape tomato ingredient in the packages may be contaminated with Salmonella. The packages impacted have best if used by dates ranging from May 9, 2011 – May 16, 2011. The packages are 8.75 oz and have the code: UPC 71651901501 Giant Food has received no reports of illness associated with consumption of this product. Customers who have purchased the product should bring any unused portions or their purchase receipt to any store for a full refund.
NEWS
By McClatchy-Tribune | August 1, 2008
WASHINGTON - Turf struggles, bad communication and weak leadership undermined the federal response to a recent salmonella outbreak that cost the tomato industry huge losses, witnesses told a House of Representatives subcommittee yesterday. Lawmakers joined farmers in a wholesale attack on the Food and Drug Administration's performance, potentially laying the political foundation for a regulatory overhaul and multimillion-dollar compensation package. "We have been the primary injured party," Reginald Brown, the executive vice president of the Florida Tomato Growers Exchange, told the House panel, "and we look forward to Congress addressing that in the future."
NEWS
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Staff Writer Staff writer Jonathan Bor contributed to this article | September 11, 1992
One person has died and more than 30 others were hospitalized in what the state health department says is one of the largest instances of salmonella poisoning in state history.All told, 118 people got sick at a Korean wedding reception in Columbia Aug. 29. They ate contaminated food that guests had brought to the reception from as far away as New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania, according to Tory Leonard, health department spokeswoman."We're not sure how they handled the food or if they had proper food care," she said.
NEWS
November 29, 2010
Amid the sour partisan rancor in Washington, there is a glimmer of sweet hope. The FDA Food Safety Modernization Act stands a good chance to pass the Senate on Monday night. The bill, which increases the Food and Drug Administration's authority over the food supply, has been worked on by Republicans and Democrats for two years. The finished product, while not a four-star creation, is certainly palatable. The bill would give the FDA mandatory recall authority — a power it oddly now lacks — as well as the authority to test widely for dangerous pathogens and trace the outbreaks back to their source.
NEWS
August 30, 2010
Marylanders were fortunate to dodge the latest salmonella scare. The tainted eggs that came from two Iowa egg producers did not find their way into Mid-Atlantic markets. Last week, the Maryland Department of Agriculture said that its inspectors had found none of the affected eggs in the state. Still, it is disconcerting that, as reported by The Washington Post, an Iowa egg farmer in the center of the current recall, Austin " Jack" DeCoster, ran a troubled egg operation in Kent County in early 1990s.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.